30

I'm trying to implement a binary search algorithm in JavaScript. Things seem okay, but my return statements appear to be returning undefined? Can anybody tell what's wrong here?

Fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/2mBdL/

Thanks.

var a = [
    1,
    2,
    4,
    6,
    1,
    100,
    0,
    10000,
    3
];

a.sort(function (a, b) {
    return a - b;
});

console.log('a,', a);

function binarySearch(arr, i) {
    var mid = Math.floor(arr.length / 2);
    console.log(arr[mid], i);

    if (arr[mid] === i) {
        console.log('match', arr[mid], i);
        return arr[mid];
    } else if (arr[mid] < i && arr.length > 1) {
        console.log('mid lower', arr[mid], i);
        binarySearch(arr.splice(mid, Number.MAX_VALUE), i);
    } else if (arr[mid] > i && arr.length > 1) {
        console.log('mid higher', arr[mid], i);
        binarySearch(arr.splice(0, mid), i);
    } else {
        console.log('not here', i);
        return -1;
    }

}
var result = binarySearch(a, 100);
console.log(result);
  • 1
    also, why is 'a' being modified by arr.splice? – 4m1r Mar 27 '14 at 19:58
  • 3
    To return the recursing states, you need return binarySearch(...) in each case. – cmbuckley Mar 27 '14 at 20:01
  • Splice modifies the original array, see W3Schools; this includes it being passed by reference. A good point to start off is nczonline.net/blog/2009/06/09/… – Sunny Patel Mar 27 '14 at 20:02
  • It's marked as being unlikely to help future visitors, as it's only a minor error. – cmbuckley Mar 27 '14 at 20:20
  • Why are you returning the value that matches the target? That makes the whole search redundant! You should return the index – gb96 Nov 11 '15 at 23:31

23 Answers 23

18

You're not explicitly returning the recursive inner calls (i.e. return binarySearch()), so the call stack unfolds with no return value. Update your code like so:

// ...
if (arr[mid] === i) {
    console.log('match', arr[mid], i);
    return arr[mid];
} else if (arr[mid] < i && arr.length > 1) {
    console.log('mid lower', arr[mid], i);
    return binarySearch(arr.splice(mid, Number.MAX_VALUE), i);
} else if (arr[mid] > i && arr.length > 1) {
    console.log('mid higher', arr[mid], i);
    return binarySearch(arr.splice(0, mid), i);
} else {
// ...

See a working fiddle

  • 1
    Awesome, thanks. And I guess, it's okay to be splicing the original array? – 4m1r Mar 27 '14 at 20:11
  • well, that is up to you. if you want to avoid mutation of the passed array, clone it beforehand (e.g. var _arr = arr.slice(0)). here's a fiddle for that. – Eliran Malka Mar 27 '14 at 20:19
  • 11
    Why are you returning the value that matches the target? That makes the whole search redundant! You should return the index. – gb96 Nov 11 '15 at 23:31
67

It's useful to write a search function in such a way that it returns a negative value indicating the insertion point for the new element if the element is not found. Also, using recursion in a binary search is excessive and unnecessary. And finally, it's a good practice to make the search algorithm generic by supplying a comparator function as a parameter. Below is the implementation.

function binarySearch(ar, el, compare_fn) {
    var m = 0;
    var n = ar.length - 1;
    while (m <= n) {
        var k = (n + m) >> 1;
        var cmp = compare_fn(el, ar[k]);
        if (cmp > 0) {
            m = k + 1;
        } else if(cmp < 0) {
            n = k - 1;
        } else {
            return k;
        }
    }
    return -m - 1;
}

This code with comments and a unit test here.

  • 1
    your algorithm returns -m -1 but your code comments in jsfiddle refer to a return value of -n -1. Possible typo? – Darragh McCarthy Oct 8 '15 at 0:13
  • easy to read, elegant, and succinct. I also like >> 1 rather than, / 2 – Rafael Jul 13 '16 at 15:42
  • yea it does not work, you need to take make m = k and n = k – user7432237 Apr 21 '17 at 0:26
  • 1
    In response to the skeptics, I extended the unit tests to a suite of random tests. All tests pass, all the time. Check out the fiddle jsfiddle.net/pkfst550/48 – Alexander Ryzhov Jun 5 '17 at 23:24
  • 2
    Return value of 0 is ambiguous. Is the element at the head of the list, or does it need to be inserted there? – Alex Coventry Aug 7 '18 at 19:00
13

There are many workable solutions to this question, but all of them return early once they have found a match. While this might have a small positive effect on performance, this is negligible due to the logarithmic nature of binary search and can actually hurt performance if the comparison function is expensive to compute.

What is more, it prevents a very useful application of the binary search algorithm: finding a range of matching elements, also known as finding the lower or upper bound.

The following implementation returns an index 0iarray.length such that the given predicate is false for array[i - 1] and true for array[i]. If the predicate is false everywhere, array.length is returned.

/**
 * Return 0 <= i <= array.length such that !pred(array[i - 1]) && pred(array[i]).
 */
function binarySearch(array, pred) {
    let lo = -1, hi = array.length;
    while (1 + lo < hi) {
        const mi = lo + ((hi - lo) >> 1);
        if (pred(array[mi])) {
            hi = mi;
        } else {
            lo = mi;
        }
    }
    return hi;
}

Assume for the sake of argument that pred(array[-1]) === false and pred(array[array.length]) === true (although of course the predicate is never evaluated at those points). The loop maintains the invariant !pred(array[lo]) && pred(array[hi]). The algorithm terminates when 1 + lo === hi which implies !pred(array[hi - 1]) && pred(array[hi]), the desired postcondition.

If an array is sort()ed with respect to a comparison function compare, the function returns the smallest insert position of an item when invoked as

binarySearch(array, j => 0 <= compare(item, j));

An insert position is an index at which an item would be found if it existed in the array.

It is easy to implement lower and upper bound for an array in natural ordering as follows.

/**
 * Return i such that array[i - 1] < item <= array[i].
 */
function lowerBound(array, item) {
    return binarySearch(array, j => item <= j);
}

/**
 * Return i such that array[i - 1] <= item < array[i].
 */
function upperBound(array, item) {
    return binarySearch(array, j => item < j);
}

Of course, this is most useful when the array can contain several elements that compare identically, for example where elements contain additional data that is not part of the sort criteria.

  • 1
    While this does not exactly answer the original question ( though I am confused as to what the point of the original question is ), I voted up anyway because good information can be difficult to find on SO. One suggestion, as life permits, please provide answers like this to questions with a longer history and more activity. Doing so will make your knowledge and experience more accessible to more people. :-) – Nolo Mar 14 '17 at 8:41
  • Out of curiosity, why const mi? Is it for semantic intent, i.e. mi should only be assigned once? Seems let mi would suffice otherwise. – Nolo Mar 14 '17 at 8:54
  • @Nolo yes, the const is semantic – your reasoning is the wrong way round though ;) of course let would work because it's more lenient, but here a strict const is sufficient – joki Mar 15 '17 at 9:18
  • @Nolo thanks for the upvote and your suggestion regarding where to post… I think when I wrote this, the title of this question seemed general enough, but I see what you mean by threads with more activity ;) – joki Mar 15 '17 at 9:21
  • I see. So would this particular case make a difference in what gets emitted from the jit, i.e. let vs const? Never tried to build and see what comes out of it, really should start doing that. – Nolo Mar 15 '17 at 22:41
7

Here is the binary search function , you can check

   function bsearch (Arr,value){
        var low  = 0 , high = Arr.length -1 ,mid ;      
        while (low <= high){
            mid = Math.floor((low+high)/2);     
            if(Arr[mid]==value) return mid ; 
            else if (Arr[mid]<value) low = mid+1;
            else high = mid-1;          
        }
        return -1 ;
    }
3

This is my solution!

// perform a binarysearch to find the position in the array
function binarySearch(searchElement, searchArray) {
    'use strict';

    var stop = searchArray.length;
    var last, p = 0,
        delta = 0;

    do {
        last = p;

        if (searchArray[p] > searchElement) {
            stop = p + 1;
            p -= delta;
        } else if (searchArray[p] === searchElement) {
            // FOUND A MATCH!
            return p;
        }

        delta = Math.floor((stop - p) / 2);
        p += delta; //if delta = 0, p is not modified and loop exits

    }while (last !== p);

    return -1; //nothing found

};
3

Binary Search ES6

// bottom-up
function binarySearch (arr, val) {
    let start = 0;
    let end = arr.length - 1;

    while (start <= end) {
        let mid = Math.floor((start + end) / 2);

        if (arr[mid] === val) {
            return mid;
        }
        if (val < arr[mid]) {
            end = mid - 1;
        } else {
            start = mid + 1;
        }
    }
    return -1;
}

different approach:

// recursive
function binarySearch(arr, val, start = 0, end = arr.length - 1) {
    const mid = Math.floor((start + end) / 2);

    if (val === arr[mid]) {
        return mid;
    }
    if (start >= end) {
        return -1;
    }
    return val < arr[mid]
        ? binarySearch(arr, val, start, mid - 1)
        : binarySearch(arr, val, mid + 1, end);
}
1

[Apologies to Joki: my original answer was basically a slimmed down clone of his solution. To amend my wrong doing, I tore apart my original answer and invented a new original solution seen below 🙂]

You want speed? Read this. (Please.)

Binary searches implemented right (without modify the array, making copies of the array, or other absurdities) have an average complexity around O(k*log2(n)) (where k is constant). Say you have an array of 1024 elements, and the constant k is 1 in this case. With a linear search, the average complexity would be O(k*n/2)=O(1*1024/2)=O(512). With a binary search, you would have a complexity of O(k*log2(n))=O(1*log2(1024))=O(1*10)=O(10). Now, say that you make both the linear search algorithm twice as fast and the binary search algorithm twice as fast: now, k is 0.5; the complexity of the linear search decreases to O(256) (a gain of 256 performance points), whereas the binary search decreases O(5) (a gain of only 5 performance points). This minimal gain from optimizing the binary search method is because the binary search method is already so fast. Therefore, any sane person should be more inclined to optimize the rest of their program before they try to optimize their binary search algorithm. However, I am not a sane person; thus, I have optimized the binary search function to (what I believe is) the absolute limit (in javascript).

To start off the performance maxima, let us first investigate the initial function I started with. This function may be much slower than the ones shown further down the page, but it should be easier to understand so that you are not completely lost later on.

const sArr = [0,4,5,6,9,13,14,21,27,44];
document.write(slowestBS(sArr, 14)); // don't use document.write in production

function slowestBS(array, searchedValue, ARG_start, ARG_len){
  // Range of [start, start+len): only start is inclusive. It works
  // similarly to "...".substr(start, len).indexOf(sValue)
  // `void 0` is shorthand for `undefined`
  var start = ARG_start |0;
  var len = (ARG_len === void 0 ? (array.length|0)-start : ARG_len) | 0;
  len = len - 1 |0;
  for (let i=0x80000000; i; i >>>= 1) {
    if (len & i) {
      const withoutCurBit = len & ~(i-1);
      if (array[start + withoutCurBit] > searchedValue) {
        len = withoutCurBit - 1 |0;
      }
    }
  }
  if (array[start+len] !== searchedValue) {
    // remove this if-statement to return the next closest
    // element going downwards from the searched-for value
    // OR 0 if the value is less than all values in the
    // array
    return (-1 - start |0) - len |0;
  }
  return start + len |0;
}

The return value of the above function is as follows.

  • If the value was found, then it returns the index of the value.
  • If the value was not found, then it returns -1 - nearestIndex where the nearestIndex is the index found which is the closest number <= index and capped at 0.
  • If the array is not sorted within the specified range, then it will return some meaningless number.

To start the optimizations, let us first remove that pesky inner if-branch.

const sArr = [0,4,5,6,9,13,14,21,27,44];
document.write(compactBS(sArr, 44)); // don't use document.write in production

function compactBS(array, searchedValue, ARG_start, ARG_len){
  // `void 0` is shorthand for `undefined`
  var start = ARG_start === void 0 ? 0 : ARG_start |0;
  var len = (ARG_len === void 0 ? (array.length|0) - start : ARG_len) |0;
  len = len - 1 | 0;
  for (let i=0x80000000; i; i >>>= 1) {
    if (len & i) {
      const noCBit = len & ~(i-1);
      // noCBits now contains all the bits in len that are
      // greater than the present value of i.
      len ^= (
        (len ^ (noCBit-1)) & 
        ((array[start+noCBit] <= searchedValue |0) - 1 >>>0)
      ); // works based on the logic that `(x^y)^x === y` is always true
    }
  }
  if (array[start+len] !== searchedValue) {
    // remove this if-statement to return the next closest
    // element going downwards from the searched-for value
    // OR 0 if the value is less than all values in the
    // array
    return (-1 - start |0) - len |0;
  }
  return start + len |0;
}

And now, then, unroll it, precompute it, make it fast, nice and good, just like that:

const sArr = [0,4,5,6,9,13,14,21,27,44];
document.write(goodBinarySearch(sArr, 5)); // don't use document.write in
                                           //  production

function goodBinarySearch(array, sValue, ARG_start, ARG_len){
  // Range of [start, start+len): only start is inclusive. It works
  // similarly to "...".substr(start, len).indexOf(sValue)
  // `void 0` is shorthand for `undefined`
  var start = (ARG_start === void 0 ? 0 : ARG_start) | 0;
  var len = (ARG_len === void 0 ? (array.length|0) - start : ARG_len) |0;
  len = len - 1 |0;
  
  if (len & 0x80000000) {
    const nCB = len & 0x80000000;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x40000000) {
    const nCB = len & 0xc0000000;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x20000000) {
    const nCB = len & 0xe0000000;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x10000000) {
    const nCB = len & 0xf0000000;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x8000000) {
    const nCB = len & 0xf8000000;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x4000000) {
    const nCB = len & 0xfc000000;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x2000000) {
    const nCB = len & 0xfe000000;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x1000000) {
    const nCB = len & 0xff000000;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x800000) {
    const nCB = len & 0xff800000;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x400000) {
    const nCB = len & 0xffc00000;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x200000) {
    const nCB = len & 0xffe00000;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x100000) {
    const nCB = len & 0xfff00000;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x80000) {
    const nCB = len & 0xfff80000;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x40000) {
    const nCB = len & 0xfffc0000;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x20000) {
    const nCB = len & 0xfffe0000;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x10000) {
    const nCB = len & 0xffff0000;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x8000) {
    const nCB = len & 0xffff8000;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x4000) {
    const nCB = len & 0xffffc000;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x2000) {
    const nCB = len & 0xffffe000;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x1000) {
    const nCB = len & 0xfffff000;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x800) {
    const nCB = len & 0xfffff800;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x400) {
    const nCB = len & 0xfffffc00;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x200) {
    const nCB = len & 0xfffffe00;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x100) {
    const nCB = len & 0xffffff00;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x80) {
    const nCB = len & 0xffffff80;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x40) {
    const nCB = len & 0xffffffc0;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x20) {
    const nCB = len & 0xffffffe0;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x10) {
    const nCB = len & 0xfffffff0;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x8) {
    const nCB = len & 0xfffffff8;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x4) {
    const nCB = len & 0xfffffffc;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x2) {
    const nCB = len & 0xfffffffe;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x1) {
    const nCB = len & 0xffffffff;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (array[start+len|0] !== sValue) {
    // remove this if-statement to return the next closest
    // element going downwards from the searched-for value
    // OR 0 if the value is less than all values in the
    // array
    return (-1 - start |0) - len |0;
  }
  return start + len |0;
}

But wait... asunder whispers the eve of even greater performance. Likely, you are calling the binary search in a tight loop. In such a case, we can precompute the first value that will actually get processed and skip right to it with our performance lord and savior: the integer index switch statement. HOWEVER, while using this, you must make certain that you never reuse the generated fast function after the length of the array has been modified because then only part of the array will be searched.

const clz32 = Math.clz32 || (function(log, LN2){
  return function(x) {
    return 31 - log(x >>> 0) / LN2 | 0; // the "| 0" acts like math.floor
  };
})(Math.log, Math.LN2);

const sArr = [0,4,5,6,9,13,14,21,27,44];
const compFunc = fastestBS(sArr);
for (let x of sArr) // don't use for-of in production
  // this statement is esoteric: a traditional for loop is always faster
  // than for-of, and even more so faster when you need the index!
  document.write(x+" is at "+compFunc(x)+"<br/>"); // don't use document.write
                                                   //  in production

function fastestBS(array, ARG_start, ARG_initLen){
  // Range of [start, start+len): only start is inclusive. It works
  // similarly to "...".substr(start, len).indexOf(sValue)
  // `void 0` is shorthand for `undefined`
  var start = ARG_start === void 0 ? 0 : ARG_start |0;
  var initLen = (ARG_initLen===void 0 ? (array.length|0)-start : ARG_initLen) |0;
  initLen = initLen - 1 |0;
  const compGoto = clz32(initLen) & 31;
  return function(sValue) {
    var len = initLen | 0;
    switch (compGoto) {
      case 0:
        if (len & 0x80000000) {
          const nCB = len & 0x80000000;
          len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
        }
      case 1:
        if (len & 0x40000000) {
          const nCB = len & 0xc0000000;
          len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
        }
      case 2:
        if (len & 0x20000000) {
          const nCB = len & 0xe0000000;
          len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
        }
      case 3:
        if (len & 0x10000000) {
          const nCB = len & 0xf0000000;
          len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
        }
      case 4:
        if (len & 0x8000000) {
          const nCB = len & 0xf8000000;
          len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
        }
      case 5:
        if (len & 0x4000000) {
          const nCB = len & 0xfc000000;
          len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
        }
      case 6:
        if (len & 0x2000000) {
          const nCB = len & 0xfe000000;
          len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
        }
      case 7:
        if (len & 0x1000000) {
          const nCB = len & 0xff000000;
          len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
        }
      case 8:
        if (len & 0x800000) {
          const nCB = len & 0xff800000;
          len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
        }
      case 9:
        if (len & 0x400000) {
          const nCB = len & 0xffc00000;
          len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
        }
      case 10:
        if (len & 0x200000) {
          const nCB = len & 0xffe00000;
          len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
        }
      case 11:
        if (len & 0x100000) {
          const nCB = len & 0xfff00000;
          len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
        }
      case 12:
        if (len & 0x80000) {
          const nCB = len & 0xfff80000;
          len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
        }
      case 13:
        if (len & 0x40000) {
          const nCB = len & 0xfffc0000;
          len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
        }
      case 14:
        if (len & 0x20000) {
          const nCB = len & 0xfffe0000;
          len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
        }
      case 15:
        if (len & 0x10000) {
          const nCB = len & 0xffff0000;
          len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
        }
      case 16:
        if (len & 0x8000) {
          const nCB = len & 0xffff8000;
          len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
        }
      case 17:
        if (len & 0x4000) {
          const nCB = len & 0xffffc000;
          len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
        }
      case 18:
        if (len & 0x2000) {
          const nCB = len & 0xffffe000;
          len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
        }
      case 19:
        if (len & 0x1000) {
          const nCB = len & 0xfffff000;
          len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
        }
      case 20:
        if (len & 0x800) {
          const nCB = len & 0xfffff800;
          len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
        }
      case 21:
        if (len & 0x400) {
          const nCB = len & 0xfffffc00;
          len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
        }
      case 22:
        if (len & 0x200) {
          const nCB = len & 0xfffffe00;
          len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
        }
      case 23:
        if (len & 0x100) {
          const nCB = len & 0xffffff00;
          len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
        }
      case 24:
        if (len & 0x80) {
          const nCB = len & 0xffffff80;
          len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
        }
      case 25:
        if (len & 0x40) {
          const nCB = len & 0xffffffc0;
          len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
        }
      case 26:
        if (len & 0x20) {
          const nCB = len & 0xffffffe0;
          len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
        }
      case 27:
        if (len & 0x10) {
          const nCB = len & 0xfffffff0;
          len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
        }
      case 28:
        if (len & 0x8) {
          const nCB = len & 0xfffffff8;
          len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
        }
      case 29:
        if (len & 0x4) {
          const nCB = len & 0xfffffffc;
          len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
        }
      case 30:
        if (len & 0x2) {
          const nCB = len & 0xfffffffe;
          len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
        }
      case 31:
        if (len & 0x1) {
          const nCB = len & 0xffffffff;
          len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
        }

    }
    if (array[start+len|0] !== sValue) {
      // remove this if-statement to return the next closest
      // element going downwards from the searched-for value
      // OR 0 if the value is less than all values in the
      // array
      return (-1 - start |0) - len |0;
    }
    return start + len |0;
  };
}

Since

Demo:

(function(document){"use strict";
var textarea = document.getElementById('inputbox'),
    searchinput = document.getElementById('search'),
    searchStart = document.getElementById('start'),
    searchedLength = document.getElementById('length'),
    resultbox = document.getElementById('result'),
    timeoutID = -1;
function doUpdate(){
   try {
      var txt = textarea.value.replace(/\s*\[|\]\s*/g, '').split(',');
      var arr = JSON.parse(textarea.value);
      var searchval = JSON.parse(searchinput.value);
      var textmtchs = textarea.value.match(/\s*\[|\]\s*/g);
      var start = searchStart.value || void 0;
      var sub = searchedLength.value || void 0;
      
      txt = refSort(txt, arr);
      textarea.value = textmtchs[0] +
                        txt.join(',') +
                       textmtchs[textmtchs.length-1];
      arr = JSON.parse(textarea.value);
      resultbox.value = goodBinarySearch(arr, searchval, start, sub);
   } catch(e) {
      resultbox.value = 'Error';
   }
}
textarea.oninput = searchinput.oninput = 
    searchStart.oninput = searchedLength.oninput =
    textarea.onkeyup = searchinput.onkeyup = 
    searchStart.onkeyup = searchedLength.onkeyup = 
    textarea.onchange = searchinput.onchange = 
    searchStart.onchange = searchedLength.onchange = function(e){
  clearTimeout( timeoutID );
  timeoutID = setTimeout(doUpdate, e.target === textarea ? 384 : 125);
}

function refSort(targetData, refData) {
  var indices = Object.keys(refData);
  indices.sort(function(indexA, indexB) {
    if (refData[indexA] < refData[indexB]) return -1;
    if (refData[indexA] > refData[indexB]) return 1;
    return 0;
  });
  return indices.map(function(i){ return targetData[i] })
}
function goodBinarySearch(array, sValue, ARG_start, ARG_len){
  // Range of [start, start+len): only start is inclusive. It works
  // similarly to "...".substr(start, len).indexOf(sValue)
  // `void 0` is shorthand for `undefined`
  var start = (ARG_start === void 0 ? 0 : ARG_start) | 0;
  var len = (ARG_len === void 0 ? (array.length|0) - start : ARG_len) |0;
  len = len - 1 |0;
  
  if (len & 0x80000000) {
    const nCB = len & 0x80000000;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x40000000) {
    const nCB = len & 0xc0000000;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x20000000) {
    const nCB = len & 0xe0000000;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x10000000) {
    const nCB = len & 0xf0000000;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x8000000) {
    const nCB = len & 0xf8000000;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x4000000) {
    const nCB = len & 0xfc000000;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x2000000) {
    const nCB = len & 0xfe000000;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x1000000) {
    const nCB = len & 0xff000000;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x800000) {
    const nCB = len & 0xff800000;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x400000) {
    const nCB = len & 0xffc00000;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x200000) {
    const nCB = len & 0xffe00000;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x100000) {
    const nCB = len & 0xfff00000;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x80000) {
    const nCB = len & 0xfff80000;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x40000) {
    const nCB = len & 0xfffc0000;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x20000) {
    const nCB = len & 0xfffe0000;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x10000) {
    const nCB = len & 0xffff0000;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x8000) {
    const nCB = len & 0xffff8000;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x4000) {
    const nCB = len & 0xffffc000;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x2000) {
    const nCB = len & 0xffffe000;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x1000) {
    const nCB = len & 0xfffff000;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x800) {
    const nCB = len & 0xfffff800;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x400) {
    const nCB = len & 0xfffffc00;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x200) {
    const nCB = len & 0xfffffe00;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x100) {
    const nCB = len & 0xffffff00;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x80) {
    const nCB = len & 0xffffff80;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x40) {
    const nCB = len & 0xffffffc0;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x20) {
    const nCB = len & 0xffffffe0;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x10) {
    const nCB = len & 0xfffffff0;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x8) {
    const nCB = len & 0xfffffff8;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x4) {
    const nCB = len & 0xfffffffc;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x2) {
    const nCB = len & 0xfffffffe;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (len & 0x1) {
    const nCB = len & 0xffffffff;
    len ^= (len ^ (nCB-1)) & ((array[start+nCB|0] <= sValue |0) - 1 >>>0);
  }
  if (array[start+len|0] !== sValue) {
    // remove this if-statement to return the next closest
    // element going downwards from the searched-for value
    // OR 0 if the value is less than all values in the
    // array
    return (-1 - start |0) - len |0;
  }
  return start + len |0;
}
})(document);
<h3 style="margin:.125em;width:100%;text-align:center">The Array (Must Be A Valid JSON Array)</h3>
<textarea placeholder="[-24, -12, 0, 0, 9, 16, 18, 64, 80]" type="text" rows=6 style="width:calc(100% - .5em);display:block" id="inputbox">[-24, -12, 0, 0, 9, 16, 18, 64, 80]</textarea>

<table style="table-layout:fixed;font-size:1.2em" width="100%"><tbody>
  <tr>
    <td colspan="3">Search Value: <input type="text" id="search" value="-12" style="width:8em;text-align:center;float:right" /></td>
    <td></td>
    <td colspan="3">Resulting Index: <input type="text" id="result" value="1" style="width:8em;text-align:center;float:right" readonly="" />
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td colspan="3">Start Index: <input type="text" id="start" value="" placeholder="(0)" style="width:8em;text-align:center;float:right" /></td>
    <td></td>
    <td colspan="3">Searched Length: <input type="text" id="length" value="" placeholder="(array length)" style="width:8em;text-align:center;float:right" />
  </tr>
</tbody></table>

You can also use an array of strings (surrounded by quotation marks) in the demo, and it should work just fine. To search for a string, you must put quotes around the search value.

  • 2
    I would just like to point out that my version is specified to return array.length for an empty array. You can just return lo if you prefer !pred(array[i]) && pred(array[1 + i]), no need for an additional (costly) comparison. The hi + lo term in your code might overflow which is avoided by the idiom lo + ((hi - lo) >> 1). I consider if … else much more readable than continue + label ;). And my version supports arbitrary comparison functors which can compare only part of the data, among other things. ;) – joki Jul 29 '17 at 12:21
  • A warning about the code above: if called with an empty array, it will access the first element array[0] on the last line which might cause undesirable behaviour… – joki Jul 29 '17 at 15:31
  • @Joki yes, you are correct that if you search for undefined in an empty array ([]), then it will return 0 instead of -1. However, I doubt very many people (if any at all) use undefined to store a value. So, I doubt the extra overhead required for that additional check would ever be used at all. – Jack Giffin Aug 4 '17 at 20:56
  • @joki Arbitrary comparison functions are slow in javascript (unless natively implemented) because every time any function is called, the function's context has to be pushed onto the stack, then popped off the stack once the function has finished executing. This constant pushing/popping every step of the way is rather inefficient. – Jack Giffin Jul 15 '18 at 0:29
  • 1
    …which is precisely why binary search performs better than linear search – the former only does a logarithmic number of comparisons compared to the latter, which can make a big difference if comparison is costly. Fixing the comparison in your search algorithm makes it much less versatile without changing the asymptotic complexity, so the expected speedup on large amounts of data is much smaller. – joki Jul 15 '18 at 8:27
1

A variation of this problem is finding an element closest to the search X if there's no exact match.

To do that, we adapt @Alexander Ryzhov's answer so that it always returns the "insertion point" = index of the smallest of those elements that are greater than or equal to X.

Once we get the result index I, we check the elements at I (which might be X or greater than X) and I-1 (which is smaller) and choose the closest among the two. Don't forget to handle edge cases!

function binarySearch(a, compare) {
    let le = 0,
        ri = a.length - 1;

    while (le <= ri) {
        let mid = (le + ri) >> 1,
            cmp = compare(a[mid]);

        if (cmp > 0) {
            le = mid + 1;
        } else if (cmp < 0) {
            ri = mid - 1;
        } else {
            return mid;
        }
    }

    return le;
}


function binaryClosest(a, compare) {
    let i = binarySearch(a, compare);

    if (i === 0)
        return a[0];

    if (i === a.length)
        return a[i - 1];

    let d1 = -compare(a[i]),
        d2 = compare(a[i - 1]);

    return d1 < d2 ? a[i] : a[i - 1];
}


//

input = [-3, -2, -1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 3]
findX = x => binaryClosest(input, item => x - item)

test = (exp, arg) => {
    let x = findX(arg)
    console.log(exp === x ? 'ok' : 'FAIL', arg, exp, x)
};

test(-3, -99)
test(+3, +99)

test(0, +0.3)
test(0, 0)
test(0, -0.3)

test(-1, -1.3)
test(+1, +1.3)

test(2, 2.2)
test(2, 2.3)
test(2, 2.5)
test(3, 2.6)

  • How do you know that a[i + 1] is not closer? Let's take [1, 10, 15] and 9, wouldnt it go from 10 to 1 and then return 1 ? What am I missing? – Jonas Wilms Apr 6 at 12:22
  • @JonasWilms: despite return le, this bsearch actually returns the right bound, so it's guaranteed that a[i - 1] < X <= a[i]. In your example, bsearch makes 2 moves: L=0,R=2 -- move left - L=0,R=0 -- move right - L=1,R=0 -- fault,1 returned. Note, this is index 1, not value "1"! – georg Apr 6 at 12:46
0

Assuming a sorted array, here's a recursive binary search:

function binSearch(needle, arr) {
  length = arr.length;
  while(length > 1) {
    midpoint = Math.floor(length/2);
    return (needle > arr[midpoint-1]) ? 
           binSearch(needle, arr.splice(midpoint, length)) :    
           binSearch(needle, arr.splice(0, midpoint));
  }
  return needle === arr[0] ? arr[0] : -1;
}
  • Recursive function calling = slow code; all day every day (pretty much no exceptions). – Jack Giffin Jul 7 '17 at 16:31
  • 1
    @JackGiffin: Not to mention splice (explained here why it’s bad). Still upvoted for simplicity and didactic quality. – 7vujy0f0hy Jun 29 '18 at 17:04
  • @7vujy0f0hy Please help me. I fail to see the didatic quality. The usage of the splice goes against instinct in this code snippet because it is used to cut out the unneeded parts, not zone-in on the needed parts of the search array. – Jack Giffin Jul 3 '18 at 23:10
  • @JackGiffin: Demonstrates the principle without technical clutter. Clear and concise. Human-readable. Minimal code that works. Memorable. Sacrifices efficiency for clarity. Gives the student freedom to improve it for real-life applications. Show me better – you can’t. P.S. Your splice argument is “glass is half-empty”-tier. – 7vujy0f0hy Jul 4 '18 at 16:26
0

You should also check for the "value not found" edge case, and make it your first base condition, followed by a successful search. Consequently you do not need to check for array length > 1 when recursing through the array. Finally, since you don't return the array, why not use the Array.prototype.slice method?

var binarySearch = function(arr, val) {
  var half = Math.floor(arr.length / 2);

  if (arr.length === 0) {
    return -1;
  }
  else if (arr[half] === val) {
    console.log("val: ", val, "arr[half]: ", arr[half]);
    return val;
  }
  else if (val > arr[half]) {
    console.log("val: ", val, "arr[half]: ", arr[half]);
    return binarySearch(arr.slice(half, arr.length), val);
  }
  else {
    console.log("val: ", val, "arr[half]: ", arr[half]);
    return binarySearch(arr.slice(0, half), val);
  }
}


var arr = [1, 5, 20, 58, 76, 8, 19, 41].sort(function(a, b) { return a - b });

console.log("Sorted array: " + arr);
console.log(binarySearch(arr, 76));
console.log(binarySearch(arr, 19));
console.log(binarySearch(arr, 0));
  • I like the way your code is presented, but your base case logic is wrong. Try running your implementation by searching for the number '9' and you'll see that your function exceeds the call stack. You need to check whether the array length is equal to 1 rather than 0, and also check whether that one value is equal to 'val', otherwise there are some situations where your function will recurse infinitely. – bean Jun 22 '15 at 3:02
  • Why are you returning the value that matches the target? That makes the whole search redundant! You should return the index. – gb96 Nov 11 '15 at 23:32
0
function binarySearch(a = [], x) {
    let length = a.length;
    if (length === 0) {
        return false;
    } else {
        let m = Math.floor(length/2);
        let y = a[m];
        if (x === y) {
            return true;
        } else if (x < y) {
            return binarySearch(a.slice(0, m), x);
        } else {
            return binarySearch(a.slice(m + 1), x);
        }
    }
}
  • That slice may be elegant, but it is pretty unnecessary, and thus not very performant under these circumstances. – Jack Giffin Jul 7 '17 at 16:31
0

Good afternoon, I understand this post started some time ago, however I thought I could possibly contribute to the discussion.

function binarySearch(array, target, max, min) {

    //Find the Midpoint between forced max and minimum domain of the array
    var mid = ((max - min) >> 1) + min;
    //alert("Midpoint Number" + mid);
    console.log(mid);
    console.log(array[mid], "target: " + target);

    if (array[mid] === target) {
        //Target Value found
        console.log('match', array[mid], target);
        //alert('match', array[mid], target);
        return mid;
    } 
    else if (mid === 0)
    {
        //All Value have been checked, and none are the target value, return sentinel value
        return -1;
    }
    else if (array[mid] > target)
    {
        //Value at Midpoint is greater than target Value, set new maximum to current midpoint
        max = mid;
        console.log('mid lower', array[mid], target);
        //alert('mid lower', array[mid], target);
        //Call binarySearch with new search domain
        return binarySearch(array, target, max, min);
    } 

    else if (array[mid] < target)
    {
        // Value at Midpoint is less than the target Value, set new minimum to current midpoint
        min = mid;
        console.log('mid higher', array[mid], target);
        //alert('mid higher', array[mid], target);

        //Call binarySearch with new search domain
        return binarySearch(array, target, max, min);
    } 

I am sure there is room for refinement here, but this method prevents having to perform a deep copy of the array (which can be a costly action when working with a large data set) and at the same time, it does not modify the array in any way.

Hope that helps! Thanks, Jeremy

  • Why are you returning the value that matches the target? That makes the whole search redundant! You should return the index. – gb96 Nov 11 '15 at 23:33
  • Thanks gb96, I edited my actual solution for posting to strip out some situation specific information and apparently was not paying too much attention when touching that piece. Edited per your VERY necessary correction. – Jeremy Noel Mar 7 '16 at 15:33
0

I have an implementation on github with a comparison between binary and linear and a testing page if you still interested to see more implementations here

0

Here is an ES6 function in functional programming style, that uses a default compare function if none provided: if the value looked for is of the number type, numeric comparison will be assumed, otherwise string comparison.

function binarySearch(arr, val, compFunc = 
    (a, b) => typeof val == 'number' ? a-b : a.localeCompare(b), i=0, j=arr.length) {
  return i >= j ? i
    : ( mid =>
          ( cmp => 
              cmp < 0 ? binarySearch(arr, val, compFunc, i, mid) 
            : cmp > 0 ? binarySearch(arr, val, compFunc, mid+1, j) 
            : mid 
          ) (compFunc(val, arr[mid]))
      ) (i + j >> 1);
}

///////// Tests ///////////////////

function check(arr, val, compFunc) {
  var fmt = JSON.stringify;
  var result = binarySearch(arr, val); // default compFunc is assumed
  console.log(`binarySearch(${fmt(arr)}, ${fmt(val)}) == ${fmt(result)}`);
  if (result > arr.length || result < 0 || !arr.length && result 
    || result < arr.length && compFunc(val, arr[result]) > 0
    || result > 0 && compFunc(val, arr[result-1]) < 0) throw "Unexpected result!!!"
}

// Tests with numeric data:
for (var val = 0; val < 12; val++)      
  check([1, 2, 4, 6, 9, 9, 10], val, (a,b) => a-b);
// Test with empty array:
check([], 12, (a,b) => a-b);
// Test with string data:
check(['abc', 'deaf', 'def', 'g'], 'dead', (a, b) => a.localeCompare(b));

  • It would be good to simplify the code so that beginners can understand. – Kiran Mohan Feb 17 '17 at 19:15
  • I wanted to give a version that builds on ES6 features. What don't you understand about it? – trincot Feb 17 '17 at 19:43
  • 1
    Ironic. This may be the most elegant solution, but the exhaustive function call overhead and over-extensive branching make this pretty slow, and by far the most memory-inefficient because each inner layer it has to go through creates a lot of new variables. – Jack Giffin Jul 7 '17 at 16:27
0

I've just found this splice implementation in code review, so I feel that it is important to clarify how bad this implementation is.

First of all BinarySearch is algorithm which in O(log(n)) in sorted array finds an index where we can insert our item and still have sorted array (we can use it also to find closest item - so to answer some question in comments - there is a sense to return a value - it can be different value from what you are querying)

In splice implementation there is major design failure - searching algorithm modifies queried array. Imagine that you have a database and you querySELECT * FROM data WHERE id=1 and half of your table is removed. Cloning array before passing to BinarySearch is not very helpful, but I will explain why in next paragraph.

So lets fix this design failure and use a new function slice which would work the same as splice but it wouldn't modify array (just return selected elements). There is still a big flaw in the algorithm. For n=2^m array we make m tests. After first we would return from slice n/2 elements, next time n/4, then n/8 and so on. If we sum this up it will be n-1 elements. So we have O(n) algorithm and it is as fast as linear search, but much more complicated (linear search is even faster, because its average cost is n/2 and slice BinarySearch is aways n-1). The original splice implementation is even worse - each splice would need additionally move elements in the table, so in worst case first time it would be n second n/2 third n/4 so in the end it would be 2 * n - 1 - and this is why cloning array is not very helpful (cloning is O(n) so never clone your array before passing to good binary search algorithm)

  • 2
    Maybe say at the end what you suggest to do instead? Do you like one of the other answers here? – Julix Aug 6 '17 at 2:57
  • 1
    Very useful comment but not an answer. – 7vujy0f0hy Jun 29 '18 at 16:55
0

function binarySearch(arr, num, l, r){
	if( arr instanceof Array ){
  	
    l = isNaN(l) ? 0 : l;
    r = isNaN(r) ? arr.length - 1: r;
    let mid = l + 1 + Math.round((r - l)/2 - 1);    
    console.log(l, r, mid, arr[mid]);
    
    if( num == arr[mid] ){ 
    	console.log("found"); 
      return mid; 
    }
    
    if( typeof arr[mid] == "undefined" || l == r ){
    	console.log("not found"); return -1;
    }
    
    if( num < arr[mid] ){  
    	console.log("take left"); 
      return binarySearch(arr, num, l, r - mid);
    }
    
    console.log("take right");
    return binarySearch(arr, num, mid, r);
    
  }
}

console.log( binarySearch([0, 0, 1 ,1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 11], 2) );

  • Silent errors dig one's own grave (notice how the function only executes if( arr instanceof Array )). Sure, at first it seems nice: smaller file size. But, the silent errors slowly coalesce into a venomous snake. One day out of the blue, this metaphorical snake lashes out and strikes you down by making your program not work. But, the worst is yet to come: the metaphorical venom seeps into your veins and makes you terribly ill, preventing you from finding the source of the problem in your code. With your final breaths taken in agony and despair, you now regret all the silent errors you used – Jack Giffin Nov 27 '18 at 22:14
0

Let's assume the array is sorted (either write ur own sorted algorithm or just use inbuilt methods)

function bSearch(array,item){
  var start = 0,
  end = item.length - 1;
  var middle = Math.floor((end+start)/2);
  while(array[middle] !== item && start < end){
    if(item < array[middle]){
      end = middle-1;
     }
    else if(item > array[middle]){
      start = middle+1;
     }
     middle = Math.floor((end+start)/2);

  } 
  if(array[item]!== middle){
     console.log('notFoundMate);
     return -1;
  }
  else {
     console.log('FoundMate);
     return middle;
  }
}
0

I want to add my searchArray binary search function, together with tool utility functions insertSortedArray and removeSortedArray to the list of answers, as I think it's clean, it is of global usage and I think it is quite speed optimal.

  • 1
    then add it? :P - I'm pretty sure the answer to the question is supposed to be contained here in the answer on SO, no? – Julix Aug 6 '17 at 2:59
  • its in a github gist. I use this not only for stackoverflow, but as a general solution. Please lookup the code there and decide what to do with it. – ikrabbe Sep 4 '17 at 11:00
  • So you're saying it may well change, thus link is better solution, as reader will see the most up to date version? – Julix Sep 5 '17 at 7:12
  • It won't change quite likely because that algorithm is very basic standard and I guess I implemented it in a quite minimal, understandable and fast way. It is jus tmy reference point for a leak I miss in javascript. – ikrabbe Oct 5 '17 at 15:30
0

Just check lodash implementation here

0

to use it, just copy paste it as-is, to use local variables for speed. and modify the searched value like if you search in sub objects or arrays:

if (array[mid][0] < value[0]) low = mid + 1;
if (array[mid].val < value.val) low = mid + 1;

for faster results use arrays or arrays of arrays or parallel arrays, copy searched arrays to local variables. nonlocal variables or each time you do obj.something it slows down.

this is the fastest version is like this:

let array=[3,4,5,6]
let value=5; //searched value
let mid, low = 0,high = array.length;
while (low < high) {
    mid = low + high >>> 1; // fast divide by 2 and round down
    if (array[mid] < value) low = mid + 1;
    else high = mid;
}
//if (array[mid] != value) mid=-1;// this might not be required if you look for place to insert new value
mid;// contains the found value position or if not found one before where it would be if it was found

binary search works like this:

|           .           |     // find middle
//option 1:
|           .     v     |     // if value on right, middle is top
            |     .     |     // so then it is like this
//option 2:                    
|     v     .           |     // if value on left, middle is bottom
|     .     |                 // so then it is like this
//more loops of option 2 until not found
|  .  |                       // next time it will be like this
|. |                          // next time it will be like this
.                             // next time it will be like this

this implementation goes to the bottom if not found. it could be found or not found always. it returns the index below or equals to the searched value. so you need to check if it equals. to validate if the value exists or it is just one result below. if you are looking for a place to insert inn order just put at that place, no need to check if equals

0

I think below option is simple to implement binary search in JS.

arr = [1,2,3,4,5];
searchTerm=2;
function binarySearchInJS(start,end)
{
    isFound=false;
    if(end > start)
    {
        //console.log(start+"\t"+end)
        mid =  (end+start)/2;

        mid = Math.floor(mid)

        if(searchTerm==arr[mid])
        {                   
              isFound = true;             
        }
        else
        {   

            if(searchTerm < arr[mid])
            {               
                binarySearchInJS(start,mid);
            }
            if(searchTerm > arr[mid])
            {           
                binarySearchInJS(mid+1,end);
            }
        }
    }

    if(isFound)
    {
        return "Success";   
    }
    else{
            return "Not Found"; 
    }       
}
0

Full featured binarySearch:

  • Negative value is indicate the insertion point
  • Allow to search first and last index
  • start index, exclusive end index
  • Custom compare function

(this code and unit test here)

function defaultCompare(o1, o2) {
    if (o1 < o2) {
        return -1;
    }
    if (o1 > o2) {
        return 1;
    }
    return 0;
}

/**
 * @param array sorted array with compare func
 * @param item search item
 * @param start (optional) start index
 * @param end (optional) exclusive end index
 * @param compare (optional) custom compare func
 * @param bound (optional) (-1) first index; (1) last index; (0) doesn't matter
 */
function binarySearch(array, item, start, end, compare, bound) {
    if (!compare) {
        compare = defaultCompare;
    }
    let from = start == null ? 0 : start;
    let to = (end == null ? array.length : end) - 1;
    let found = -1;
    while (from <= to) {
        const middle = (from + to) >>> 1;
        const compareResult = compare(array[middle], item);
        if (compareResult < 0) {
            from = middle + 1;
        }
        else if (compareResult > 0) {
            to = middle - 1;
        }
        else if (!bound) {
            return middle;
        }
        else if (bound < 0) {
            // First occurrence:
            found = middle;
            to = middle - 1;
        }
        else {
            // Last occurrence:
            found = middle;
            from = middle + 1;
        }
    }
    return found >= 0 ? found : -from - 1;
}
-2

You can't use binary search for unsorted array. you should have [1, 4, 13, 77 ...] but not [1, 2, 13, 5, 17 ...] ... my bad, you did sort()

  • 1
    Please contribute a meaningful answer that contributes to the question asked instead of trying to point out flaws in it. Judging based on your edit history, I would say that you never should have posted this as an answer, instead reserving yourself to commenting, or (because you have too low reputation to comment), you should not have posted anything at all. And, in addition to that, you should have deleted your answer/comment when you realized that it was flawed instead of editing it into something even more off-topic. – Jack Giffin Aug 5 '17 at 20:57

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