3

After a lot of searching, I've come across a few ways to remove newlines using sed or tr

sed ':a;N;$!ba;s/\n//g'

tr -d '\n'

However, I can't find a way to exclude the action from specific lines. I've learned that one can use the "!" in sed as a means to exclude an address from a subsequent action, but I can't figure out how to incorporate it into the sed command above. Here's an example of what I'm trying to resolve.

I have a file formatted as such:

>sequence_ID_1
atcgatcgggatc
aatgacttcattg
gagaccgaga
>sequence_ID_2
gatccatggacgt
ttaacgcgatgac
atactaggatcag
at

I want the file formatted in this fashion:

>sequence_ID_1
atcgatcgggatcaatgacttcattggagaccgaga
>sequence_ID_2
gatccatggacgtttaacgcgatgacatactaggatcagat

I've been focusing on trying to exclude lines containing the ">" character, as this is the only constant regex that would exist on lines that have the ">" character (note: the sequence_ID_n is unique to each entry preceded by the ">" and, thus, cannot be relied upon for regex matching).

I've attempted this:

sed ':a;N;$!ba;/^>/!s/\n//g' file.txt > file2.txt

It runs without generating an error, but the output file is the same as the original.

Maybe I can't do this with sed? Maybe I'm approaching this problem incorrectly? Should I be trying to define a range of lines to operate on (i.e. only lines between lines beginning with ">")?

I'm brand new to basic text manipulation, so any suggestions are greatly, greatly appreciated!

3

This awk should work:

$ awk '/^>/{print (NR==1)?$0:"\n"$0;next}{printf "%s", $0}END{print ""}' file
>sequence_ID_1
atcgatcgggatcaatgacttcattggagaccgaga
>sequence_ID_2
gatccatggacgtttaacgcgatgacatactaggatcagat
  • 1
    Thanks so much for the quick response and solution! I'm going to dive deeper into the copy of the O'Reilly sed & awk book I have to come to a complete understanding of how/what's happening here. – kubu4 Mar 28 '14 at 17:01
2

This might work for you (GNU sed):

sed ':a;N;/^>/M!s/\n//;ta;P;D' file

Remove newlines from lines that don't begin with a >.

  • +1, because it uses sed and it works, but my brain is still hurting from trying to understand. – mklement0 Mar 28 '14 at 15:44
  • Thanks for the sed solution! This looks crazy and I'm excited to tease apart how it works! – kubu4 Mar 28 '14 at 17:05
1

Using GNU sed:

sed -r ':a;/^[^>]/{$!N;s/\n([^>])/\1/;ta}' inputfile

For your input, it'd produce:

>sequence_ID_1
atcgatcgggatcatgacttcattgagaccgaga
>sequence_ID_2
gatccatggacgttaacgcgatgactactaggatcagt
  • Great (and mind-bending), but you're dropping the first non-> char. in your substitution; also, it seems that the P;D is not necessary; thus: sed -r ':a;/^[^>]/{$!N;s/\n([^>])/\1/;ta}' inputfile – mklement0 Mar 28 '14 at 5:06
  • @mklement0 Thanks. I was, indeed, dropping the first character. – devnull Mar 28 '14 at 5:16
  • 1
    With some -e acrobatics you can also make this work with BSD (OSX) sed: sed -E -e ':a' -e '/^[^>]/{$!N;s/\n([^>])/\1/; ta' -e '}' inputfile. – mklement0 Mar 28 '14 at 12:43
  • Thanks @mklement0 for the OSX info. Most of my lab mates use OSX, so this will come in handy for them! – kubu4 Mar 28 '14 at 17:24
1

As @1_CR already said @jaypal's solution is a good way to do it. But I really could not resist to try it in pure Bash. See the comments for details:

The input data:

$ cat input.txt
>sequence_ID_1
atcgatcgggatc
aatgacttcattg
gagaccgaga
>sequence_ID_2
gatccatggacgt
ttaacgcgatgac
atactaggatcag
at
>sequence_ID_20
gattaca

The script:

$ cat script
#!/usr/bin/env bash

# Bash 4 - read the data line by line into an array
readarray -t data < "$1"

# Bash 3 - read the data line by line into an array
#while read line; do
#    data+=("$line")
#done < "$1"

# A search pattern
pattern="^>sequence_ID_[0-9]"

# An array to insert the revised data
merged=()

# A counter
counter=0

# Iterate over each item in our data array
for item in "${data[@]}"; do

    # If an item matches the pattern
    if [[ "$item" =~ $pattern ]]; then

        # Add the item straight into our new array
        merged+=("$item")

        # Raise the counter in order to write the next
        # possible non-matching item to a new index
        (( counter++ ))

        # Continue the loop from the beginning - skip the
        # rest of the code inside the loop for now since it 
        # is not relevant after we have found a match.
        continue
    fi

    # If we have a match in our merged array then
    # raise the counter one more time in order to
    # get a new index position
    [[ "${merged[$counter]}" =~ $pattern ]] && (( counter++ ))

    # Add a non matching value to the already existing index
    # currently having the highest index value based on the counter
    merged[$counter]+="$item"
done

# Test: Echo each item of our merged array
printf "%s\n" "${merged[@]}"

The result:

$ ./script input.txt

>sequence_ID_1
atcgatcgggatcaatgacttcattggagaccgaga
>sequence_ID_2
gatccatggacgtttaacgcgatgacatactaggatcagat
>sequence_ID_20
gattaca
  • Thanks for this alternative and particularly for the line comments! Extremely useful for understanding how it all works! – kubu4 Mar 28 '14 at 17:17
  • You are welcome. I refined the comments a little bit and added an alternative way to read the lines into an array with Bash 3. – Saucier Mar 29 '14 at 0:48
0

Jaypal's solution is the way to go, here's a GNU awk variant

awk -v RS='>sequence[^\\n]+\\n' 
'{gsub("\n", "");printf "%s%s%s", $0, NR==1?"":"\n", RT}'  file
>sequence_ID_1
atcgatcgggatcaatgacttcattggagaccgaga
>sequence_ID_2
gatccatggacgtttaacgcgatgacatactaggatcagat
0

Here is one way to do it with awk

awk '{printf (/^>/&&NR>1?RS:"")"%s"(/^>/?RS:""),$0}' file
>sequence_ID_1
atcgatcgggatcaatgacttcattggagaccgaga
>sequence_ID_2
gatccatggacgtttaacgcgatgacatactaggatcagat

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