14

Is it possible to read frames from a video in steps (eg I want to read every fifth frame of a video stream). Currently I'm doing this as a workaround but it's not very effecient.

bool bSuccess
int FramesSkipped = 5;
 for (int a = 0;  < FramesSkipped; a++)
      bSuccess = cap.read(NextFrameBGR);

Any suggestions so I do not have to loop through the five frames to get the desired frame?

18

I'm afraid there's not much you can do and it's not just a shortcoming of OpenCV. You see, modern video codecs, are, generally, complex beasts. To get a higher compression rate the encoding of a frame is often dependent on previous and sometimes even successive frames.

So, most of the time you have to decode frames before the desired one even if you don't need them.

There are rather non-trivial tricks to specifically encode a video file, so that it would be cheap to get every Nth frame, but it's not feasible in general case.

That said, you can try the seeking functionality OpenCV provides (see OpenCV Seek Function/Rewind). It may (as well as may not) work faster depending on the circumstances. However, personally, I wouldn't bet on it.

  • I am no expert so might be very wrong, but is it possible to skip intermediate P and B-frames upto the last I-frame before the frame needed? – saurabheights Feb 20 '17 at 8:32
  • 1
    Probably, it does something like this with the mentioned seeking functions. But I don't think there's an API in OpenCV for such fine-grained operation on the codec level. – Sergei Nosov Mar 17 '17 at 10:18
  • thank you. I finally choose to use ffmpeg to extract key frames. Found that none of the frame extracted from opencv had as good quality as ffmpeg. – saurabheights Mar 17 '17 at 10:56
7

I've had success in Python 3 using a simple counter and setting the capture to that counter's frame, as follows:

import cv2

cap = cv2.VideoCapture('XYZ.avi')
count = 0

while cap.isOpened():
    ret, frame = cap.read()

    if ret:
        cv2.imwrite('frame{:d}.jpg'.format(count), frame)
        count += 30 # i.e. at 30 fps, this advances one second
        cap.set(1, count)
    else:
        cap.release()
        break

I've tried to find a way to make this a little more pythonic using a with statement but I don't believe the CV2 library has been updated for it.

6

I got it to work in Python... See below for two sample use cases and some caveats.

First, import some packages

import cv2
import math
import numpy as np

Capture every n seconds (here, n = 5)

#################### Setting up the file ################
videoFile = "Jumanji.mp4"
vidcap = cv2.VideoCapture(videoFile)
success,image = vidcap.read()

#################### Setting up parameters ################

seconds = 5
fps = vidcap.get(cv2.CAP_PROP_FPS) # Gets the frames per second
multiplier = fps * seconds

#################### Initiate Process ################

while success:
    frameId = int(round(vidcap.get(1))) #current frame number, rounded b/c sometimes you get frame intervals which aren't integers...this adds a little imprecision but is likely good enough
    success, image = vidcap.read()

    if frameId % multiplier == 0:
        cv2.imwrite("FolderSeconds/frame%d.jpg" % frameId, image)

vidcap.release()
print "Complete"

Alternatively, capture every n frames (here, n = 10)

#################### Setting up the file ################
videoFile = "Jumanji.mp4"
vidcap = cv2.VideoCapture(videoFile)
success,image = vidcap.read()

#################### Setting up parameters ################

#OpenCV is notorious for not being able to good to 
# predict how many frames are in a video. The point here is just to 
# populate the "desired_frames" list for all the individual frames
# you'd like to capture. 

fps = vidcap.get(cv2.CAP_PROP_FPS)
est_video_length_minutes = 3         # Round up if not sure.
est_tot_frames = est_video_length_minutes * 60 * fps  # Sets an upper bound # of frames in video clip

n = 5                             # Desired interval of frames to include
desired_frames = n * np.arange(est_tot_frames) 


#################### Initiate Process ################

for i in desired_frames:
    vidcap.set(1,i-1)                      
    success,image = vidcap.read(1)         # image is an array of array of [R,G,B] values
    frameId = vidcap.get(1)                # The 0th frame is often a throw-away
    cv2.imwrite("FolderFrames/frame%d.jpg" % frameId, image)

vidcap.release()
print "Complete"

That's pretty much it.


Some unfortunante caveats...depending on your version of opencv (this is built for opencv V3), you may need to set the fps variable differently. See here for details. To find out your version, you can do the following:

(major_ver, minor_ver, subminor_ver) = (cv2.__version__).split('.')
major_ver
  • In your second example, you could use cv2.CAP_PROP_FRAME_COUNT to have the exact frame count and avoid calucalting it. Also, can you explain the purpose of n * np.arange(est_tot_frames)? It doesn't seem to do what it's supposed to. – StephaneMombuleau Aug 10 '16 at 22:16
  • While helpful at getting to a solution, this answer doesn't get at question regarding nth frames. – benJephunneh Sep 23 '18 at 5:19
  • This will be very slow! Bad Idea – Tessaracter Oct 16 '18 at 13:09
1

Here is what I suggest:

     CvCapture* capture = cvCaptureFromFile("input_video_path");
     int loop = 0;
     IplImage* frame = NULL;
     Mat matframe;                                                                   
     char fname[20];                                                                 
     do {
        frame = cvQueryFrame(capture);  
        matframe = cv::cvarrToMat(frame);
        cvNamedWindow("video_frame", CV_WINDOW_AUTOSIZE);                                 
        cvShowImage("video_frame", frame);
        sprintf(fname, "frame%d.jpg", loop);
        cv::imwrite(fname, matframe);//save each frame locally
        loop++;
        cvWaitKey(100);
     } while( frame != NULL );

Now that you have saved all the frames locally you can quickly read the nth frame that you want.
CATUION:A sample video of 12 secs I had was composed of >200 images. This will eat up lot of space.

A simple yet effective optimization will be to read the nth frame using the approach that you are using or the one suggested by @sergie. After this you can save the image with its index so that later query at same index will return the saved image rather than having to skip frames like you are. This way you will save the space that you would have wasted in saving frames that you wouldn't have queried and time taken to read & save those unwanted frames aswell.

  • 1
    I'm running 130 1-minute samples of 4K video, I promise you this is a very bad idea! – Allan Nørgaard Mar 11 '16 at 8:49
1

When I had the same goal with OpenCV, I just tuned around the number of "keyframes" I wanted per second of video, regardless of the frame rate or total number of frames. So, this gets me the N-th key given my target KPS.

# python3.6 code using OpenCV 3.4.2

import cv2
KPS = 5 # Target Keyframes Per Second
VIDEO_PATH = "path/to/video/folder" # Change this
IMAGE_PATH = "path/to/image/folder" # ...and this 
EXTENSION = ".png"

cap = cv2.VideoCapture(VIDEO_PATH)
    # Set frames-per-second for capture
    fps = round(cap.get(cv2.CAP_PROP_FPS))
    hop = round(fps / KPS)
    curr_frame = 0
    while(True):
        ret, frame = cap.read()
        if not ret: break
        if curr_frame % hop == 0:
            print('Creating... {0}'.format(name,))
            name = IMAGE_PATH + "_" + str(curr_frame) + EXTENSION
            cv2.imwrite(name, frame)
        curr_frame += 1
    cap.release()

Note that I'm rolling through all the frames, but only writing the N-th frame using hop as N.

0

It is not possible to extract random frames as the encoding scheme is generally extremely complex. For example in MPEG-4, Only the information containing the difference between two frames is stored, Hence clearly the previous frames are required.

0

I encountered the same problem. All i did was this:

import cv2

vs = cv2.VideoCapture("<path of your video>.mp4")

print("Showing frames...")
c=1
while True:

    grabbed, frame = vs.read()
    if c%5==0:
        cv2.imshow('Frame',frame)
        cv2.waitKey(1)
    c+=1

vs.release()

Hope this helps.

0

I use this repo!

Main idea is:

main.py

from camera import VideoCam
SKIPFRAME = 8
url = 0
v1 = VideoCam(url)
v1.check_camera(v1.cap)
ct = 0
while True:
    ct += 1
    try:
        ret = v1.cap.grab()
        if ct % SKIPFRAME == 0:  # skip some frames
            ret, frame = v1.get_frame()
            if not ret:
                v1.restart_capture(v1.cap)
                v1.check_camera(v1.cap)
                continue
            # frame HERE
            v1.show_frame(frame, 'frame')
    except KeyboardInterrupt:
        v1.close_cam()
        exit(0)

camera.py

import cv2
import logging


class VideoCam():
    def __init__(self, url=0):
        self.url = url
        self.cap = cv2.VideoCapture(self.url)
        self.get_frame()
        self.get_frame_read()
        logging.basicConfig(format='%(asctime)s %(message)s', level=logging.INFO)

    def check_camera(self, cap):
        logging.info('Camera {} status: {}'.format(self.url, cap.isOpened()))

    def show_frame(self, frame, name_fr='NAME'):
        cv2.imshow(name_fr, frame)
        # cv2.imshow(name_fr, cv2.resize(frame, (0, 0), fx=0.4, fy=0.4))
        cv2.waitKey(1)


    def get_frame(self):
        return self.cap.retrieve()

    def get_frame_read(self):
        return self.cap.read()

    def close_cam(self):
        self.cap.release()
        cv2.destroyAllWindows()

    def restart_capture(self, cap):
        cap.release()
        self.cap = cv2.VideoCapture(self.url)

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