34

Is it possible to read frames from a video in steps (eg I want to read every fifth frame of a video stream). Currently I'm doing this as a workaround but it's not very effecient.

bool bSuccess
int FramesSkipped = 5;
 for (int a = 0;  < FramesSkipped; a++)
      bSuccess = cap.read(NextFrameBGR);

Any suggestions so I do not have to loop through the five frames to get the desired frame?

13 Answers 13

34

I've had success in Python 3 using a simple counter and setting the capture to that counter's frame, as follows:

import cv2

cap = cv2.VideoCapture('XYZ.avi')
# For streams:
#   cap = cv2.VideoCapture('rtsp://url.to.stream/media.amqp')
# Or e.g. most common ID for webcams:
#   cap = cv2.VideoCapture(0)
count = 0

while cap.isOpened():
    ret, frame = cap.read()

    if ret:
        cv2.imwrite('frame{:d}.jpg'.format(count), frame)
        count += 30 # i.e. at 30 fps, this advances one second
        cap.set(cv2.CAP_PROP_POS_FRAMES, count)
    else:
        cap.release()
        break

I've tried to find a way to make this a little more pythonic using a with statement but I don't believe the CV2 library has been updated for it.

4
  • 2
    It would be clearer to use cap.set(cv2.CAP_PROP_POS_FRAMES, count) instead of cap.set(1, count)
    – chanban
    Jul 4, 2021 at 16:25
  • Please feel free to contribute the edit, @chanban. Admittedly, I was coming at this as a beginner, trying to figure this out for my own purposes. Oct 24, 2021 at 21:11
  • 1
    Thanks a lot @benJephunneh, your answer helped me a lot!. I just added the recommended property value and some example values, as I think the OP might refer to frame synchronization issues, so it might be of value to know that this is not only applicable to media files, but also to real camera setups, where synchronization is needed if image processing takes too much time to process all frames.
    – Marcel H.
    Oct 26, 2021 at 12:00
  • I have to point out that setting the frame is much slower than actually reading all the frames Jul 19 at 12:33
32

I'm afraid there's not much you can do and it's not just a shortcoming of OpenCV. You see, modern video codecs, are, generally, complex beasts. To get a higher compression rate the encoding of a frame is often dependent on previous and sometimes even successive frames.

So, most of the time you have to decode frames before the desired one even if you don't need them.

There are rather non-trivial tricks to specifically encode a video file, so that it would be cheap to get every Nth frame, but it's not feasible in general case.

That said, you can try the seeking functionality OpenCV provides (see OpenCV Seek Function/Rewind). It may (as well as may not) work faster depending on the circumstances. However, personally, I wouldn't bet on it.

3
  • I am no expert so might be very wrong, but is it possible to skip intermediate P and B-frames upto the last I-frame before the frame needed? Feb 20, 2017 at 8:32
  • 1
    Probably, it does something like this with the mentioned seeking functions. But I don't think there's an API in OpenCV for such fine-grained operation on the codec level. Mar 17, 2017 at 10:18
  • thank you. I finally choose to use ffmpeg to extract key frames. Found that none of the frame extracted from opencv had as good quality as ffmpeg. Mar 17, 2017 at 10:56
14

I got it to work in Python... See below for two sample use cases and some caveats.

# First, import some packages

import cv2
import math
import numpy as np

# Make sure that the print function works on Python 2 and 3
from future import print_function

# Capture every n seconds (here, n = 5) 

#################### Setting up the file ################
videoFile = "Jumanji.mp4"
vidcap = cv2.VideoCapture(videoFile)
success, image = vidcap.read()

#################### Setting up parameters ################

seconds = 5
fps = vidcap.get(cv2.CAP_PROP_FPS) # Gets the frames per second
multiplier = fps * seconds

#################### Initiate Process ################

while success:
    frameId = int(round(vidcap.get(1))) #current frame number, rounded b/c sometimes you get frame intervals which aren't integers...this adds a little imprecision but is likely good enough
    success, image = vidcap.read()

    if frameId % multiplier == 0:
        cv2.imwrite("FolderSeconds/frame%d.jpg" % frameId, image)
        
vidcap.release()
print("Complete")

# Alternatively, capture every n frames (here, n = 10)


#################### Setting up the file ################
videoFile = "Jumanji.mp4"
vidcap = cv2.VideoCapture(videoFile)
success, image = vidcap.read()

#################### Setting up parameters ################

#OpenCV is notorious for not being able to good to 
# predict how many frames are in a video. The point here is just to 
# populate the "desired_frames" list for all the individual frames
# you'd like to capture. 

fps = vidcap.get(cv2.CAP_PROP_FPS)
est_video_length_minutes = 3         # Round up if not sure.
est_tot_frames = est_video_length_minutes * 60 * fps  # Sets an upper bound # of frames in video clip

n = 5                             # Desired interval of frames to include
desired_frames = n * np.arange(est_tot_frames) 


#################### Initiate Process ################

for i in desired_frames:
    vidcap.set(1, i-1)                      
    success, image = vidcap.read(1)         # image is an array of array of [R,G,B] values
    frameId = vidcap.get(1)                # The 0th frame is often a throw-away
    cv2.imwrite("FolderFrames/frame%d.jpg" % frameId, image)

vidcap.release()
print("Complete")

That's pretty much it.


Some unfortunate caveats... depending on your version of `opencv` (this is built for `opencv` V3), you may need to set the fps variable differently. See [here][1] for details. To find out your version, you can do the following:
major_ver, minor_ver, subminor_ver = cv2.__version__.split('.')
print(major_ver)
3
  • 1
    In your second example, you could use cv2.CAP_PROP_FRAME_COUNT to have the exact frame count and avoid calucalting it. Also, can you explain the purpose of n * np.arange(est_tot_frames)? It doesn't seem to do what it's supposed to.
    – mombul
    Aug 10, 2016 at 22:16
  • While helpful at getting to a solution, this answer doesn't get at question regarding nth frames. Sep 23, 2018 at 5:19
  • 1
    This will be very slow! Bad Idea
    – Trect
    Oct 16, 2018 at 13:09
8

I encountered the same problem. All i did was this:

import cv2

vs = cv2.VideoCapture("<path of your video>.mp4")

print("Showing frames...")
c=1
while True:

    grabbed, frame = vs.read()
    if c%5==0:
        cv2.imshow('Frame',frame)
        cv2.waitKey(1)
    c+=1

vs.release()
1

Here is what I suggest:

     CvCapture* capture = cvCaptureFromFile("input_video_path");
     int loop = 0;
     IplImage* frame = NULL;
     Mat matframe;                                                                   
     char fname[20];                                                                 
     do {
        frame = cvQueryFrame(capture);  
        matframe = cv::cvarrToMat(frame);
        cvNamedWindow("video_frame", CV_WINDOW_AUTOSIZE);                                 
        cvShowImage("video_frame", frame);
        sprintf(fname, "frame%d.jpg", loop);
        cv::imwrite(fname, matframe);//save each frame locally
        loop++;
        cvWaitKey(100);
     } while( frame != NULL );

Now that you have saved all the frames locally you can quickly read the nth frame that you want.
CATUION:A sample video of 12 secs I had was composed of >200 images. This will eat up lot of space.

A simple yet effective optimization will be to read the nth frame using the approach that you are using or the one suggested by @sergie. After this you can save the image with its index so that later query at same index will return the saved image rather than having to skip frames like you are. This way you will save the space that you would have wasted in saving frames that you wouldn't have queried and time taken to read & save those unwanted frames aswell.

1
  • 1
    I'm running 130 1-minute samples of 4K video, I promise you this is a very bad idea! Mar 11, 2016 at 8:49
1

When I had the same goal with OpenCV, I just tuned around the number of "keyframes" I wanted per second of video, regardless of the frame rate or total number of frames. So, this gets me the N-th key given my target KPS.

# python3.6 code using OpenCV 3.4.2

import cv2
KPS = 5 # Target Keyframes Per Second
VIDEO_PATH = "path/to/video/folder" # Change this
IMAGE_PATH = "path/to/image/folder" # ...and this 
EXTENSION = ".png"

cap = cv2.VideoCapture(VIDEO_PATH)
    # Set frames-per-second for capture
    fps = round(cap.get(cv2.CAP_PROP_FPS))
    hop = round(fps / KPS)
    curr_frame = 0
    while(True):
        ret, frame = cap.read()
        if not ret: break
        if curr_frame % hop == 0:
            print('Creating... {0}'.format(name,))
            name = IMAGE_PATH + "_" + str(curr_frame) + EXTENSION
            cv2.imwrite(name, frame)
        curr_frame += 1
    cap.release()

Note that I'm rolling through all the frames, but only writing the N-th frame using hop as N.

1

I use this repo!

Main idea is:

main.py

from camera import VideoCam
SKIPFRAME = 8
url = 0
v1 = VideoCam(url)
v1.check_camera(v1.cap)
ct = 0
while True:
    ct += 1
    try:
        ret = v1.cap.grab()
        if ct % SKIPFRAME == 0:  # skip some frames
            ret, frame = v1.get_frame()
            if not ret:
                v1.restart_capture(v1.cap)
                v1.check_camera(v1.cap)
                continue
            # frame HERE
            v1.show_frame(frame, 'frame')
    except KeyboardInterrupt:
        v1.close_cam()
        exit(0)

camera.py

import cv2
import logging


class VideoCam():
    def __init__(self, url=0):
        self.url = url
        self.cap = cv2.VideoCapture(self.url)
        self.get_frame()
        self.get_frame_read()
        logging.basicConfig(format='%(asctime)s %(message)s', level=logging.INFO)

    def check_camera(self, cap):
        logging.info('Camera {} status: {}'.format(self.url, cap.isOpened()))

    def show_frame(self, frame, name_fr='NAME'):
        cv2.imshow(name_fr, frame)
        # cv2.imshow(name_fr, cv2.resize(frame, (0, 0), fx=0.4, fy=0.4))
        cv2.waitKey(1)


    def get_frame(self):
        return self.cap.retrieve()

    def get_frame_read(self):
        return self.cap.read()

    def close_cam(self):
        self.cap.release()
        cv2.destroyAllWindows()

    def restart_capture(self, cap):
        cap.release()
        self.cap = cv2.VideoCapture(self.url)
1

You should use the grab function to move to next frame. And only use retrieve to decode the frame you need.

bool bSuccess
int FramesSkipped = 5;
for (int a = 0;  < FramesSkipped; a++)
      bSuccess = cap.grab();
bSuccess = cap.retrieve(NextFrameBGR);
1

if anyone will need to capture every 5th frame and save it as jpg, based on Ishan Shah's code:

import cv2

vid = cv2.VideoCapture('C:/python_works/creatives_gardenscapes/0c52b83ed1dec617092aaf83278f12ad.mp4')

if not os.path.exists('images'):
    os.makedirs('images')

index = 0
while(True):
    ret, frame = vid.read()
    if not ret: 
        break
    name = 'C:/python_works/creatives_gardenscapes/frames/0c52b83ed1dec617092aaf83278f12ad' + str(index) + '.jpg'
    if index%50==0:
        cv2.imwrite(name, frame)
    index += 1
0

It is not possible to extract random frames as the encoding scheme is generally extremely complex. For example in MPEG-4, Only the information containing the difference between two frames is stored, Hence clearly the previous frames are required.

0

code:

import cv2
vidcap = cv2.VideoCapture('bali.mp4')
success,image = vidcap.read()

fps = vidcap.get(cv2.CAP_PROP_FPS)
print('video fps :', fps)
length = int(vidcap.get(cv2.CAP_PROP_FRAME_COUNT))
print( 'total frames :', length )

count = 0
skip = 10 

success = True
while success:
  success,image = vidcap.read()
  if count%skip==0:
    print(count)
    cv2.imwrite("frames/frame%d.jpg" % count, image)     # save frame as JPEG file
  if cv2.waitKey(10) == 27:                     # exit if Escape is hit
      break
  count += 1

output:

enter image description here

0

You can effectively "skip" a frame by reading it then discarding it. Granted, this does exactly not what you are asking, but might still suffice as a work-around. Obviously this has implications on performance but may be adequate for your purposes.

vs = cv2.videoCapture('/my/clip.mp4')

for i in (thing):
    # Read a frame
    _, frame = vs.read()
    # Skip the frame you just read by reading another
    _, frame = vs.read()
    # Run a process on said frame
    cv2.imshow("Window", frame)  
    

vs.release()
-2

Skipping frames in cv2 python

cap = cv2.VideoCapture(0)
x = 0
   while True:
      ret, frame = cap.read()

      gray = cv2.cvtColor(frame,cv2.COLOR_BGR2GRAY)
      blurred = cv2.GaussianBlur(gray,(7, 7), 0)
      (T, thresh) = cv2.threshold(blurred, 135, 255, cv2.THRESH_BINARY)
      contours, hierarchy=cv2.findContours(thresh,cv2.RETR_EXTERNAL,cv2.CHAIN_APPROX_SIMPLE)
      contours = sorted(contours, key=cv2.contourArea, reverse=True)[:10]

      for contour in contours:
         area = cv2.contourArea(contour)
         if(x != 0):
               x -= 1
               break
         if(area >= 517000 and area <= 522000):

               holdFrame = frame
               results = yourAlgorithm(holdFrame) # Your Algorithm Here
               x = 3
      if cv2.waitKey(1) & 0xFF == ord('q'):
         break


   cv2.waitKey(0)
   cv2.destroyAllWindows()

In the Code Above, I have done 3 things totally, that solved my problem

  1. Capturing Frames and initializing the variable x = 0
  2. Then if my required area of contour is detected I run my algorithm.
  3. After running the algorithm I set my x = 3
  4. Then next time my function goes to trigger my algorithm, it checks if x != 0, while x = 3 so it breaks out of the loop twice while decrementing the value of x by 1 each time. So, when the value of x becomes 0, approximately 3,4 frames have been skipped.
1
  • 1
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    Jul 18 at 17:25

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