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For instance, two keys are used to encrypt a plain text and the same keys are used to decrypt the encrypted message or the cipher-text, regardless of the order of how keys are used in encrypting or decrypting a message.As per my understanding it seems like a symmetric cryptography scheme should be used because the same keys are used to encrypt and decrypt the message, but I am not sure if the order of key usage matters or not. Is there a different scheme which should/can be used for this example? Thanks for your answers in advance!

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As per my understanding it seems like a symmetric cryptography scheme should be used because the same keys are used to encrypt and decrypt the message, but I am not sure if the order of key usage matters or no

If I am reading this correctly, you should use either (1) a stream cipher since the encryption is an XOR with the key stream; or (2) a block cipher whose mode performs a XOR with the plain text. You might need to ensure the block cipher always uses the forward transformation of the cipher for both encryption and decryption (for example, CTR mode).

The tricky thing here is to avoid forming a group. That is, you don't want something such that E_1(E_2(m)) == E_3(m). I think its easy to form a group using (1) and (2) above. If you go with a block cipher in a mode like CBC (e.g., 3-key TDEA or triple-DES), then you won't form a group. But you won't get that associativity property you are looking for either.

You could probably do it with public key cryptography too. But you would probably need to choose, for example, one of the RSA exponents to be 1 so its the identity function. There's some other things you could do in RSA, but you're likely to have something equivalent to the identity element to ensure the pre-image and image are within bounds of the resulting composite modulus.

Damien_The_Unbeliever had a good suggestion: move this over to crypto.stackexchange.com. There's a lot of talent in that exchange.

  • XOR works but doesn't offer security. There are a couple of modular exponentiation based constructions which fit the OP's requirements and are secure. – CodesInChaos Mar 28 '14 at 9:35
  • CodesInChaos - not sure what you mean about XOR. Is it a general comment about stream ciphers? At worst, the two operations would form a group so you essentially have a single stream cipher using a single key. Or am I missing something? – jww Mar 28 '14 at 9:39
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    Stream ciphers are not secure when used in the context of commutative encryption because an attacker who learns all of P xor K1, P xor K2 and P xor K1 xor K2 can solve this for P. An attacker learns these when the cipher is used in the three-pass protocol which is the stereotypical application of commutative encryption. – CodesInChaos Mar 28 '14 at 9:47
  • Will that condition ever arise? The attacker only gets to see P xor K1 xor K2. Saying he gets to see it all is like saying an attacker can recover the plain text if they get the cipher text and key. – jww Mar 28 '14 at 9:50
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    Then why do you need commutative encryption in the first place? Typically you'd with Alice having the plaintext, encrypting it, sending it to Bob (so eve sees P xor KA) Bob encrypts it again and sends it back (Eve sees P xor KA xor KB) and Alice decrypts it and sends it to bob again (Eve sees P xor KB) and Bob now decrypts the message. This kind of protocol is secure with Shamir's scheme, but not with XOR. Read the wikipedia page I linked for additional information. – CodesInChaos Mar 28 '14 at 10:24

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