1

I have a dataset generated in this way:

 aa = linspace(A - 5, A + 5, n_points)
 bb = linspace(B - 1.5, B + 1.5, n_points)
 z = []
 for a in aa:
     for b in bb:
         z.append(cost([a, b]))

I would like and head map where z define the color in the point (a,b) . I need this to analyze local minimum.

I am using matplotlib but I do not know exactly how to proceed.

5

Typically you'd use imshow or pcolormesh for this.

For example:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

n_points = 10
aa = np.linspace(-5, 5, n_points)
bb = np.linspace(-1.5, 1.5, n_points)

def cost(a, b):
    return a + b

z = []
for a in aa:
    for b in bb:
        z.append(cost(a, b))

z = np.reshape(z, [len(aa), len(bb)])

fig, ax = plt.subplots()
im = ax.pcolormesh(aa, bb, z)
fig.colorbar(im)

ax.axis('tight')
plt.show()

enter image description here

However, it would be better to write your example code as:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

n_points = 10
a = np.linspace(-5, 5, n_points)
b = np.linspace(-1.5, 1.5, n_points)
a, b = np.meshgrid(b, a)

z = a + b # Vectorize your cost function

fig, ax = plt.subplots()
im = ax.pcolormesh(a, b, z)
fig.colorbar(im)

ax.axis('tight')
plt.show()

Or, even more compactly:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

npoints = 10
b, a = np.mgrid[-5:5:npoints*1j, -1.5:1.5:npoints*1j]

z = a + b

fig, ax = plt.subplots()
im = ax.pcolormesh(a, b, z)
fig.colorbar(im)

ax.axis('tight')
plt.show()
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  • @Jeo I have a doubt here. If i do not know the a and b coordinates which i have to pull from data file itself, in that case how do we give ? Suppose i have to data set with gps co ordinates of distributed city. – user3964336 Mar 17 '15 at 7:28
  • Why is ax.axis('tight') necessary? Thanks :) – tommy.carstensen Dec 15 '15 at 14:37
  • @tommy.carstensen - By default, matplotlib will choose "even" numbers for the axes limits. (Note: this will change to margins style padding in 2.0.) ax.axis('tight') specifies that the axes limits should exactly match the data limits. In this case, we're not wanting to display regions where we don't have data, so we use ax.axis('tight'). – Joe Kington Dec 15 '15 at 14:52
-1

I just did something similar, and I used a Scatter plot.

plt.scatter(x_vals, y_vals, s = 100,  c = z_vals, cmap = 'rainbow')
c = plt.colorbar()
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