25

Is there a query I can run to show currently assigned privileges on a particular schema?

i.e. privileges that were assigned like so:

GRANT USAGE ON SCHEMA dbo TO MyUser

I have tried

SELECT *
FROM information_schema.usage_privileges;

but this only returns grants to the built-in PUBLIC role. Instead, I want to see which users have been granted privileges on the various schema.

Note: I'm actually using Amazon Redshift rather than pure PostgreSQL, although I will accept a pure PostgreSQL answer if this is not possible in Amazon Redshift. (Though I suspect it is)

  • Check out what psql does when you do a \dp viewname query, by running psql with the -E flag. Should get you started. I don't use Redshift, so not pursuing further. – Craig Ringer Mar 29 '14 at 2:30
13

The privileges are stored in the nspacl field of pg_namespace. Since it's an array field, you have to do a little fancy coding to parse it. This query will give you the grant statements used for users and groups:

select 
'grant ' || substring(
          case when charindex('U',split_part(split_part(array_to_string(nspacl, '|'),pu.usename,2 ) ,'/',1)) > 0 then ',usage ' else '' end 
          ||case when charindex('C',split_part(split_part(array_to_string(nspacl, '|'),pu.usename,2 ) ,'/',1)) > 0 then ',create ' else '' end 
       , 2,10000)
|| ' on schema '||nspname||' to "'||pu.usename||'";' 
from pg_namespace pn,pg_user pu
 where  array_to_string(nspacl,',') like '%'||pu.usename||'%' --and pu.usename='<username>' 
and nspowner > 1 
union
select 
'grant ' || substring(
          case when charindex('U',split_part(split_part(array_to_string(nspacl, '|'),pg.groname,2 ) ,'/',1)) > 0 then ',usage ' else '' end 
          ||case when charindex('C',split_part(split_part(array_to_string(nspacl, '|'),pg.groname,2 ) ,'/',1)) > 0 then ',create ' else '' end 
       , 2,10000)
|| ' on schema '||nspname||' to group "'||pg.groname||'";' 
from pg_namespace pn,pg_group pg
 where array_to_string(nspacl,',') like '%'||pg.groname||'%' --and pg.groname='<username>' 
 and nspowner > 1 
  • That is fantastic, thanks! – mwrichardson Mar 31 '14 at 8:33
  • 1
    Maybe I'm crazy, but I don't seem to have charindex on my 9.4 installation. Is this some sort of custom function? – killthrush Mar 11 '16 at 13:26
  • 3
    No, it's not a custom function. Looks like you are referring to Postgres as opposed to Redshift which has it. In Postgres I believe it was deprecated and the equivalent function is strpos. – mike_pdb Mar 12 '16 at 0:54
  • Not working on Postgresql 9.5.4 – Basil Musa Aug 29 '18 at 9:42
29

in console util psql:

\dn+

will show you

     Name      |  Owner   |   Access privileges   |      Description   
11

List all schemas with their priveleges for current user:

WITH "names"("name") AS (
  SELECT n.nspname AS "name"
    FROM pg_catalog.pg_namespace n
      WHERE n.nspname !~ '^pg_'
        AND n.nspname <> 'information_schema'
) SELECT "name",
  pg_catalog.has_schema_privilege(current_user, "name", 'CREATE') AS "create",
  pg_catalog.has_schema_privilege(current_user, "name", 'USAGE') AS "usage"
    FROM "names";

The response will be for example:

  name   | create | usage 
---------+--------+-------
 public  | t      | t
 test    | t      | t
 awesome | f      | f
(3 rows)

In this example current user is not owner of the awesome schema.

As you could guess, similar request for particular schema:

SELECT
  pg_catalog.has_schema_privilege(
    current_user, 'awesome', 'CREATE') AS "create",
  pg_catalog.has_schema_privilege(
    current_user, 'awesome', 'USAGE') AS "usage";

and response:

 create | usage 
--------+-------
 f      | f

As you know, it's possible to use pg_catalog.current_schema() for current schema.

Of all the possible privileges

-- SELECT
-- INSERT
-- UPDATE
-- DELETE
-- TRUNCATE
-- REFERENCES
-- TRIGGER
-- CREATE
-- CONNECT
-- TEMP
-- EXECUTE
-- USAGE

the only CREATE and USAGE allowed for schemas.

Like the current_schema() the current_user can be replaced with particular role.


BONUS with current column

WITH "names"("name") AS (
  SELECT n.nspname AS "name"
    FROM pg_catalog.pg_namespace n
      WHERE n.nspname !~ '^pg_'
        AND n.nspname <> 'information_schema'
) SELECT "name",
  pg_catalog.has_schema_privilege(current_user, "name", 'CREATE') AS "create",
  pg_catalog.has_schema_privilege(current_user, "name", 'USAGE')  AS "usage",
  "name" = pg_catalog.current_schema() AS "current"
    FROM "names";

--   name   | create | usage | current
-- ---------+--------+-------+---------
--  public  | t      | t     | t
--  test    | t      | t     | f
--  awesome | f      | f     | f
-- (3 rows)

WITH | System Information Functions | GRANT (privileges)

  • 1
    Worked for me, but is the RECURSIVE keyword doing anything nontrivial there? The PostgreSQL docs seem to imply that a truly "recursive" query should have a UNION in it. – user1071847 Mar 9 '17 at 21:44
  • 1
    @user1071847, sure. RECURSIVE is unnecessary here. Thanks for pointing out. – Ivan Black Jun 23 '17 at 22:30
6

Try this one (works for PUBLIC role):

SELECT nspname,
       coalesce(nullif(role.name,''), 'PUBLIC') AS name,
       substring(
          CASE WHEN position('U' in split_part(split_part((','||array_to_string(nspacl,',')), ','||role.name||'=',2 ) ,'/',1)) > 0 THEN ', USAGE' ELSE '' END 
          || CASE WHEN position('C' in split_part(split_part((','||array_to_string(nspacl,',')), ','||role.name||'=',2 ) ,'/',1)) > 0 THEN ', CREATE' ELSE '' END 
       , 3,10000) AS privileges
FROM pg_namespace pn, (SELECT pg_roles.rolname AS name
   FROM pg_roles UNION ALL SELECT '' AS name) AS role
 WHERE (','||array_to_string(nspacl,',')) LIKE '%,'||role.name||'=%'
 AND nspowner > 1;
5

Combined version (groups, users, PUBLIC) that works for AWS Redshift:

    SELECT *
FROM (SELECT CASE
               WHEN charindex ('U',SPLIT_PART(SPLIT_PART(ARRAY_TO_STRING(nspacl,'|'),pu.usename,2),'/',1)) > 0 THEN ' USAGE'
               ELSE ''
             END ||case WHEN charindex('C',SPLIT_PART(SPLIT_PART(ARRAY_TO_STRING(nspacl,'|'),pu.usename,2),'/',1)) > 0 THEN ' CREATE' ELSE '' END AS rights,
             nspname AS schema,
             '' AS role,
             pu.usename AS user
      FROM pg_namespace pn,
           pg_user pu
      WHERE ARRAY_TO_STRING(nspacl,',') LIKE '%' ||pu.usename|| '%'
      --and pu.usename='<username>' 
      AND   nspowner > 1

  UNION

      SELECT CASE
               WHEN charindex ('U',SPLIT_PART(SPLIT_PART(ARRAY_TO_STRING(nspacl,'|'),pg.groname,2),'/',1)) > 0 THEN ' USAGE '
               ELSE ''
             END ||case WHEN charindex('C',SPLIT_PART(SPLIT_PART(ARRAY_TO_STRING(nspacl,'|'),pg.groname,2),'/',1)) > 0 THEN ' CREATE' ELSE '' END as rights,
             nspname AS schema,
             pg.groname AS role,
             '' AS user
      FROM pg_namespace pn,
           pg_group pg
      WHERE ARRAY_TO_STRING(nspacl,',') LIKE '%' ||pg.groname|| '%'
      --and pg.groname='<username>' 
      AND   nspowner > 1

  UNION

      SELECT CASE
               WHEN POSITION('U' IN SPLIT_PART(SPLIT_PART((',' ||array_to_string (nspacl,',')),',' ||roles.name|| '=',2),'/',1)) > 0 THEN ' USAGE'
               ELSE ''
             END 
      || CASE
               WHEN POSITION('C' IN SPLIT_PART(SPLIT_PART((',' ||array_to_string (nspacl,',')),',' ||roles.name|| '=',2),'/',1)) > 0 THEN ' CREATE'
               ELSE ''
             END AS rights,
             nspname AS schema,
             COALESCE(NULLIF(roles.name,''),'PUBLIC') AS role,
             '' AS user
      FROM pg_namespace pn,
           (SELECT pg_group.groname AS name
            FROM pg_group
            UNION ALL
            SELECT '' AS name) AS roles
      WHERE (',' ||array_to_string (nspacl,',')) LIKE '%,' ||roles.name|| '=%'
      AND   nspowner > 1) privs

ORDER BY schema,rights
4

This is what psql uses internally :)

SELECT n.nspname AS "Name",
  pg_catalog.pg_get_userbyid(n.nspowner) AS "Owner",
  pg_catalog.array_to_string(n.nspacl, E'\n') AS "Access privileges",
  pg_catalog.obj_description(n.oid, 'pg_namespace') AS "Description"
FROM pg_catalog.pg_namespace n
WHERE n.nspname !~ '^pg_' AND n.nspname <> 'information_schema'
ORDER BY 1;
0

I know this post is old but I made another query based on the different answers to have one that is short and easy to use afterward :

select
    nspname as schema_name
    , r.rolname as role_name
    , pg_catalog.has_schema_privilege(r.rolname, nspname, 'CREATE') as create_grant
    , pg_catalog.has_schema_privilege(r.rolname, nspname, 'USAGE') as usage_grant
from pg_namespace pn,pg_catalog.pg_roles r
where array_to_string(nspacl,',') like '%'||r.rolname||'%' 
    and nspowner > 1 

I keep thinking one day I will make a query to have all rights in only one view... One day. ;)

  • I just think it is more readable than the previous answer (less string manipulation) and compliant with pure PostgreSQL code. And it is directly 'queriable' if you put it into a view. For example : SELECT * FROM new_view WHERE usage_grant = true; – Jaisus Apr 12 at 9:42
  • In fact I have even shorter, I edit my code right away. – Jaisus Apr 12 at 10:31
0

For current question can try this one:

SELECT r.rolname AS role_name,
       n.nspname AS schema_name,
       p.perm AS privilege
FROM pg_catalog.pg_namespace AS n
    CROSS JOIN pg_catalog.pg_roles AS r
    CROSS JOIN (VALUES ('USAGE'), ('CREATE')) AS p(perm)
WHERE has_schema_privilege(r.oid, n.oid, p.perm)
--      AND n.nspname <> 'information_schema'
--      AND n.nspname !~~ 'pg\_%'
--      AND NOT r.rolsuper

Could be pretty low in performance at database with a lot of objects and users with which I have come across. So i've got possible workaround using aclexplode() default function like this:

SELECT  oid_to_rolname(a.grantee) AS role_name,
        n.nspname AS schema_name,
        a.privilege_type AS privilege_type
FROM pg_catalog.pg_namespace AS n,
        aclexplode(nspacl) a
WHERE n.nspacl IS NOT NULL 
        AND oid_to_rolname(a.grantee) IS NOT NULL 
--      AND n.nspname <> 'information_schema'
--      AND n.nspname !~~ 'pg\_%'

But, be careful, last one doesn't include privileges which users have obtained from PUBLIC role. Where oid_to_rolname() is simple custom function SELECT rolname FROM pg_roles WHERE oid = $1.

And, like @Jaisus, my task required to have all privileges which all users have. So i have similar to schema privileges queries for table, views, columns, sequences, functions, database and even default privileges.

Also, there is helpful extension pg_permission where I get logic for provided queries and just upgraded it for my purposes.

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