45

Before I ask, Cron Jobs and Task Scheduler will be my last options, this script will be used across Windows and Linux and I'd prefer to have a coded out method of doing this than leaving this to the end user to complete.

Is there a library for Python that I can use to schedule tasks? I will need to run a function once every hour, however, over time if I run a script once every hour and use .sleep, "once every hour" will run at a different part of the hour from the previous day due to the delay inherent to executing/running the script and/or function.

What is the best way to schedule a function to run at a specific time of day (more than once) without using a Cron Job or scheduling it with Task Scheduler?

Or if this is not possible, I would like your input as well.

AP Scheduler fit my needs exactly.

Version < 3.0

import datetime
import time
from apscheduler.scheduler import Scheduler

# Start the scheduler
sched = Scheduler()
sched.daemonic = False
sched.start()

def job_function():
    print("Hello World")
    print(datetime.datetime.now())
    time.sleep(20)

# Schedules job_function to be run once each minute
sched.add_cron_job(job_function,  minute='0-59')

out:

>Hello World
>2014-03-28 09:44:00.016.492
>Hello World
>2014-03-28 09:45:00.0.14110

Version > 3.0

(From Animesh Pandey's answer below)

from apscheduler.schedulers.blocking import BlockingScheduler

sched = BlockingScheduler()

@sched.scheduled_job('interval', seconds=10)
def timed_job():
    print('This job is run every 10 seconds.')

@sched.scheduled_job('cron', day_of_week='mon-fri', hour=10)
def scheduled_job():
    print('This job is run every weekday at 10am.')

sched.configure(options_from_ini_file)
sched.start()
  • 1
    The only sensible way would be to use a cron job or Windows scheduled task. There should be no reason you leave it up to the end user to do this: script the creation of the cron job/task on installation. – Duncan Mar 28 '14 at 14:12
  • 2
    Things to consider: 1. What happens if your function takes longer than a minute/hour: do you start the second instance or do you wait for the first instance to complete or do you cancel the second instance completely (skip the interval)? 2. What happens if the computer time jumps back/forward (DST or a manual change): do you repeat/skip the corresponding executions? 3. What happens if the computer wakes up from hibernation: do you start the task immediately or wait for the next cycle to run? 4. Do you know how cron, Task Scheduler, APScheduler behave in those cases? – jfs Mar 28 '14 at 16:02
  • Did you yourself trigger the script at first or it runs on it's own? if that's the case isn't it results in a lot of memory consumption and cpu usage... – Tyto Aug 24 '18 at 10:57
49

Maybe this can help: Advanced Python Scheduler

Here's a small piece of code from their documentation:

from apscheduler.schedulers.blocking import BlockingScheduler

def some_job():
    print "Decorated job"

scheduler = BlockingScheduler()
scheduler.add_job(some_job, 'interval', hours=1)
scheduler.start()
  • 3
    This is the answer to my problems it looks like, so simple and easy to use. I've appended some test code to my reply. Thanks again. – sunshinekitty Mar 28 '14 at 14:49
  • 3
    This syntax is no longer up to date – Jared Beach Nov 9 '15 at 18:25
  • 3
    This works with apscheduler version < 3.x Could someone give us a simple example like this but with 3.x version? – toscanelli Dec 30 '15 at 10:51
  • 1
    OK, so the scheduler started after I run the command python test_scheduler.py from DOS, so how do I stop it? Only by pressing Ctrl+C? Is there anyway to make the scheduler stop after running 100 times? Or at a specific time say at 18:00? How do you specify it in the script. I searched but found no one mentions how to stop it. – StayFoolish Sep 8 '17 at 9:02
23

To run something every 10 minutes past the hour.

from datetime import datetime, timedelta

while 1:
    print 'Run something..'

    dt = datetime.now() + timedelta(hours=1)
    dt = dt.replace(minute=10)

    while datetime.now() < dt:
        time.sleep(1)
  • This is an alternative to apscheduler based code. Works well with raspberry Pi. – Ferdin Joe Mar 14 at 2:36
17

For apscheduler < 3.0, see Unknown's answer.

For apscheduler > 3.0

from apscheduler.schedulers.blocking import BlockingScheduler

sched = BlockingScheduler()

@sched.scheduled_job('interval', seconds=10)
def timed_job():
    print('This job is run every 10 seconds.')

@sched.scheduled_job('cron', day_of_week='mon-fri', hour=10)
def scheduled_job():
    print('This job is run every weekday at 10am.')

sched.configure(options_from_ini_file)
sched.start()

Update:

apscheduler documentation.

This for apscheduler-3.3.1 on Python 3.6.2.

"""
Following configurations are set for the scheduler:

 - a MongoDBJobStore named “mongo”
 - an SQLAlchemyJobStore named “default” (using SQLite)
 - a ThreadPoolExecutor named “default”, with a worker count of 20
 - a ProcessPoolExecutor named “processpool”, with a worker count of 5
 - UTC as the scheduler’s timezone
 - coalescing turned off for new jobs by default
 - a default maximum instance limit of 3 for new jobs
"""

from pytz import utc
from apscheduler.schedulers.blocking import BlockingScheduler
from apscheduler.jobstores.sqlalchemy import SQLAlchemyJobStore
from apscheduler.executors.pool import ProcessPoolExecutor

"""
Method 1:
"""
jobstores = {
    'mongo': {'type': 'mongodb'},
    'default': SQLAlchemyJobStore(url='sqlite:///jobs.sqlite')
}
executors = {
    'default': {'type': 'threadpool', 'max_workers': 20},
    'processpool': ProcessPoolExecutor(max_workers=5)
}
job_defaults = {
    'coalesce': False,
    'max_instances': 3
}

"""
Method 2 (ini format):
"""
gconfig = {
    'apscheduler.jobstores.mongo': {
        'type': 'mongodb'
    },
    'apscheduler.jobstores.default': {
        'type': 'sqlalchemy',
        'url': 'sqlite:///jobs.sqlite'
    },
    'apscheduler.executors.default': {
        'class': 'apscheduler.executors.pool:ThreadPoolExecutor',
        'max_workers': '20'
    },
    'apscheduler.executors.processpool': {
        'type': 'processpool',
        'max_workers': '5'
    },
    'apscheduler.job_defaults.coalesce': 'false',
    'apscheduler.job_defaults.max_instances': '3',
    'apscheduler.timezone': 'UTC',
}

sched_method1 = BlockingScheduler() # uses overrides from Method1
sched_method2 = BlockingScheduler() # uses same overrides from Method2 but in an ini format


@sched_method1.scheduled_job('interval', seconds=10)
def timed_job():
    print('This job is run every 10 seconds.')


@sched_method2.scheduled_job('cron', day_of_week='mon-fri', hour=10)
def scheduled_job():
    print('This job is run every weekday at 10am.')


sched_method1.configure(jobstores=jobstores, executors=executors, job_defaults=job_defaults, timezone=utc)
sched_method1.start()

sched_method2.configure(gconfig=gconfig)
sched_method2.start()
  • 2
    What does this line mean? sched.configure(options_from_ini_file) what is the ini_file and how do you configure it? – zsad512 Aug 27 '17 at 20:41
  • @zsad512 I added examples and references to answer your question. – Animesh Pandey Sep 27 '17 at 17:41
1

On the version posted by sunshinekitty called "Version < 3.0" , you may need to specify apscheduler 2.1.2 . I accidentally had version 3 on my 2.7 install, so I went:

pip uninstall apscheduler
pip install apscheduler==2.1.2

It worked correctly after that. Hope that helps.

  • 2
    Right, the version in the post is referring to apscheduler version, not python version. – sunshinekitty Sep 9 '16 at 23:35
0

The Python standard library does provide sched and threading for this task. But this means your scheduler script will have be running all the time instead of leaving its execution to the OS, which may or may not be what you want.

  • would be nice to see a demo. – Aaron Hall Mar 28 '14 at 15:05
  • There are examples in the docs I linked. And I bet googling them yields even more. – aepsil0n Mar 28 '14 at 15:06
  • Ah, so you don't want upvotes, and you'd prefer the possibility of being flagged for link-only answers? – Aaron Hall Mar 28 '14 at 15:07
  • 3
    Uhm, no I'm not really hunting upvotes, just wanted provide some pointers. It's just that I don't quite see the need to provide a completely fleshed out example, when there are so many available. Especially since OP has already settled on another solution. – aepsil0n Mar 28 '14 at 15:10
  • Yes, some code here would've been helpful, but here: stackoverflow.com/questions/3393612/… import threading def printit(): threading.Timer(5.0, printit).start() print "Hello, World!" printit() – FredFury Sep 25 '16 at 10:22
0

One option is to write a C/C++ wrapper that executes the python script on a regular basis. Your end-user would run the C/C++ executable, which would remain running in the background, and periodically execute the python script. This may not be the best solution, and may not work if you don't know C/C++ or want to keep this 100% python. But it does seem like the most user-friendly approach, since people are used to clicking on executables. All of this assumes that python is installed on your end user's computer.

Another option is to use cron job/Task Scheduler but to put it in the installer as a script so your end user doesn't have to do it.

  • why use C/C++ when we can use Python? – Tyto Aug 24 '18 at 10:49
0
   #For scheduling task execution
import schedule
import time

def job():
    print("I'm working...")

schedule.every(1).minutes.do(job)
#schedule.every().hour.do(job)
#schedule.every().day.at("10:30").do(job)
#schedule.every(5).to(10).minutes.do(job)
#schedule.every().monday.do(job)
#schedule.every().wednesday.at("13:15").do(job)
#schedule.every().minute.at(":17").do(job)

while True:
    schedule.run_pending()
    time.sleep(1)

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