114

Before Java 8 when we split on empty string like

String[] tokens = "abc".split("");

split mechanism would split in places marked with |

|a|b|c|

because empty space "" exists before and after each character. So as result it would generate at first this array

["", "a", "b", "c", ""]

and later will remove trailing empty strings (because we didn't explicitly provide negative value to limit argument) so it will finally return

["", "a", "b", "c"]

In Java 8 split mechanism seems to have changed. Now when we use

"abc".split("")

we will get ["a", "b", "c"] array instead of ["", "a", "b", "c"].

My first guess was that maybe now leading empty strings are also removed just like trailing empty strings.

But this theory fails, since

"abc".split("a")

returns ["", "bc"], so leading empty string was not removed.

Can someone explain what is going on here? How rules of split have changed in Java 8?

9
  • Java8 seems to fix that. Meanwhile, s.split("(?!^)") seems to work. Oct 21, 2014 at 12:49
  • 3
    @shkschneider Behaviour described in my question is not a bug of pre Java-8 versions. This behaviour was not particularly very useful, but it still was correct (as shown in my question), so we can't say that it was "fixed". I see it more like improvement so we could use split("") instead of cryptic (for people who don't use regex) split("(?!^)") or split("(?<!^)") or few others regexes.
    – Pshemo
    Oct 21, 2014 at 14:31
  • 1
    Encountered same issue after upgraded fedora to Fedora 21, fedora 21 ships with JDK 1.8, and my IRC game application is broken because of this. Dec 16, 2014 at 7:26
  • 8
    This question seems to be the only documentation of this breaking change in Java 8. Oracle left it out of their list of incompatibilities. Jun 1, 2015 at 19:22
  • 5
    This change in the JDK just cost me 2 hours of tracking down what is wrong. The code runs fine in my computer (JDK8) but fails mysteriously on another machine (JDK7). Oracle REALLY SHOULD update the documentation of String.split(String regex), rather than in Pattern.split or String.split(String regex, int limit) as this is by far the most common usage. Java is known for its portability aka so-called WORA. This is a major backward-breaking change and not well documented at all. Oct 4, 2015 at 1:11

3 Answers 3

87

The behavior of String.split (which calls Pattern.split) changes between Java 7 and Java 8.

Documentation

Comparing between the documentation of Pattern.split in Java 7 and Java 8, we observe the following clause being added:

When there is a positive-width match at the beginning of the input sequence then an empty leading substring is included at the beginning of the resulting array. A zero-width match at the beginning however never produces such empty leading substring.

The same clause is also added to String.split in Java 8, compared to Java 7.

Reference implementation

Let us compare the code of Pattern.split of the reference implemetation in Java 7 and Java 8. The code is retrieved from grepcode, for version 7u40-b43 and 8-b132.

Java 7

public String[] split(CharSequence input, int limit) {
    int index = 0;
    boolean matchLimited = limit > 0;
    ArrayList<String> matchList = new ArrayList<>();
    Matcher m = matcher(input);

    // Add segments before each match found
    while(m.find()) {
        if (!matchLimited || matchList.size() < limit - 1) {
            String match = input.subSequence(index, m.start()).toString();
            matchList.add(match);
            index = m.end();
        } else if (matchList.size() == limit - 1) { // last one
            String match = input.subSequence(index,
                                             input.length()).toString();
            matchList.add(match);
            index = m.end();
        }
    }

    // If no match was found, return this
    if (index == 0)
        return new String[] {input.toString()};

    // Add remaining segment
    if (!matchLimited || matchList.size() < limit)
        matchList.add(input.subSequence(index, input.length()).toString());

    // Construct result
    int resultSize = matchList.size();
    if (limit == 0)
        while (resultSize > 0 && matchList.get(resultSize-1).equals(""))
            resultSize--;
    String[] result = new String[resultSize];
    return matchList.subList(0, resultSize).toArray(result);
}

Java 8

public String[] split(CharSequence input, int limit) {
    int index = 0;
    boolean matchLimited = limit > 0;
    ArrayList<String> matchList = new ArrayList<>();
    Matcher m = matcher(input);

    // Add segments before each match found
    while(m.find()) {
        if (!matchLimited || matchList.size() < limit - 1) {
            if (index == 0 && index == m.start() && m.start() == m.end()) {
                // no empty leading substring included for zero-width match
                // at the beginning of the input char sequence.
                continue;
            }
            String match = input.subSequence(index, m.start()).toString();
            matchList.add(match);
            index = m.end();
        } else if (matchList.size() == limit - 1) { // last one
            String match = input.subSequence(index,
                                             input.length()).toString();
            matchList.add(match);
            index = m.end();
        }
    }

    // If no match was found, return this
    if (index == 0)
        return new String[] {input.toString()};

    // Add remaining segment
    if (!matchLimited || matchList.size() < limit)
        matchList.add(input.subSequence(index, input.length()).toString());

    // Construct result
    int resultSize = matchList.size();
    if (limit == 0)
        while (resultSize > 0 && matchList.get(resultSize-1).equals(""))
            resultSize--;
    String[] result = new String[resultSize];
    return matchList.subList(0, resultSize).toArray(result);
}

The addition of the following code in Java 8 excludes the zero-length match at the beginning of the input string, which explains the behavior above.

            if (index == 0 && index == m.start() && m.start() == m.end()) {
                // no empty leading substring included for zero-width match
                // at the beginning of the input char sequence.
                continue;
            }

Maintaining compatibility

Following behavior in Java 8 and above

To make split behaves consistently across versions and compatible with the behavior in Java 8:

  1. If your regex can match zero-length string, just add (?!\A) at the end of the regex and wrap the original regex in non-capturing group (?:...) (if necessary).
  2. If your regex can't match zero-length string, you don't need to do anything.
  3. If you don't know whether the regex can match zero-length string or not, do both the actions in step 1.

(?!\A) checks that the string does not end at the beginning of the string, which implies that the match is an empty match at the beginning of the string.

Following behavior in Java 7 and prior

There is no general solution to make split backward-compatible with Java 7 and prior, short of replacing all instance of split to point to your own custom implementation.

4
  • Any idea how I can change split("") code so that it is consistent across across different java versions?
    – Daniel
    Oct 29, 2015 at 22:22
  • 2
    @Daniel: It's possible to make it forward-compatible (follow the behavior of Java 8) by adding (?!^) to the end of the regex and wrap the original regex in non-capturing group (?:...) (if necessary), but I can't think of any way to make it backward-compatible (follow the old behavior in Java 7 and prior).
    – nhahtdh
    Oct 30, 2015 at 3:50
  • Thanks for the explanation. Could you describe "(?!^)"? In what scenarios it will be different from ""? (I am terrible at regex! :-/).
    – Daniel
    Oct 31, 2015 at 3:44
  • 1
    @Daniel: Its meaning is affected by Pattern.MULTILINE flag, while \A always matches at the beginning of the string regardless of flags.
    – nhahtdh
    Nov 2, 2015 at 2:38
31

This has been specified in the documentation of split(String regex, limit).

When there is a positive-width match at the beginning of this string then an empty leading substring is included at the beginning of the resulting array. A zero-width match at the beginning however never produces such empty leading substring.

In "abc".split("") you got a zero-width match at the beginning so the leading empty substring is not included in the resulting array.

However in your second snippet when you split on "a" you got a positive width match (1 in this case), so the empty leading substring is included as expected.

(Removed irrelevant source code)

8
  • 3
    It's just a question. Is it okay to post a fragment of code from the JDK? Remember the copyright problem with Google - Harry Potter - Oracle? Mar 28, 2014 at 17:24
  • 6
    @PaulVargas To be fair I don't know but I assume it's ok since you can download the JDK, and unzip the src file which contains all the sources. So technically everybody could see the source.
    – Alexis C.
    Mar 28, 2014 at 17:28
  • 12
    @PaulVargas The "open" in "open source" does stand for something. Mar 28, 2014 at 17:49
  • 2
    @ZouZou: just because everybody can see it doesn't mean you can re-publish it
    – user102008
    May 14, 2014 at 20:20
  • 2
    @Paul Vargas, IANAL but in many other occasions this type of a post falls under quote / fair use situation. More on the topic is here: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/12527/…
    – Alex Pakka
    May 16, 2014 at 5:16
14

There was a slight change in the docs for split() from Java 7 to Java 8. Specifically, the following statement was added:

When there is a positive-width match at the beginning of this string then an empty leading substring is included at the beginning of the resulting array. A zero-width match at the beginning however never produces such empty leading substring.

(emphasis mine)

The empty string split generates a zero-width match at the beginning, so an empty string is not included at the start of the resulting array in accordance with what is specified above. By contrast, your second example which splits on "a" generates a positive-width match at the start of the string, so an empty string is in fact included at the start of the resulting array.

4
  • A few more seconds made ​​the difference. Mar 28, 2014 at 17:11
  • 2
    @PaulVargas actually here arshajii posted answer few seconds before ZouZou, but unfortunately ZouZou answered my question earlier here. I was wondering if I should asked this question since I already knew an answer but it seemed interesting one and ZouZou deserved some reputation for his earlier comment.
    – Pshemo
    Mar 28, 2014 at 17:13
  • 5
    Despite the new behaviour looks more logical, it is obviously a backward compatibility break. The only justification for this change is that "some-string".split("") is a quite rare case.
    – ivstas
    Oct 29, 2014 at 6:45
  • 4
    .split("") is not the only way to split without matching anything. We used a positive lookahead regex which in jdk7 which also matched at the beginning and produced an empty head element which is now gone. github.com/spray/spray/commit/…
    – jrudolph
    Feb 10, 2015 at 10:59

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