140

Is there a built-in function that can round like the following?

10 -> 10
12 -> 10
13 -> 15
14 -> 15
16 -> 15
18 -> 20

14 Answers 14

257

I don't know of a standard function in Python, but this works for me:

Python 2

def myround(x, base=5):
    return int(base * round(float(x)/base))

Python3

def myround(x, base=5):
    return base * round(x/base)

It is easy to see why the above works. You want to make sure that your number divided by 5 is an integer, correctly rounded. So, we first do exactly that (round(float(x)/5) where float is only needed in Python2), and then since we divided by 5, we multiply by 5 as well. The final conversion to int is because round() returns a floating-point value in Python 2.

I made the function more generic by giving it a base parameter, defaulting to 5.

  • 3
    If only integers and rounding down, then you can also just do x // base * base – Tjorriemorrie Dec 20 '16 at 0:59
  • 5
    this is me being paranoid but I prefer to use floor() and ceil() rather than casting: base * floor(x/base) – user666412 Apr 5 '17 at 16:06
40

For rounding to non-integer values, such as 0.05:

def myround(x, prec=2, base=.05):
  return round(base * round(float(x)/base),prec)

I found this useful since I could just do a search and replace in my code to change "round(" to "myround(", without having to change the parameter values.

  • 1
    You can use: def my_round(x, prec=2, base=0.05): return (base * (np.array(x) / base).round()).round(prec) which accepts numpy arrays as well. – saubhik May 24 '18 at 18:21
19

It's just a matter of scaling

>>> a=[10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20]
>>> for b in a:
...     int(round(b/5.0)*5.0)
... 
10
10
10
15
15
15
15
15
20
20
20
12

Removing the 'rest' would work:

rounded = int(val) - int(val) % 5

If the value is aready an integer:

rounded = val - val % 5

As a function:

def roundint(value, base=5):
    return int(value) - int(value) % int(base)
  • This only works for rounding down. – Craig Nov 10 '17 at 17:21
  • I like this answer for rounding to the nearest fractional value. i.e. If i only want increments of 0.25. – jersey bean Dec 22 '17 at 20:17
8
def round_to_next5(n):
    return n + (5 - n) % 5
6

round(x[, n]): values are rounded to the closest multiple of 10 to the power minus n. So if n is negative...

def round5(x):
    return int(round(x*2, -1)) / 2

Since 10 = 5 * 2, you can use integer division and multiplication with 2, rather than float division and multiplication with 5.0. Not that that matters much, unless you like bit shifting

def round5(x):
    return int(round(x << 1, -1)) >> 1
  • 1
    +1 for showing us that round() can handle rounding to multiples other than 1.0, including higher values. (Note, however, that the bit-shifting approach won't work with floats, not to mention it's much less readable to most programmers.) – Peter Hansen Feb 16 '10 at 14:50
  • 1
    @Peter Hansen thanks for the +1. Need to have an int(x) for the bit shifting to work with floats. Agreed not the most readable and I wouldn't use it myself, but I did like the "purity" of it only involving 1's and not 2's or 5's. – pwdyson Feb 16 '10 at 22:26
4

Sorry, I wanted to comment on Alok Singhai's answer, but it won't let me due to a lack of reputation =/

Anyway, we can generalize one more step and go:

def myround(x, base=5):
    return base * round(float(x) / base)

This allows us to use non-integer bases, like .25 or any other fractional base.

3

Modified version of divround :-)

def divround(value, step, barrage):
    result, rest = divmod(value, step)
    return result*step if rest < barrage else (result+1)*step
  • so in this case you use divround(value, 5, 3)? or maybe divround(value, 5, 2.5)? – pwdyson Feb 16 '10 at 13:13
  • divround(value, 5, 3), exactly. – Christian Hausknecht Feb 16 '10 at 13:18
2

Use:

>>> from __future__ import division   # This is only needed on Python 2
>>> def round_to_nearest(n, m):
        r = n % m
        return n + m - r if r + r >= m else n - r

...

It does not use multiplication and will not convert from/to floats.

Rounding to the nearest multiple of 10:

>>> for n in range(-21, 30, 3): print('{:3d}  =>  {:3d}'.format(n, round_to_nearest(n, 10)))
-21  =>  -20
-18  =>  -20
-15  =>  -10
-12  =>  -10
 -9  =>  -10
 -6  =>  -10
 -3  =>    0
  0  =>    0
  3  =>    0
  6  =>   10
  9  =>   10
 12  =>   10
 15  =>   20
 18  =>   20
 21  =>   20
 24  =>   20
 27  =>   30

As you can see, it works for both negative and positive numbers. Ties (e.g. -15 and 15) will always be rounded upwards.

A similar example that rounds to the nearest multiple of 5, demonstrating that it also behaves as expected for a different "base":

>>> for n in range(-21, 30, 3): print('{:3d}  =>  {:3d}'.format(n, round_to_nearest(n, 5)))
-21  =>  -20
-18  =>  -20
-15  =>  -15
-12  =>  -10
 -9  =>  -10
 -6  =>   -5
 -3  =>   -5
  0  =>    0
  3  =>    5
  6  =>    5
  9  =>   10
 12  =>   10
 15  =>   15
 18  =>   20
 21  =>   20
 24  =>   25
 27  =>   25
1

In case someone needs "financial rounding" (0.5 rounds always up):

def myround(x, base=5):
    roundcontext = decimal.Context(rounding=decimal.ROUND_HALF_UP)
    decimal.setcontext(roundcontext)
    return int(base *float(decimal.Decimal(x/base).quantize(decimal.Decimal('0'))))

As per documentation other rounding options are:

ROUND_CEILING (towards Infinity),
ROUND_DOWN (towards zero),
ROUND_FLOOR (towards -Infinity),
ROUND_HALF_DOWN (to nearest with ties going towards zero),
ROUND_HALF_EVEN (to nearest with ties going to nearest even integer),
ROUND_HALF_UP (to nearest with ties going away from zero), or
ROUND_UP (away from zero).
ROUND_05UP (away from zero if last digit after rounding towards zero would have been 0 or 5; otherwise towards zero)

By default Python uses ROUND_HALF_EVEN as it has some statistical advantages (the rounded results are not biased).

0

What about this:

 def divround(value, step):
     return divmod(value, step)[0] * step
0

Next multiple of 5

Consider 51 needs to be converted to 55:

code here

mark = 51;
r = 100 - mark;
a = r%5;
new_mark = mark + a;
0

Here is my C code. If I understand it correctly, it should supposed to be something like this;

#include <stdio.h>

int main(){
int number;

printf("Enter number: \n");
scanf("%d" , &number);

if(number%5 == 0)
    printf("It is multiple of 5\n");
else{
    while(number%5 != 0)
        number++;
  printf("%d\n",number);
  }
}

and this also rounds to nearest multiple of 5 instead of just rounding up;

#include <stdio.h>

int main(){
int number;

printf("Enter number: \n");
scanf("%d" , &number);

if(number%5 == 0)
    printf("It is multiple of 5\n");
else{
    while(number%5 != 0)
        if (number%5 < 3)
            number--;
        else
        number++;
  printf("nearest multiple of 5 is: %d\n",number);
  }
}
-3

You can “trick” int() into rounding off instead of rounding down by adding 0.5 to the number you pass to int().

  • 2
    This does not actually answer the question – Uri Agassi Apr 27 '14 at 19:24

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