21

I would like to end the scope of set.seed() after a specific line in order to have real randomization for the rest of the code. Here is an example in which I want set.seed() to work for "rnorm" (line 4), but not for "nrow" (line 9)

set.seed(2014)
f<-function(x){0.5*x+2}
datax<-1:100
datay<-f(datax)+rnorm(100,0,5)
daten<-data.frame(datax,datay)
model<-lm(datay~datax)
plot(datax,datay)
abline(model)
a<-daten[sample(nrow(daten),20),]
points(a,col="red",pch=16)
modela<-lm(a$datay~a$datax)
abline(modela, col="red")

Thanks for suggestions, indeed!

19

Simply use the current system time to "undo" the seed by introducing a new unique random seed:

set.seed(Sys.time())

If you need more precision, consider fetching the system timestamp by millisecond (use R's system(..., intern = TRUE) function).

0
32
set.seed(NULL)

See help documents - ?set.seed:

"If called with seed = NULL it re-initializes (see ‘Note’) as if no seed had yet been set."

10

set.seed() only works for the next execution. so what you want is already happening.

see this example

set.seed(12)
sample(1:15, 5)

[1] 2 12 13 4 15

sample(1:15, 5) # run the same code again you will see different results

[1] 1 3 9 15 12

set.seed(12)#set seed again to see first set of results
sample(1:15, 5)

[1] 2 12 13 4 15

1
  • 5
    Actually no. if you run set.seed(12), it starts some kind of loop of seeds. The second sample call will be identical all the time. Ex: Run once set.seed(12), s1a <- sample(1:15, 5), then s2a <- sample(1:15, 5). then run set.seed(12), s1b <- sample(1:15, 5), then s2b <- sample(1:15, 5) and you'll have identical(s1a, s1b)==TRUE and identical(s2a, s2b)==TRUE. This is also true for all subsequent sample calls. – Bastien Oct 9 '19 at 18:30
-1

set.seed() just works for the first line containing randomly sample, and will not influence the next following command. If you want it to work for the other lines, you must call the set.seed function with the same "seed"-the parameter.

2
  • 8
    Pseudo-randomness will not prevent the script from remaining deterministic. He wants it to be stochastic past a certain point. – Robert Krzyzanowski Mar 29 '14 at 8:09
  • That's not true, see the comment of @Bastien above. – hplieninger Jun 3 '20 at 15:05

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