5

Is the initialize method a built-in method in Ruby?

Why do we have to pass arguments when we create a new object, and why it goes directly to that initialize method? And, can we create a class without an initialize method?

1
5

You can consider the relationship between the Class#new method and each class's #initialize method to be implemented more or less like this:

class Class
  def new
    instance = allocate()

    instance.initialize

    return instance
  end
end

class Foo
  def initialize
    # Do nothing
  end
end

You can create a class without explicitly defining an #initialize method, because the #initialize method is defined by default to do nothing, and its return value is always ignored (regardless of what value you return).

The arguments you pass to Class#new are always passed directly to #initialize in the same order and format. For example:

class Class
  def new (arg1, arg2, &block_arg)
    instance = allocate()

    instance.initialize(arg1, arg2, &block_arg)

    return instance
  end
end

class MyClass
  def initialize (arg1, arg2, &block_arg)
    # Do something with args
  end
end
3

The logic behind creating new objects consists of two elements. First, you need to create a new object within the memory. This is done by calling allocate method on given class (it is defined on a Class class) - it takes no parameters and its only responsibility is to get a free slot from ruby memory heap slab, place a new object in that spot and return the object. The second step is to call initialize method on this newly created object - this is why initialize is an instance method rather then a class method.

The default initialize method is part of the language and it literally does nothing and takes no params.

new method is just a handy shorthand which first calls the allocate method, and then calls the initialize method (with all the passed params) on the object returned by the allocate method.

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