I am having a slight is regarding functions. I believe it is likely because I am not using them. My code is as follows:

/*date difference calculator*/

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
  int Date1 = 0, Date2 = 0, Dif, F, L, D1, D2, M1, M2, Y1, Y2;
  int x[13] = {0, 31, 28, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31};
  int y[13] = {0, 31, 28, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31};
  char A1, A2, B1, B2;

/*input first date*/

 fprintf (stderr , "Enter first date,in the form <day>/<month>/<year>  or <day>-<month>-<year>.\nWhere <day>,<month> and <year> are integers:\n");
 (scanf("%i%c%i%c%i", &D1, &A1, &M1, &B1, &Y1));

/*check first date*/

 if (!(Y1 % 4)) x[2]=29;
 while ((Y1 < 1 || (Y1 > 9999)) || (M1 < 1 || M1 > 12) || (D1 < 1 || D1 > x[M1]) || (A1 != B1) || ((A1 != '/') && (A1 != '-'))) 
     {
       fprintf (stderr, "Incorrect format, re-enter date:\n");
       scanf("%i%c%i%c%i", &D1, &A1, &M1, &B1, &Y1);
       if (!(Y1 % 4)) x[2]=29;
     }

/*print first date*/

 fprintf (stderr, "First date = %i%c%i%c%i\n", D1 , A1 , M1 , B1 , Y1);

/*input second date*/

 fprintf (stderr , "Enter second date,in the form <day>/<month>/<year> or <day>-<month>-<year>.\nWhere <day>,<month> and <year> are integers:\n");
 (scanf("%i%c%i%c%i", &D2, &A2, &M2, &B2, &Y2));

/*check second date*/

 if (!(Y2 % 4)) y[2]=29;
 while ((Y2 < 1 || (Y2 > 9999)) || (M2 < 1 || M2 > 12) || (D2 < 1 || D2 > y[M2]) || (A2 != B2) || ((A2 != '/') && (A2 != '-'))) 
     {
       fprintf (stderr, "Incorrect format, re-enter date:\n");
       scanf("%i%c%i%c%i", &D2, &A2, &M2, &B2, &Y2);
       if (!(Y2 % 4)) y[2]=29;
     }

/*print second date*/

 fprintf (stderr, "Second date = %i%c%i%c%i\n", D2 , A2 , M2 , B2 , Y2);

/*convert first date into days*/

 for (F = 1; Y1 > F ; F++) 
    {
     if (F % 4 == 0) (Date1 = Date1 + 366);
     else (Date1 = Date1 + 365);
    }
 for (L = 1; M1 > L ; L++) 
     Date1 = Date1 + x[L];
 Date1 = Date1 + D1;

/*convert second date into days*/

 for (F = 1; Y2 > F ; F++) 
    {
     if (F % 4 == 0) (Date2 = Date2 + 366);
     else (Date2 = Date2 + 365);
    }
 for (L = 1; M2 > L ; L++) 
     Date2 = Date2 + y[L];
 Date2 = Date2 + D2;

/*standard output*/

 Dif = Date2 - Date1;
 printf("\n%i\n\n" , Dif);

/*text output*/

 if (Date2 > Date1)  
    {Dif = Date2 - Date1;
    fprintf (stderr , "Indicating that the first date is %i days before second date.\n" , Dif);}
 if (Date1 > Date2)  
    {Dif = Date1 - Date2;
    fprintf (stderr , "Indicating that the second date is %i days before first date.\n" , Dif);} 
 if (Date1 == Date2)  
    fprintf (stderr , "Indicating that the first date is equal to second date.\n"); 
}

When compiling using this: gcc -Wall -ansi date1.c -o date1 This occurs:

date1.c: In function ‘main’:
date1.c:70:1: warning: control reaches end of non-void function [-Wreturn-type]

Is there a simple fix for this or do I have to write my program to use functions propely? I am unable to change how I compile the code as it has to follow a set spec.

Apologies for the poor formatting of my question but this is my first time here and I was hoping to be able to do it alone.

Hope someone can help!

up vote 26 down vote accepted

You just need to return from the main function at some point. The error message says that the function is defined to return a value but you are not returning anything.

  /* .... */
  if (Date1 == Date2)  
     fprintf (stderr , "Indicating that the first date is equal to second date.\n"); 

  return 0;
}
  • 6
    Instead of 0 as a return value, one could also use EXIT_SUCCESS which is the success value that is foreseen by the C standard. – Jens Gustedt Mar 30 '14 at 10:04
  • @perreal you are an absolute star!!! – stuart194 Mar 30 '14 at 10:12
  • I'm returning a value and I still keep seeing this message, what should I do? – Dane411 Mar 2 '15 at 14:24
  • It is possible to still see this error if there are errors related to the return statement (e.g., the variable in the return statement does not have a known type or it is not defined). – perreal Mar 2 '15 at 14:31

You can also use EXIT_SUCCESS instead of return 0;. The macro EXIT_SUCCESS is actually defined as zero, but makes your program more readable.

  • 3
    Actually it's not a guaranteed that EXIT_SUCCESS is defined as zero. Please check C99 Standard 7.20/3 General utilities <stdlib.h> (p: 306) or C reference here: en.cppreference.com/w/c/program/EXIT_status Anyway, good point of bringing this macro in here. – Lazureus Jul 31 '15 at 15:38
  • 1
    @Lazureus True, but note that both of the references you mentioned state that while EXIT_SUCCESS may not be equal to zero, it is equivalent to zero when used as an exit code. – criptych May 4 '17 at 17:58

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