2

When I modify an ActiveRecord object during a session, I cannot seem to retrieve this modified instance in a method call. A simplified example follows:

Assume we have a model with only two objects: Project and Task linked with a 1-n relationship. Both objects can be active, but tasks require their parent project to be active before activating. There are two ways to activate: globally through the Project (which activates all tasks) or individually through a Task.

With the following straightforward implementation, an error occurs:

class Project < ActiveRecord::Base

  # Relations
  has_many :tasks

  def activate
    self.transaction do
      self.active = true
      tasks.each {|task| task.activate}
    end
  end

end

class Task < ActiveRecord::Base

  # Relations
  belongs_to :project

  def activate
    raise ArgumentError, "Cannot activate a task of an inactive project" unless project.active?
    self.active = true
  end

end

Indeed, the console will report

>> project = Project.first
=> #<Project id: 1, name: "Test project", active: false>
>> project.activate
ArgumentError: Cannot activate a task of an inactive project
    from /Rails/cache_issue/app/models/task.rb:7:in `activate'
    from /Rails/cache_issue/app/models/project.rb:9:in `activate'

The problem is that the Project object instance modified in the Project#activate method is not the same that ActiveRecord loads when accessing the Task#project relationship in the Task#activate method. When debugging, both objects are the "same" ActiveRecord record, but not the same Ruby object instance.

>> project = Project.first
=> #<Project id: 1, name: "Test project", active: false>
>> project.activate
"Project#activate:    self.id = 1,    self.object_id = 2176477060"
"   Task#activate: project.id = 1, project.object_id = 2176246440"
ArgumentError: Cannot activate a task of an inactive project
    from /Rails/cache_issue/app/models/task.rb:8:in `activate'
    from /Rails/cache_issue/app/models/project.rb:10:in `activate'

In other ORM systems, fetching a model instance by database identifier always looks in "cache", at least during a transaction and even during a session. I have tried to eager load the relations, but that does not change the issue since I could still be using another Project instance than the one ActiveRecord decided to link to the Task object.

Is there any technique (or gem or third-party) to get this simple process to work? That is that every reference to the same ActiveRecord record during a session/thread always refers to the same Ruby object instance?

Thanks,

-Jason

1

Here are a couple of things you can try.

  1. redefining Project#activate so that it saves the Project before any of the tasks are activated.

    class Project < ActiveRecord::Base    
      # Relations
      has_many :tasks
    
      def activate
        self.transaction do
          save!
          self.active = true
          tasks.each {|task| task.activate}
        end
      end    
    end
    

    Essentially project is being loaded from that database by each as it check the activated status of the associated project. Saving the project first should fix that.

  2. Use autosave and set the tasks active status directly.

    class Project < ActiveRecord::Base    
      # Relations
      has_many :tasks, :autosave => true
    
      def activate
        self.transaction do           
          self.active = true
          tasks.each {|task| task.active = true}
        end
      end    
    end
    

    N.B. Requires Rails 2.3. Also, the tasks of a project will not be activated until the project is saved.

  3. Have Task#activate accept a boolean argument indicating whether or not to check if the associated project is activated. Essentially mirroring ActiveRecord::Base#save.

    class Task < ActiveRecord::Base    
      # Relations
      belongs_to :project
    
      def activate(validate_active_project = true)
        if validate_active_project && ! project.active?
          raise ArgumentError, "Cannot activate a task of an inactive project" 
        end
        self.active = true
      end
    
    end
    
    class Project < ActiveRecord::Base    
      # Relations
      has_many :tasks
    
      def activate
        self.transaction do           
          self.active = true
          tasks.each {|task| task.activate(false)}
        end
      end    
    end
    
  • Hi, thanks for your quick response. 1. The goal of the transaction is to activate the project and call the activation method on the tasks in the same transaction. It seems that hard-saving the project to the database first defeats this purpose. Although, that certainly would work! 2. I like this work-around, but it does not fit the actual business case. I simplified here, but the Task#activate method does more than just setting the active flag. I specifically do not want to recode the Task#activate logic inline in the Project#activate method - that would break the OO encapsulation logic. – Jason Sweeney Feb 16 '10 at 21:19
  • I agree with you on both points. So I've added a third potential solution, modelled after ActiveRecord::Base#save. – EmFi Feb 16 '10 at 22:14
  • I like this third solution and it seems my only reasonable choice. Since - as seems to be confirmed by the answer by Tadman - ActiveRecord simply does not adhere to the principe of keeping a single Ruby object instance for a logical ActiveRecord record. – Jason Sweeney Feb 17 '10 at 1:51
0

The back-reference to the "belongs_to" relationship actually instantiates a new Project as you're seeing there. DataMapper adheres to the philosophy of "One Record, One Instance" quite strictly, but ActiveRecord is really nowhere near this.

When it comes to doing something as simple as twiddling bits, you might find this is more effective since it doesn't introduce a dependent model load:

class Project < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :tasks

  def activate!
    self.transaction do
      self.active = true
      tasks.update_all(:active => true)
      self.save
    end
  end
end

You can implement the bit-twiddling as an after_save method to simplify this somewhat to automatically disable tasks that are in inactive projects:

after_save :deactivate_tasks

def deactivate_tasks
  if (!self.active)
    tasks.update_all(:active => false)
  end
end
  • Thanks for that, and for confirming what we feared in our dev team about the lack of what you could call a 2nd level cache. My example was contrived to simplify the situation, but in our real code, Task#activate is a more complex business method that cannot extracted as you proposed. But your alternatives certainly do address the presented situation. – Jason Sweeney Feb 17 '10 at 1:54

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