-2

This question already has an answer here:

Why does this not toggle correctly?

$('#violation_form label').click(function() {
    //alert($(this).parent().prev().html());
    var $checkbox = $(this).closest('li').find('input[type="checkbox"]');
    console.log(!$checkbox.attr('checked'));
    $checkbox.attr('checked', !$checkbox.attr('checked'));
});

http://jsfiddle.net/SEkTp/2/

marked as duplicate by VDP, raina77ow, Code Lღver, SchmitzIT, Tim B Mar 31 '14 at 9:41

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  • 1
    there is no li in the html - also use .prop() instead of .attr() – Arun P Johny Mar 31 '14 at 7:32
  • see jsfiddle.net/arunpjohny/BE9z3/1 – Arun P Johny Mar 31 '14 at 7:33
  • 1
    There's no LI, jQuery is not defined, prop is better than attr here... Really, why hurry with posting a question THAT much? – raina77ow Mar 31 '14 at 7:33
  • My Good sir I beg you to look at the link again. I have corrected the previous deformities – George Newton Mar 31 '14 at 7:33
  • @GeorgeNewton because you need to use .prop() insread of .attr() - see the fiddle I posted above – Arun P Johny Mar 31 '14 at 7:34
2

You're misusing <label> element. There's no point doing magic tricks to make clicking it affect the corresponding <input> when you can do it directly. Quoting the docs (MDN):

The HTML <label> Element represents a caption for an item in a user interface. It can be associated with a control either by placing the control element inside the label element, or by using the for attribute. Such a control is called the labeled control of the label element.

So both...

<label><input type="checkbox" />Whatever</label>

... and, more complex, but more flexible:

<input type="checkbox" name="some_checkbox" id="some_checkbox" />
<label for="some_checkbox">Whatever it is</label>

... will work.

Demo.

  • omg yes dis is so much simplerah! – George Newton Mar 31 '14 at 7:39
  • Didn't realise you could wrap the label around the element and forego the use of for, does it reliably work like that? No docs I've looked at have mentioned doing it that way. – MLeFevre Mar 31 '14 at 7:45
  • 1
    @MLeFevre Why, I considered that to be a well-known feature. Just added the quote from MDN, though. ) – raina77ow Mar 31 '14 at 7:56
1

There is no li element in the DOM. Also use prop to set checkboxes on/off. Try this:

    $('#violation_form label').click(function() {
    $checkbox = $(this).closest('form').find('input[type="checkbox"]');
    console.log(!$checkbox.attr('checked'));
    $checkbox.prop("checked", !$checkbox.prop("checked"));
});

Working Demo

1

You can use .prop() instead of .attr() to set the checked state of your checkbox:

$checkbox.prop('checked', !$checkbox.prop('checked'));

Final code look like:

$('#violation_form label').click(function () {
    //alert($(this).parent().prev().html());
    var $checkbox = $(this).closest('li').find('input[type="checkbox"]');
    console.log(!$checkbox.prop('checked'));
    $checkbox.prop('checked', !$checkbox.prop('checked'));
});

Updated Fiddle

1

Maybe you want this => http://jsfiddle.net/SEkTp/14/

jQuery('#violation_form label').click(function() {
   // alert("hi");
    //alert($(this).parent().prev().html());
    var checkbox = jQuery(this).find('input[type="checkbox"]');
    console.log(!checkbox.attr('checked'));
    checkbox.attr('checked', !checkbox.attr('checked'));
});
1

Check this one, You missed <li> in that structure. Now it's working fine

Demo

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