1

I want to end a thread WorkerThread after a certain amount of time has elapsed. I was thinking to use a second thread TimeoutThread for this, that changes a flag after 15 seconds so the other thread stops. Is there a more elegant way in boost to do this?

#include <boost/thread.hpp>

struct MyClass
{
    boost::thread timeoutThread;
    boost::thread workerThread;
    bool btimeout = true;

    void run()
    {
     timeoutThread = boost::thread(boost::bind(&MyClass::TimeoutThread, this));
      workerThread  = boost::thread(boost::bind(&MyClass::WorkerThread, this));
     workerThread.join();
     TimeoutThread.join();
    }


    void WorkerThread() {

        while(boost::this_thread::interruption_requested() == false && btimeout) 
        {
            printf(".");

        }
    }

    void TimeoutThread() 
    {
        boost::this_thread::disable_interruption oDisableInterruption;
        DWORD nStartTime = GetTickCount();

        while(boost::this_thread::interruption_requested() == false) 
        {
            if(GetTickCount() - nStartTime > 15)
            {
                m_bTimeout = false;
                break;
            }
        }

    }
};

int main()
{
    MyClass x;
    x.run();
}
3
  • 1
    Why did you "mutilate" the code so that it can't compile? It's so close to being selfcontained, but then you removed the class, mistyped MyClass bTimeout, bound extraneous this pointers that don't exist etc. In that case, better to keep the class, because I just had to recreate it in order to compile...
    – sehe
    Mar 31, 2014 at 13:54
  • Also, it seems you removed the join() on the timeout thread just now, please be aware that this is now invalid; all threads must be joined or detached before application termination
    – sehe
    Mar 31, 2014 at 13:56
  • lol at the edit :/ It still says MyClass btimeout; and you're still binding this in main... Never mind. See my answer for SSCCE by now (and the comment)
    – sehe
    Mar 31, 2014 at 14:30

2 Answers 2

1

You could use a sleep:

#include <boost/thread.hpp>

struct MyClass
{
    boost::thread timeoutThread;
    boost::thread workerThread;

    void TimeoutThread() {
        boost::this_thread::sleep_for(boost::chrono::milliseconds(15));
        workerThread.interrupt();
    }

    void WorkerThread() {
        while(!boost::this_thread::interruption_requested())
        {
            //Do stuff
        }
    }

    void run()
    {
        timeoutThread = boost::thread(boost::bind(&MyClass::TimeoutThread, this));
        workerThread  = boost::thread(boost::bind(&MyClass::WorkerThread, this));
        workerThread.join();
        timeoutThread.join();
    }
};

int main()
{
    MyClass x;
    x.run();
}

This has the minimal benefit of being portable.

See it live on Coliru

Please be aware of the deadline_timer class in Boost Asio too.

And it looks like you're trying to await a condition in your worker thread. If so, you can also await a condition_variable with a deadline (cv.wait_until or with a timeout: cv.wait_for).

4
  • Thanks! That would probably work, but I am using boost 1.49.0 and this only seems to work in the trunk version I suppose.
    – tzippy
    Mar 31, 2014 at 13:57
  • I use 1_55 but AFAIR it's been in earlier versions
    – sehe
    Mar 31, 2014 at 14:12
  • @tzippy Also, here's the equivalent std c++11: std=c++11 only and the equivalent in boost only. This shouldn't require anything "new" or "fancy".
    – sehe
    Mar 31, 2014 at 14:29
  • @tzippy did you get my comment ^ ?
    – sehe
    Mar 31, 2014 at 15:50
0

Just check time in worker thread and you won't need a separate timeout thread:

void WorkerThread() 
{
    DWORD nStartTime = GetTickCount();
    while(boost::this_thread::interruption_requested() == false && GetTickCount() - nStartTime < 15000) 
    {
        printf(".");

    }
}

BTW, please note 15000, because GetTickCount() units are milliseconds

3
  • Why would we assume that he didn't want milliseconds?
    – sehe
    Mar 31, 2014 at 15:50
  • 1
    @sehe: "that changes a flag after 15 seconds", of course this could be a mistake too :) Mar 31, 2014 at 15:53
  • Ahaha. I missed that :)
    – sehe
    Mar 31, 2014 at 16:10

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