404

Is there a simple, one-line way to get the data of a form as it would be if it was to be submitted in the classic HTML-only way?

For example:

<form>
    <input type="radio" name="foo" value="1" checked="checked" />
    <input type="radio" name="foo" value="0" />
    <input name="bar" value="xxx" />
    <select name="this">
        <option value="hi" selected="selected">Hi</option>
        <option value="ho">Ho</option>
</form>

Output:

{
    "foo": "1",
    "bar": "xxx",
    "this": "hi"
}

Something like this is too simple, since it does not (correctly) include textareas, selects, radio buttons and checkboxes:

$("#form input").each(function () {
    data[theFieldName] = theFieldValue;
});

29 Answers 29

429
$('form').serialize() //this produces: "foo=1&bar=xxx&this=hi"

demo

| improve this answer | |
  • 15
    Close, but perhaps something that returns an array with key-value pairs instead of a single string? – Bart van Heukelom Feb 16 '10 at 21:28
  • 80
    Nvm, found it in the comments for the serialize() function. It's called serializeArray. It returns an array of arrays (which contain an entry "name" and "value") but that should be easy enough to transform. – Bart van Heukelom Feb 16 '10 at 21:33
  • 22
    And using underscore library can be transformed using: _.object($("#myform").serializeArray().map(function(v) {return [v.name, v.value];} )) – MhdSyrwan Jul 29 '14 at 1:25
  • 8
    @BartvanHeukelom I know this is 4 years later, but .serializeArray() will return an array. – TJ WealthEngine API Evangelist Oct 30 '14 at 15:30
  • 6
    Make sure that every input tag includes name attribute, otherwise it won't return anything. – Eugene Kulabuhov Jan 23 '15 at 14:32
504

Use $('form').serializeArray(), which returns an array:

[
  {"name":"foo","value":"1"},
  {"name":"bar","value":"xxx"},
  {"name":"this","value":"hi"}
]

Other option is $('form').serialize(), which returns a string:

"foo=1&bar=xxx&this=hi"

Take a look at this jsfiddle demo

| improve this answer | |
  • 91
    serializeArray would be so much more useful if it returned an object with key-value pairs – GetFree Oct 2 '13 at 19:44
  • 8
    I agree that an object would be ideal. However, there is a problem - a key is allowed to have multiple values. Would you return a key-"array of values" object, or key-"first value" or something else? I think jQuery guys chose none of the above :) – Paul Oct 9 '13 at 6:25
  • Be aware of a problem with multiple values (as @Paul mentioned above), checkboxes and multiple inputs with name="multiple[]" do not work. The solution for POST method is the same, just use $('form').serialize(). Also the POST method does not have limit of 2000 characters as GET does in most browsers, so can be used even for a pretty large data. – Artru Sep 17 '16 at 8:51
  • Please also beware that in order to record a value from any form input, the input must have a name attribute. – Chris - Jr Oct 27 '17 at 19:37
  • @GetFree why not just use the jQuery map function? function getFormData(form) { var rawJson = form.serializeArray(); var model = {}; $.map(rawJson, function (n, i) { model[n['name']] = n['value']; }); return model; } – Tom McDonough Oct 12 '18 at 15:23
195

Updated answer for 2014: HTML5 FormData does this

var formData = new FormData(document.querySelector('form'))

You can then post formData exactly as it is - it contains all names and values used in the form.

| improve this answer | |
  • 13
    Plus one as FormData is good and useful, but worth noting that if you want to READ the data inside FormData it's not quite so easy (see stackoverflow.com/questions/7752188/…) – StackExchange What The Heck Dec 29 '14 at 16:28
  • 1
    Keep in mind FormData is part of the XMLHttpRequest advanced features (previously known as XMLHttpRequest Level 2) so you must rely on a polyfill for Internet Explorer < 10. caniuse.com/#feat=xhr2 – Pier-Luc Gendreau Jun 15 '15 at 23:18
  • 3
    @yochannah, not so. Sure, one can't simply access and edit the data like a normal object, but it is still trivial to get the data. Check out the entries() method [MDN page]. – Web and Flow Sep 17 '16 at 16:36
  • @Web and Flow thanks for pointing this out! I love it when browsers add new and useful features :) times, they are a-changing. – StackExchange What The Heck Sep 18 '16 at 7:55
  • I'm trying to use FormData to send an object to my Flask-python script, but it doesn't seem to be coming over as a normal request object that I can unpack. Can someone point to an explanation of any special steps to handle it on the server side? That's where it seems empty to me. – manisha Nov 15 '16 at 20:41
179

Based on jQuery.serializeArray, returns key-value pairs.

var data = $('#form').serializeArray().reduce(function(obj, item) {
    obj[item.name] = item.value;
    return obj;
}, {});
| improve this answer | |
  • 11
    Key-value pairs here, guys, everybody, come here! It is golden!!! Thanks! If I want a value of an element named "retailer", I do this console.log($('#form').serializeArray().reduce(function(obj, item) { obj[item.name] = item.value; return obj;}, {} )['retailer']); – Yevgeniy Afanasyev Nov 9 '15 at 2:44
  • I created yesterday a JQuery method based on this answer but working with multiselects and input arrays (with name 'example[]'). You can find it in my answer below. Anyway, good approach neuront, thanks! :) – manuman94 Apr 3 '19 at 8:05
  • This one suited me the most, out of all the answers! – VPetrovic May 15 '19 at 19:02
  • This IMHO is the best answer! – Rahul Apr 26 at 19:18
73
document.querySelector('form').addEventListener('submit', (e) => {
  const formData = new FormData(e.target);
  // Now you can use formData.get('foo'), for example.
  // Don't forget e.preventDefault() if you want to stop normal form .submission
});

This is a nitpicky answer, but let me explain why this is a better solution:

  • We're properly handling a form submit rather than a button press. Some people like to push enter on fields. Some people use alternative input devices such as speech input or other accessibility devices. Handle the form submit and you correctly solve it for everyone.

  • We're digging into the form data for the actual form that was submitted. If you change your form selector later, you don't have to change the selectors for all the fields. Furthermore, you might have several forms with the same input names. No need to disambiguate with excessive IDs and what not, just track the inputs based on the form that was submitted. This also enables you to use a single event handler for multiple forms if that is appropriate for your situation.

  • The FormData interface is fairly new, but is well supported by browsers. It's a great way to build that data collection to get the real values of what's in the form. Without it, you're going to have to loop through all the elements (such as with form.elements) and figure out what's checked, what isn't, what the values are, etc. Totally possible if you need old browser support, but the FormData interface is simpler.

  • I'm using ES6 here... not a requirement by any means, so change it back to be ES5 compatible if you need old browser support.

| improve this answer | |
  • fyi, FormData objects dont expose their values. To get a plain object from it, see stackoverflow.com/questions/41431322/… – phil294 Nov 24 '18 at 10:45
  • 2
    @Blauhirn Nonsense, of course they expose the values. The code in my answer works. You should try it. Here, I made a fiddle for you: jsfiddle.net/zv9s1xq5 If you want an iterator, use formData.entries(). – Brad Nov 24 '18 at 13:14
  • I know it works, but the properties are not accessible by key. For example, formData.foo is undefined. As seen in your answer, .get() needs to be called for that which I think is inconvenient. Maybe "does not expose" came accross the wrong way. So, to generate something like { foo: 'bar' } from a submit event, you need to iterate over them manually. Hence the . To get a plain object from it, see [link]. – phil294 Nov 24 '18 at 13:56
  • 1
    @Blauhirn You're wrong about that. XMLHttpRequest supports FormData directly. xhr.send(formData); – Brad Nov 24 '18 at 16:04
  • 1
    @Blauhirn JSON.stringify([...formData]) Or, if you want your keys/values separate... [...formData].reduce((prev, cur) => { prev[cur[0]] = cur[1]; return prev;}, {}) – Brad Nov 24 '18 at 17:22
25

use .serializeArray() to get the data in array format and then convert it into an object:

function getFormObj(formId) {
    var formObj = {};
    var inputs = $('#'+formId).serializeArray();
    $.each(inputs, function (i, input) {
        formObj[input.name] = input.value;
    });
    return formObj;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • This overwrites my checkboxes if I have something like <input type="checkbox" name="someList" value="one" /> <input type="checkbox" name="someList" value="two" />. If both are checked, the object only contains the second checkbox value. – dmathisen Jan 11 '15 at 22:43
  • 2
    Isn't this a case where someList should be type="radio"? – dylanjameswagner Jan 14 '15 at 16:46
  • upvote because the accepted answer doesn't return an object with the keys as: name:value – Matt-the-Marxist May 6 '19 at 1:09
24

Here's a really simple and short soluton that even doesn't require Jquery.

var formElements=document.getElementById("myForm").elements;    
var postData={};
for (var i=0; i<formElements.length; i++)
    if (formElements[i].type!="submit")//we dont want to include the submit-buttom
        postData[formElements[i].name]=formElements[i].value;
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    This doesn't work with radio buttons: the last option is always the one stored to postData. – Kyle Falconer Feb 17 '16 at 19:49
  • 3
    Thank you for giving us a non jquery answer. – Glen Pierce Jul 15 '17 at 20:35
23

It is 2019 and there's a better way to do this:

const form = document.querySelector('form');
const data = new URLSearchParams(new FormData(form).entries());

or if you want a plain Object instead

const form = document.querySelector('form');
const data = Object.fromEntries(new FormData(form).entries());

although note that this won't work with duplicate keys like you get from multi-select and duplicate checkboxes with the same name.

| improve this answer | |
  • Totally. Though, I didn't get an array for a list of inputs that all have the same name which meant I had to use document.getElementsByClassName and a for loop but hey, still nicer than requiring jQuery etc – alphanumeric0101 Jul 8 '19 at 20:05
  • 1
    This answer is my favourite. But it should read document.querySelector instead of just querySelector. – adabru Jul 10 '19 at 8:45
  • Note "FormData will only use input fields that use the name attribute" - from MDN – binaryfunt Mar 8 at 18:13
16
$('#myform').serialize();
| improve this answer | |
13

I use this:

jQuery Plugin

(function($){
  $.fn.getFormData = function(){
    var data = {};
    var dataArray = $(this).serializeArray();
    for(var i=0;i<dataArray.length;i++){
      data[dataArray[i].name] = dataArray[i].value;
    }
    return data;
  }
})(jQuery);

HTML Form

<form id='myform'>
  <input name='myVar1' />
  <input name='myVar2' />
</form>

Get the Data

var myData = $("#myForm").getFormData();
| improve this answer | |
  • Note that this plugin doesn't work for cases where multiple form input entries with the same name are present. The last entry would replace the previous one whereas the expected behavior would be to get all the values as an Array – Milli Jun 8 '17 at 18:45
  • 1
    Just a note that a year later I now think this is a terrible answer and no one should use it. As the previous comment says, things like radio buttons would not work. There are better answers above, use one of those instead. – Dustin Poissant Sep 26 '17 at 14:09
12
$("#form input, #form select, #form textarea").each(function() {
 data[theFieldName] = theFieldValue;
});

other than that, you might want to look at serialize();

| improve this answer | |
11

Here is a working JavaScript only implementation which correctly handles checkboxes, radio buttons, and sliders (probably other input types as well, but I've only tested these).

function setOrPush(target, val) {
    var result = val;
    if (target) {
        result = [target];
        result.push(val);
    }
    return result;
}

function getFormResults(formElement) {
    var formElements = formElement.elements;
    var formParams = {};
    var i = 0;
    var elem = null;
    for (i = 0; i < formElements.length; i += 1) {
        elem = formElements[i];
        switch (elem.type) {
            case 'submit':
                break;
            case 'radio':
                if (elem.checked) {
                    formParams[elem.name] = elem.value;
                }
                break;
            case 'checkbox':
                if (elem.checked) {
                    formParams[elem.name] = setOrPush(formParams[elem.name], elem.value);
                }
                break;
            default:
                formParams[elem.name] = setOrPush(formParams[elem.name], elem.value);
        }
    }
    return formParams;
}

Working example:

    function setOrPush(target, val) {
      var result = val;
      if (target) {
        result = [target];
        result.push(val);
      }
      return result;
    }

    function getFormResults(formElement) {
      var formElements = formElement.elements;
      var formParams = {};
      var i = 0;
      var elem = null;
      for (i = 0; i < formElements.length; i += 1) {
        elem = formElements[i];
        switch (elem.type) {
          case 'submit':
            break;
          case 'radio':
            if (elem.checked) {
              formParams[elem.name] = elem.value;
            }
            break;
          case 'checkbox':
            if (elem.checked) {
              formParams[elem.name] = setOrPush(formParams[elem.name], elem.value);
            }
            break;
          default:
            formParams[elem.name] = setOrPush(formParams[elem.name], elem.value);
        }
      }
      return formParams;
    }

    //
    // Boilerplate for running the snippet/form
    //

    function ok() {
      var params = getFormResults(document.getElementById('main_form'));
      document.getElementById('results_wrapper').innerHTML = JSON.stringify(params, null, ' ');
    }

    (function() {
      var main_form = document.getElementById('main_form');
      main_form.addEventListener('submit', function(event) {
        event.preventDefault();
        ok();
      }, false);
    })();
<form id="main_form">
  <div id="questions_wrapper">
    <p>what is a?</p>
    <div>
      <input type="radio" required="" name="q_0" value="a" id="a_0">
      <label for="a_0">a</label>
      <input type="radio" required="" name="q_0" value="b" id="a_1">
      <label for="a_1">b</label>
      <input type="radio" required="" name="q_0" value="c" id="a_2">
      <label for="a_2">c</label>
      <input type="radio" required="" name="q_0" value="d" id="a_3">
      <label for="a_3">d</label>
    </div>
    <div class="question range">
      <label for="a_13">A?</label>
      <input type="range" required="" name="q_3" id="a_13" min="0" max="10" step="1" list="q_3_dl">
      <datalist id="q_3_dl">
        <option value="0"></option>
        <option value="1"></option>
        <option value="2"></option>
        <option value="3"></option>
        <option value="4"></option>
        <option value="5"></option>
        <option value="6"></option>
        <option value="7"></option>
        <option value="8"></option>
        <option value="9"></option>
        <option value="10"></option>
      </datalist>
    </div>
    <p>A and/or B?</p>
    <div>
      <input type="checkbox" name="q_4" value="A" id="a_14">
      <label for="a_14">A</label>
      <input type="checkbox" name="q_4" value="B" id="a_15">
      <label for="a_15">B</label>
    </div>
  </div>
  <button id="btn" type="submit">OK</button>
</form>
<div id="results_wrapper"></div>

edit:

If you're looking for a more complete implementation, then take a look at this section of the project I made this for. I'll update this question eventually with the complete solution I came up with, but maybe this will be helpful to someone.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Nice solution :) I did find one bug though, with the setOrPush function. It does not include a check to see whether target is already an array, causing the creation of a deep nested array in case of multiple checked checkboxes with the same name. – Wouter van Dam May 30 '17 at 22:19
  • @KyleFalconer Nice! Why didn't you merge the switch cases for radio and checkbox -- they will work correctly (I am guess). – Ethan Jun 30 '17 at 23:41
  • @Ethan It's because a checkbox can have multiple values selected and a radio can only ever have one value selected, so the way I store the value changes. – Kyle Falconer Jul 3 '17 at 16:59
  • @KyleFalconer Yes, I understand that. The code for handling 'checkbox' also takes care of the single possible choice for 'radio', by virtue of the 'SetOrPush' routine. – Ethan Jul 6 '17 at 0:22
  • @Ethan Oh I think I know what you're saying. It could be done either way, but I think I did it this way just because I wanted just one value, not an array of values. – Kyle Falconer Jul 7 '17 at 18:46
9

If you are using jQuery, here is a little function that will do what you are looking for.

First, add an ID to your form (unless it is the only form on the page, then you can just use 'form' as the dom query)

<form id="some-form">
 <input type="radio" name="foo" value="1" checked="checked" />
 <input type="radio" name="foo" value="0" />
 <input name="bar" value="xxx" />
 <select name="this">
  <option value="hi" selected="selected">Hi</option>
  <option value="ho">Ho</option>
</form>

<script>
//read in a form's data and convert it to a key:value object
function getFormData(dom_query){
    var out = {};
    var s_data = $(dom_query).serializeArray();
    //transform into simple data/value object
    for(var i = 0; i<s_data.length; i++){
        var record = s_data[i];
        out[record.name] = record.value;
    }
    return out;
}

console.log(getFormData('#some-form'));
</script>

The output would look like:

{
 "foo": "1",
 "bar": "xxx",
 "this": "hi"
}
| improve this answer | |
7

You can also use the FormData Objects; The FormData object lets you compile a set of key/value pairs to send using XMLHttpRequest. Its primarily intended for use in sending form data, but can be used independently from forms in order to transmit keyed data.

        var formElement = document.getElementById("myform_id");
        var formData = new FormData(formElement);
        console.log(formData);
| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks, but what if you don't have ID? What if you have a form as JQuery object? var form = $(this).closest('form'); ? Should var formElement = document.getElementById(form[0]); work instead your firs line? Well it is not working, unfortunately. Do you know why? – Yevgeniy Afanasyev Nov 9 '15 at 1:55
  • Actually the FormData is not supported by all browsers :( so better use a different approach – numediaweb Nov 9 '15 at 9:41
  • Thanks. I used latest chrome and still it was not working. So I went with #neuront answer from uphere. – Yevgeniy Afanasyev Nov 9 '15 at 22:45
6

This will append all form fields to the JavaScript object "res":

var res = {};
$("#form input, #form select, #form textarea").each(function(i, obj) {
    res[obj.name] = $(obj).val();
})
| improve this answer | |
  • Probably because this exact same answer was already posted in 2010. – nathanvda Mar 26 '15 at 12:43
  • I didn't know that. For such a short answer this is not surprising. And even so, where is the reference? – gamliela Mar 26 '15 at 13:23
  • Seriously? You do not believe my comment without the reference and you can't even look over the list of answer to see if they are the same? stackoverflow.com/a/2276469/216513 – nathanvda Mar 26 '15 at 13:42
  • I thought that you mean an answer in another question. I don't remember now the details and my reasons; maybe because it's not exactly the same – gamliela Mar 26 '15 at 18:43
  • 1
    Perfect answer for someone who want it to be working for input, select multiple and textarea. Because, using serialize you won't get all the items that are selected in the select tag. But, using .val() you'll get exactly what you want as an array. Simple, straight forward answer. – Sailesh Kotha Nov 15 '17 at 3:10
6

I have included the answer to also give back the object required.

function getFormData(form) {
var rawJson = form.serializeArray();
var model = {};

$.map(rawJson, function (n, i) {
    model[n['name']] = n['value'];
});

return model;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • This won't handle arrays at all; foo[bar][] = 'qux' should serialize to { foo: { bar: [ 'qux' ] } }. – amphetamachine Oct 31 '19 at 17:34
6

Based on neuront's response I created a simple JQuery method that gets the form data in key-value pairs but it works for multi-selects and for array inputs with name='example[]'.

This is how it is used:

var form_data = $("#form").getFormObject();

You can find an example below of its definition and how it works.

// Function start
$.fn.getFormObject = function() {
    var object = $(this).serializeArray().reduce(function(obj, item) {
        var name = item.name.replace("[]", "");
        if ( typeof obj[name] !== "undefined" ) {
            if ( !Array.isArray(obj[name]) ) {
                obj[name] = [ obj[name], item.value ];
            } else {
               obj[name].push(item.value);
            }
        } else {
            obj[name] = item.value;
        }
        return obj;
    }, {});
    return object;
}
// Function ends

// This is how it's used
$("#getObject").click( function() {
  var form_data = $("#form").getFormObject();
  console.log(form_data);
});
/* Only to make view better ;) */
#getObject {
  padding: 10px;
  cursor:pointer;
  background:#0098EE;
  color:white;
  display:inline-block;
}
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.3/jquery.min.js"></script>
<form id="form">
  <input type="text" name="text" value="Hola amigo" /> 
  
  <input type="text" name="text_array[]" value="Array 1" /> 
  <input type="text" name="text_array[]" value="Array 2" /> 
  <input type="text" name="text_array[]" value="Array 3" /> 
  
  <select name="multiselect" multiple>
    <option name="option1" selected> option 1 </option>
    <option name="option2" selected> option 2 </option>
  </select>
  
  <input type="checkbox" name="checkbox" value="checkbox1" checked/>
  <input type="checkbox" name="checkbox" value="checkbox2" checked/>
  
  <input type="radio" name="radio" value="radio1" checked/>
  <input type="radio" name="radio" value="radio2"/>

</form>

<div id="getObject"> Get object (check the console!) </div>

| improve this answer | |
5
var formData = new FormData($('#form-id'));
params   = $('#form-id').serializeArray();

$.each(params, function(i, val) {
    formData.append(val.name, val.value);
});
| improve this answer | |
4
function getFormData($form){
    var unindexed_array = $form.serializeArray();
    var indexed_array = {};

    $.map(unindexed_array, function(n, i){
        if(indexed_array[n['name']] == undefined){
            indexed_array[n['name']] = [n['value']];
        }else{
            indexed_array[n['name']].push(n['value']);
        }
    });

    return indexed_array;
}
| improve this answer | |
4

you can use this function for have an object or a JSON from form.

for use it:

var object = formService.getObjectFormFields("#idform");

 function  getObjectFormFields(formSelector)
        {
            /// <summary>Função que retorna objeto com base nas propriedades name dos elementos do formulário.</summary>
            /// <param name="formSelector" type="String">Seletor do formulário</param>

            var form = $(formSelector);

            var result = {};
            var arrayAuxiliar = [];
            form.find(":input:text").each(function (index, element)
            {
                var name = $(element).attr('name');

                var value = $(element).val();
                result[name] = value;
            });

            form.find(":input[type=hidden]").each(function (index, element)
            {
                var name = $(element).attr('name');
                var value = $(element).val();
                result[name] = value;
            });


            form.find(":input:checked").each(function (index, element)
            {
                var name;
                var value;
                if ($(this).attr("type") == "radio")
                {
                    name = $(element).attr('name');
                    value = $(element).val();
                    result[name] = value;
                }
                else if ($(this).attr("type") == "checkbox")
                {
                    name = $(element).attr('name');
                    value = $(element).val();
                    if (result[name])
                    {
                        if (Array.isArray(result[name]))
                        {
                            result[name].push(value);
                        } else
                        {
                            var aux = result[name];
                            result[name] = [];
                            result[name].push(aux);
                            result[name].push(value);
                        }

                    } else
                    {
                        result[name] = [];
                        result[name].push(value);
                    }
                }

            });

            form.find("select option:selected").each(function (index, element)
            {
                var name = $(element).parent().attr('name');
                var value = $(element).val();
                result[name] = value;

            });

            arrayAuxiliar = [];
            form.find("checkbox:checked").each(function (index, element)
            {
                var name = $(element).attr('name');
                var value = $(element).val();
                result[name] = arrayAuxiliar.push(value);
            });

            form.find("textarea").each(function (index, element)
            {
                var name = $(element).attr('name');
                var value = $(element).val();
                result[name] = value;
            });

            return result;
        }

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. - From Review – Wahyu Kristianto Jul 7 '16 at 14:55
  • But this link has a function for help his (I think). But I am going to put the code next time. – Marcos Costa Jul 7 '16 at 16:54
3

I wrote a library to solve this very problem: JSONForms. It takes a form, goes through each input and builds a JSON object you can easily read.

Say you have the following form:

<form enctype='application/json'>
  <input name='places[0][city]' value='New York City'>
  <input type='number' name='places[0][population]' value='8175133'>
  <input name='places[1][city]' value='Los Angeles'>
  <input type='number' name='places[1][population]' value='3792621'>
  <input name='places[2][city]' value='Chicago'>
  <input type='number' name='places[2][population]' value='2695598'>
</form>

Passing the form to JSONForms' encode method returns you the following object:

{
  "places": [
    {
      "city": "New York City",
      "population": 8175133
    },
    {
      "city": "Los Angeles",
      "population": 3792621
    },
    {
      "city": "Chicago",
      "population": 2695598
    }
  ]
}

Here's demo with your form.

| improve this answer | |
  • Looks and works nicely, thanks. Just one thing, the minified version calls a map file, should be optional imo. – adi518 Jan 28 '17 at 22:51
2

$( "form" ).bind( "submit", function(e) {
    e.preventDefault();
    
    console.log(  $(this).serializeObject() );    

    //console.log(  $(this).serialize() );
    //console.log(  $(this).serializeArray() );

});


$.fn.serializeObject = function() {
    var o = {};
    var a = this.serializeArray();

    $.each( a, function() {
        if ( o[this.name] !== undefined) 
        {
            if ( ! o[this.name].push ) 
            {
                o[this.name] = [o[this.name]];
            }
            o[this.name].push(this.value || '');
        }
        else 
        {
            o[this.name] = this.value || '';
        }
    });

    return o;
};
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/3.4.1/jquery.min.js"></script>

<form>

    <input type="radio" name="foo" value="1" checked="checked" />
    <input type="radio" name="foo" value="0" />
    <input name="bar" value="xxx" />

    <select name="this">
        <option value="hi" selected="selected">Hi</option>
        <option value="ho">Ho</option>
    </select>

    <input type="submit" value="Submit" />

</form>

Codepen

| improve this answer | |
2

For those of you who would prefer an Object as opposed to a serialized string (like the one returned by $(form).serialize(), and a slight improvement on $(form).serializeArray()), feel free to use the code below:

var Form = {
    _form: null,
    _validate: function(){
        if(!this._form || this._form.tagName.toLowerCase() !== "form") return false;
        if(!this._form.elements.length) return false;
    }, _loopFields: function(callback){
        var elements = this._form.elements;
        for(var i = 0; i < elements.length; i++){
            var element = form.elements[i];
            if(name !== ""){
                callback(this._valueOfField(element));
            }
        }
    }, _valueOfField: function(element){
        var type = element.type;
        var name = element.name.trim();
        var nodeName = element.nodeName.toLowerCase();
        switch(nodeName){
            case "input":
                if(type === "radio" || type === "checkbox"){
                    if(element.checked){
                        return element.value;
                    }
                }
                return element.value;
                break;
            case "select":
                if(type === "select-multiple"){
                    for(var i = 0; i < element.options.length; i++){
                        if(options[i].selected){
                            return element.value;
                        }
                    }
                }
                return element.value;
                break;
            case "button":
                switch(type){
                    case "reset": 
                    case "submit": 
                    case "button":
                        return element.value;
                        break;
                }
                break;
        } 
    }, serialize: function(form){
        var data = {};
        this._form = form;

        if(this._validate()){
            this._loopFields(function(value){
                if(value !== null) data[name] = value;
            });
        }
        return data;
    }
};

To execute it, just use Form.serialize(form) and the function will return an Object similar to this:

<!-- { username: "username", password: "password" } !-->
<input type="text" value="username">
<input type="password" value="password">

As a bonus, it means you don't have to install the entire bundle of jQuery just for one serialize function.

| improve this answer | |
1

I wrote a function that takes care of multiple checkboxes and multiple selects. In those cases it returns an array.

function getFormData(formId) {
    return $('#' + formId).serializeArray().reduce(function (obj, item) {
        var name = item.name,
            value = item.value;

        if (obj.hasOwnProperty(name)) {
            if (typeof obj[name] == "string") {
                obj[name] = [obj[name]];
                obj[name].push(value);
            } else {
                obj[name].push(value);
            }
        } else {
            obj[name] = value;
        }
        return obj;
    }, {});
}
| improve this answer | |
1

showing form input element fields and input file to submit your form without page refresh and grab all values with file include in it here it is

<form id="imageUploadForm"   action="" method="post" enctype="multipart/form-data">
<input type="text" class="form-control" id="fname" name='fname' placeholder="First Name" >
<input type="text" class="form-control" name='lname' id="lname" placeholder="Last Name">
<input type="number" name='phoneno'  class="form-control" id="phoneno" placeholder="Phone Number">
<textarea class="form-control" name='address' id="address" rows="5" cols="5" placeholder="Your Address"></textarea>
<input type="file" name="file" id="file" >
<input type="submit" id="sub" value="Registration">					   
</form>
on Submit button page will send ajax request to your php file.
$('#imageUploadForm').on('submit',(function(e) 
{
     fname = $('#fname').val();
     lname =  $('#lname').val();
     address =  $('#address').val();
     phoneno =  $('#phoneno').val();
     file =  $('#file').val();
     e.preventDefault();
     var formData = new FormData(this);
     formData.append('file', $('#file')[0]);
     formData.append('fname',$('#fname').val());
     formData.append('lname',$('#lname').val());
     formData.append('phoneno',$('#phoneno').val());
     formData.append('address',$('#address').val());
     $.ajax({
		type:'POST',
                url: "test.php",
                //url: '<?php echo base_url().'edit_profile/edit_profile2';?>',

                data:formData,
                cache:false,
                contentType: false,
                processData: false,
                success:function(data)
                {
                     alert('Data with file are submitted !');

                }

     });

}))

| improve this answer | |
  • What is the need of new FormData here? – Sahu V Kumar Jul 12 '17 at 18:06
  • 1
    @VishalKumarSahu i'm uploading file so that's why i use formData for that. – Mohsin Shoukat Sep 28 '17 at 11:03
1
$(form).serializeArray().reduce(function (obj, item) {
      if (obj[item.name]) {
           if ($.isArray(obj[item.name])) {
               obj[item.name].push(item.value);
           } else {
                var previousValue = obj[item.name];
                obj[item.name] = [previousValue, item.value];
           }
      } else {
           obj[item.name] = item.value;
      }

     return obj;
}, {});

It will fix issue:couldn't work with multiselects.

| improve this answer | |
0

You are all not fully correct. You cannot write:

formObj[input.name] = input.value;

Because this way if you have multiselect list - its values will be overwritten with the last one, since it's transmitted as: "param1" : "value1", "param1" : "value2".

So, correct approach is:

if (formData[input.name] === undefined) {
    formData[input.name] = input.value;
}
else {
    var inputFieldArray = $.merge([], $.isArray(formData[input.name]) ? formData[input.name] : [formData[input.name]]);
    $.merge(inputFieldArray, [input.value]);
    formData[input.name] = $.merge([], inputFieldArray);
}
| improve this answer | |
0

This method should do it. It serializes the form data and then converts them to an object. Takes care of groups of checkboxes as well.

function getFormObj(formId) {
  var formParams = {};
  $('#' + formId)
    .serializeArray()
    .forEach(function(item) {
      if (formParams[item.name]) {
        formParams[item.name] = [formParams[item.name]];
        formParams[item.name].push(item.value)
      } else {
        formParams[item.name] = item.value
      }
    });
  return formParams;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Works for checkboxes, but not for radio buttons where controls share the name attribute. – Kyle Falconer Feb 17 '16 at 19:56
0

Here is a nice vanilla JS function I wrote to extract form data as an object. It also has options for inserting additions into the object, and for clearing the form input fields.

const extractFormData = ({ form, clear, add }) => {
  return [].slice.call(form.children).filter(node => node.nodeName === 'INPUT')
  .reduce((formData, input) => {
    const value = input.value
    if (clear) { input.value = '' }
    return {
      ...formData,
      [input.name]: value
    }
  }, add)
}

Here is an example of its use with a post request:

submitGrudge(e) {
  e.preventDefault()

  const form = e.target
  const add = { id: Date.now(), forgiven: false }
  const grudge = extractFormData({ form, add, clear: true })

  // grudge = {
  //  "name": "Example name",
  //  "offense": "Example string",
  //  "date": "2017-02-16",
  //  "id": 1487877281983,
  //  "forgiven": false
  // }

  fetch('http://localhost:3001/api/grudge', {
    method: 'post',
    headers: { 'Content-Type': 'application/json' },
    body: JSON.stringify(grudge)
  })
    .then(response => response.json())
    .then(grudges => this.setState({ grudges }))
    .catch(err => console.log('error: ', err))
}
| improve this answer | |

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