31

I am developing an application with several TextField objects that need to be updated to reflect changes in associated back-end properties. The TextFields are not editable, only the back-end may change their content.

As I understand, the correct way about this is to run the heavy computation on a separate thread so as not to block the UI. I did this using javafx.concurrent.Task and communicated a single value back to the JavaFX thread using updateMessage(), which worked well. However, I need more than one value to be updated as the back-end does its crunching.

Since the back-end values are stored as JavaFX properties, I tried simply binding them to the textProperty of each GUI element and let the bindings do the work. This doesn't work, however; after running for a few moments, the TextFields stop updating even though the back-end task is still running. No exceptions are raised.

I also tried using Platform.runLater() to actively update the TextFields rather than binding. The issue here is that the runLater() tasks are scheduled faster than the platform can run them, and so the GUI becomes sluggish and needs to time to "catch up" even after the back-end task is finished.

I found a few questions on here:

Logger entries translated to the UI stops being updated with time

Multithreading in JavaFX hangs the UI

but my issue persists.

In summary: I have a back-end making changes to properties, and I want those changes to appear on the GUI. The back-end is a genetic algorithm, so its operation is broken down into discrete generations. What I would like is for the TextFields to refresh at least once in between generations, even if this delays the next generation. It is more important that the GUI responds well than that the GA runs fast.

I can post a few code examples if I haven't made the issue clear.

UPDATE

I managed to do it following James_D's suggestion. To solve the issue of the back-end having to wait for the console to print, I implemented a buffered console of sorts. It stores the strings to print in a StringBuffer and actually appends them to the TextArea when a flush() method is called. I used an AtomicBoolean to prevent the next generation from happening until the flush is complete, as it is done by a Platform.runLater() runnable. Also note that this solution is incredibly slow.

34

Not sure if I completely understand, but I think this may help.

Using Platform.runLater(...) is an appropriate approach for this.

The trick to avoiding flooding the FX Application Thread is to use an Atomic variable to store the value you're interested in. In the Platform.runLater(...) method, retrieve it and set it to a sentinel value. From your background thread, update the Atomic variable, but only issue a new Platform.runLater(...) if it's been set back to its sentinel value.

I figured this out by looking at the source code for Task. Have a look at how the updateMessage(..) method (line 1131 at the time of writing) is implemented.

Here's an example which uses the same technique. This just has a (busy) background thread which counts as fast as it can, updating an IntegerProperty. An observer watches that property and updates an AtomicInteger with the new value. If the current value of the AtomicInteger is -1, it schedules a Platform.runLater().

In the Platform.runLater, I retrieve the value of the AtomicInteger and use it to update a Label, setting the value back to -1 in the process. This signals that I am ready for another UI update.

import java.text.NumberFormat;
import java.util.concurrent.atomic.AtomicInteger;
import javafx.application.Application;
import javafx.application.Platform;
import javafx.beans.property.IntegerProperty;
import javafx.beans.property.SimpleIntegerProperty;
import javafx.beans.value.ChangeListener;
import javafx.beans.value.ObservableValue;
import javafx.event.ActionEvent;
import javafx.event.EventHandler;
import javafx.scene.Scene;
import javafx.scene.control.Button;
import javafx.scene.control.Label;
import javafx.scene.layout.AnchorPane;
import javafx.stage.Stage;

public class ConcurrentModel extends Application {

  @Override
  public void start(Stage primaryStage) {

    final AtomicInteger count = new AtomicInteger(-1);

    final AnchorPane root = new AnchorPane();
    final Label label = new Label();
    final Model model = new Model();
    final NumberFormat formatter = NumberFormat.getIntegerInstance();
    formatter.setGroupingUsed(true);
    model.intProperty().addListener(new ChangeListener<Number>() {
      @Override
      public void changed(final ObservableValue<? extends Number> observable,
          final Number oldValue, final Number newValue) {
        if (count.getAndSet(newValue.intValue()) == -1) {
          Platform.runLater(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
              long value = count.getAndSet(-1);
              label.setText(formatter.format(value));
            }
          });          
        }

      }
    });
    final Button startButton = new Button("Start");
    startButton.setOnAction(new EventHandler<ActionEvent>() {
      @Override
      public void handle(ActionEvent event) {
        model.start();
      }
    });

    AnchorPane.setTopAnchor(label, 10.0);
    AnchorPane.setLeftAnchor(label, 10.0);
    AnchorPane.setBottomAnchor(startButton, 10.0);
    AnchorPane.setLeftAnchor(startButton, 10.0);
    root.getChildren().addAll(label, startButton);

    Scene scene = new Scene(root, 100, 100);
    primaryStage.setScene(scene);
    primaryStage.show();
  }

  public static void main(String[] args) {
    launch(args);
  }

  public class Model extends Thread {
    private IntegerProperty intProperty;

    public Model() {
      intProperty = new SimpleIntegerProperty(this, "int", 0);
      setDaemon(true);
    }

    public int getInt() {
      return intProperty.get();
    }

    public IntegerProperty intProperty() {
      return intProperty;
    }

    @Override
    public void run() {
      while (true) {
        intProperty.set(intProperty.get() + 1);
      }
    }
  }
}

If you really want to "drive" the back end from the UI: that is throttle the speed of the backend implementation so you see all updates, consider using an AnimationTimer. An AnimationTimer has a handle(...) which is called once per frame render. So you could block the back-end implementation (for example by using a blocking queue) and release it once per invocation of the handle method. The handle(...) method is invoked on the FX Application Thread.

The handle(...) method takes a parameter which is a timestamp (in nanoseconds), so you can use that to slow the updates further, if once per frame is too fast.

For example:

import java.util.concurrent.ArrayBlockingQueue;
import java.util.concurrent.BlockingQueue;

import javafx.animation.AnimationTimer;
import javafx.application.Application;
import javafx.beans.property.LongProperty;
import javafx.beans.property.SimpleLongProperty;
import javafx.geometry.Insets;
import javafx.geometry.Pos;
import javafx.stage.Stage;
import javafx.scene.Scene;
import javafx.scene.control.Button;
import javafx.scene.control.TextArea;
import javafx.scene.layout.BorderPane;
import javafx.scene.layout.HBox;


public class Main extends Application {
    @Override
    public void start(Stage primaryStage) {

        final BlockingQueue<String> messageQueue = new ArrayBlockingQueue<>(1);

        TextArea console = new TextArea();

        Button startButton = new Button("Start");
        startButton.setOnAction(event -> {
            MessageProducer producer = new MessageProducer(messageQueue);
            Thread t = new Thread(producer);
            t.setDaemon(true);
            t.start();
        });

        final LongProperty lastUpdate = new SimpleLongProperty();

        final long minUpdateInterval = 0 ; // nanoseconds. Set to higher number to slow output.

        AnimationTimer timer = new AnimationTimer() {

            @Override
            public void handle(long now) {
                if (now - lastUpdate.get() > minUpdateInterval) {
                    final String message = messageQueue.poll();
                    if (message != null) {
                        console.appendText("\n" + message);
                    }
                    lastUpdate.set(now);
                }
            }

        };

        timer.start();

        HBox controls = new HBox(5, startButton);
        controls.setPadding(new Insets(10));
        controls.setAlignment(Pos.CENTER);

        BorderPane root = new BorderPane(console, null, null, controls, null);
        Scene scene = new Scene(root,600,400);
        primaryStage.setScene(scene);
        primaryStage.show();
    }

    private static class MessageProducer implements Runnable {
        private final BlockingQueue<String> messageQueue ;

        public MessageProducer(BlockingQueue<String> messageQueue) {
            this.messageQueue = messageQueue ;
        }

        @Override
        public void run() {
            long messageCount = 0 ;
            try {
                while (true) {
                    final String message = "Message " + (++messageCount);
                    messageQueue.put(message);
                }
            } catch (InterruptedException exc) {
                System.out.println("Message producer interrupted: exiting.");
            }
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        launch(args);
    }
}
  • I assumed the coalescing mentioned in the API docs was more complicated, I guess I should look first haha. Anyway this approach prevents the GUI from freezing which is good, but like I said in the last paragraph, I would also like a way to force the back-end to wait for the GUI to update, any ideas? The reason why I want this is because I have a TextArea acting as a console, but printing to it is quite time-consuming, and it's no good to arbitrarily skip prints. Like I said the GA performance is secondary, it's ok if the system is bottlenecked by the TextArea console. – eddy Apr 1 '14 at 6:25
  • 1
    Updated with an example of throttling the back-end from the UI. There are likely other ways to do it. – James_D Apr 1 '14 at 10:25
  • 1
    Thanks for the throttling example, I didn't think of using a JFX timer like that. The exceptions that might occur during put() make it a bit tricky to use with the GA though, so I decided to stick with the boolean variable for now. Thanks for the help! – eddy Apr 1 '14 at 14:47
  • 1
    BlockingQueue.put(...) doesn't throw an exception unless you interrupt the thread. – James_D Apr 1 '14 at 15:05
  • This solution is very much helpful to me. It's ideally the exact thing I needed and saves me a lot of time researching through the docs. Thanks much! – konsolebox May 22 '14 at 18:16
5

The best way to performing this is by usage of Task in JavaFx. This is be by far the best technique I've come across to update UI Controls in JavaFx.

Task task = new Task<Void>() {
    @Override public Void run() {
        static final int max = 1000000;
        for (int i=1; i<=max; i++) {
            updateProgress(i, max);
        }
        return null;
    }
};
ProgressBar bar = new ProgressBar();
bar.progressProperty().bind(task.progressProperty());
new Thread(task).start();
  • 6
    As I stated in the question, I am using Task. The problem, which was solved over a year ago, was that I had multiple values to communicate back to the main thread. Task offers a few thread-safe update methods such as updateProgress, but I was after a scalable solution not constrained to progress, message, value and title updates. – eddy Jul 23 '15 at 9:17
  • It now supports message, title and value in JDK8 – kasper Oct 30 '18 at 6:22

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