I am using Array.Parallel.map on a function but find that it is not executing at anywhere near full processor capacity. I am assuming this is because the function creates a lot of objects when running List.map and List.map2. Would this be causing a synchronization issue and is there a more appropriate way of doing this? At the moment the only way I can think of getting around this is by running each process as a separate executable using something like xargs under Linux.

I put together the script below to demonstrate the problem. It is a very basic data categorizer which relies on a field having a certain value as a rule to determine if this will predict a category:

open System

type CategoryAssessment =
    { fieldIndex: int
      value: int
      ruleAssessments: list<int> }

let InitAssessment categorizeFields rules =
    let ruleAssessments = List.init (List.length rules) (fun x -> 0)
    List.map (fun categorizeField ->
                 let fieldIndex, categoryValue = categorizeField
                 { CategoryAssessment.fieldIndex = fieldIndex;
                   value = categoryValue;
                   ruleAssessments = ruleAssessments })
              categorizeFields

let AssessCategory ruleMatches (row : int[]) categoryAssessment =
    let fieldIndex = categoryAssessment.fieldIndex
    let categoryValue = categoryAssessment.value
    let categoryMatch = categoryValue = row.[fieldIndex]
    let newRuleAssessments =
        List.map2 (fun ruleAssessment ruleMatch ->
                       if ruleMatch = categoryMatch then
                           ruleAssessment + 1
                       else
                           ruleAssessment)
                  categoryAssessment.ruleAssessments
                  ruleMatches
    { categoryAssessment with ruleAssessments = newRuleAssessments }

let MatchRule (row : int[]) rule =
    let fieldIndex, eqVal = rule
    row.[fieldIndex] = eqVal

let Assess categorizeFields rules input =
  printfn "START - Assess"
  let d = 
    Array.fold (fun categoryAssessment row ->
                 let ruleMatches = List.map (MatchRule row) rules
                 List.map (AssessCategory ruleMatches row) categoryAssessment)
             (InitAssessment categorizeFields rules)
             input
  printfn "END - Assess"
  d

let JoinAssessments assessments =
    let numAssessments = Array.length assessments
    Array.fold (fun accAssessment assessment ->
                    List.map2 (fun accCategory category ->
                                   let newRuleAssessments =
                                       List.map2 (+)
                                                 accCategory.ruleAssessments
                                                 category.ruleAssessments
                                   { accCategory with
                                         ruleAssessments = newRuleAssessments })
                              accAssessment
                              assessment)
               assessments.[0]
               assessments.[1..(numAssessments-1)]


let numRecords = 10000
let numFields = 20
let numSplits = 10
let numRules = 10000
let inputs = Array.create numSplits
                          [| for i in 1 .. (numRecords / numSplits) ->
                                [| for j in 1 .. numFields ->
                                       (i % 10) + j |] |]
let categorizeFields = [ (1, 6); (2, 3); (2, 4); (3, 2) ]
let rules = [ for i in 1 .. numRules -> (i % numFields, i) ]
let assessments =
    Array.Parallel.map (Assess categorizeFields rules) inputs
    |> JoinAssessments
printfn "Assessments: %A" assessments
0
up vote 0 down vote accepted

After a fair bit of investigation, the ultimate answer to my question seems to be to find a way of not creating lots of objects. The easiest change to do this is moving to using arrays instead of lists. I have written up my findings more fully in an article: Beware of Immutable Lists for F# Parallel Processing.

The above program when altered as follows, runs better between threads and runs much quicker even on a single thread. Further improvements can be made by making the ruleAssessments field mutable as demonstrated in the referenced article.

open System

type CategoryAssessment =
    { fieldIndex: int
      value: int
      ruleAssessments: int[] }

let InitAssessment categorizeFields rules =
    let ruleAssessments = Array.create (Array.length rules) 0
    Array.map (fun categorizeField ->
                   let fieldIndex, categoryValue = categorizeField
                   { CategoryAssessment.fieldIndex = fieldIndex;
                     value = categoryValue;
                     ruleAssessments = ruleAssessments })
              categorizeFields

let AssessCategory ruleMatches (row : int[]) categoryAssessment =
    let fieldIndex = categoryAssessment.fieldIndex
    let categoryValue = categoryAssessment.value
    let categoryMatch = categoryValue = row.[fieldIndex]
    let newRuleAssessments =
        Array.map2 (fun ruleAssessment ruleMatch ->
                        if ruleMatch = categoryMatch then
                            ruleAssessment + 1
                        else
                            ruleAssessment)
                   categoryAssessment.ruleAssessments
                   ruleMatches
    { categoryAssessment with ruleAssessments = newRuleAssessments }

let MatchRule (row : int[]) rule =
    let fieldIndex, eqVal = rule
    row.[fieldIndex] = eqVal

let Assess categorizeFields rules input =
  printfn "START - Assess"
  let d =
    Array.fold (fun categoryAssessment row ->
                 let ruleMatches = Array.map (MatchRule row) rules
                 Array.map (AssessCategory ruleMatches row) categoryAssessment)
               (InitAssessment categorizeFields rules)
               input
  printfn "END - Assess"
  d

let JoinAssessments assessments =
    let numAssessments = Array.length assessments
    Array.fold (fun accAssessment assessment ->
                    Array.map2 (fun accCategory category ->
                                    let newRuleAssessments =
                                        Array.map2 (+)
                                                   accCategory.ruleAssessments
                                                   category.ruleAssessments
                                    { accCategory with
                                          ruleAssessments = newRuleAssessments })
                               accAssessment
                               assessment)
               assessments.[0]
               assessments.[1..(numAssessments-1)]


let numRecords = 10000
let numFields = 20
let numSplits = 10
let numRules = 10000
let inputs = Array.create numSplits
                          [| for i in 1 .. (numRecords / numSplits) ->
                                [| for j in 1 .. numFields ->
                                       (i % 10) + j |] |]
let categorizeFields = [| (1, 6); (2, 3); (2, 4); (3, 2) |]
let rules = [| for i in 1 .. numRules -> (i % numFields, i) |]

let assessments =
    Array.Parallel.map (Assess categorizeFields rules) inputs
    |> JoinAssessments
printfn "Assessments: %A" assessments
0

This is a version of your program that doesn't require mutability and uses nearly all of the 4 cpus on my iMac.

To pull it off, it's driven by assessing each rule in parallel, not by processing records. That also required the input array to be transposed making it be fields by records.

open System

type CategoryAssessment =
    { fieldIndex: int
      value: int
      ruleAssessments: list<int> }

let MatchRule rVal fVal  =
        rVal = fVal

let AssessRule cMatches (inputs:int[][]) (rIndex, rVal) =
//    printfn "START - Assess"  // uses more cpu than the code itself
    let matches = inputs.[rIndex] |> 
                  Array.map2 (fun cVal fVal -> (MatchRule rVal fVal) = cVal) cMatches
    let assessment = matches |> 
                     Array.map ( fun v -> if v then 1 else 0  ) |> 
                     Array.sum
//    printfn "END - Assess"
    assessment

let Assess categorizeFields rules (inputs:int[][]) =
    categorizeFields |> List.map (fun (catIndex, catValue) ->
        let catMatches = inputs.[catIndex] |> Array.map( fun v -> v = catValue )
        let assessments = rules |> Array.Parallel.map 
                                    (AssessRule catMatches inputs) 
                                 |> Array.toList
        { CategoryAssessment.fieldIndex = catIndex; 
          value = catValue; 
          ruleAssessments = assessments }  
    )

let numRecords = 10000
let numFields = 20
let numRules = 10000
let inputs = [| for j in 1 .. numFields ->
                [| for i in 1 .. numRecords -> (i % 10) + j |] |]
let categorizeFields = [ (1, 6); (2, 3); (2, 4); (3, 2) ]
let rules = [| for i in 1 .. numRules -> (i % numFields, i) |]
let assessments = Assess categorizeFields rules inputs
printfn "Assessments: %A" assessments

Assessing by rule allowed the summing of a single integer across all records for a given rule, avoiding mutable state and extra memory allocations.

I used a lot of array iteration to get the speed up but didn't remove all the lists.

I fear I changed the functionality while refactoring or made assumptions that can't be applied to your actual problem, however I do hope it's a useful example.

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