1

Using Python Unittest, here's an example of a test suite :

import unittest

# Here's our "unit".
def IsOdd(n):
    return n % 2 == 1

# Here's our "unit tests".
class IsOddTests(unittest.TestCase):

    def testOne(self):
        self.failUnless(IsOdd(1))

    def testTwo(self):
        self.failIf(IsOdd(2))

def main():
    unittest.main(verbosity=2)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()

And the result :

testOne (__main__.IsOddTests) ... ok
testTwo (__main__.IsOddTests) ... ok

----------------------------------------------------------------------
Ran 2 tests in 0.000s

OK

Is it possible to enhance the display of the tests, something like :

Testing ODD method
Testing with value is 1 (__main__.IsOddTests) ... ok
Testing with value is 2 (__main__.IsOddTests) ... ok

----------------------------------------------------------------------
Ran 2 tests in 0.000s

OK

What I'm trying to do, is in case of a lot of tests, displaying a Group name for each TestCase (that contains multiple tests), and a name for each tests (that should be more explicit than just the function name).

1 Answer 1

8

To do this simply set a docstring for your tests:

def testOne(self):
    """Test IsOdd(1)"""
    self.failUnless(IsOdd(1))

def testTwo(self):
    """Test IsOdd(2)"""
    self.failIf(IsOdd(2))

There's a bit of an art to picking docstrings for your tests that will make sense later. Don't be afraid to go back and refactor your things.

3
  • 1
    Awesome for naming my tests, and for my classes now, I tried the docstring too, but without any luck. Any idea?
    – Cyril N.
    Apr 1, 2014 at 9:50
  • I don't believe that unittest.py uses the docstring from the class anywhere, at least in the versions I've checked. (Look for __doc__ in the .py file).
    – Tim Potter
    Apr 1, 2014 at 10:34
  • I made my own. I added a __display__ in each class, and in a root class, I look for this var and display it in setUpClass ;)
    – Cyril N.
    Apr 1, 2014 at 11:33

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