I'm trying to use javascript to convert a date object into a valid mysql date - what is the best way to do this?

12 Answers 12

up vote 28 down vote accepted

Probably best to use a library like Date.js (although that hasn't been maintained in years) or Moment.js.

But to do it manually, you can use Date#getFullYear(), Date#getMonth() (it starts with 0 = January, so you probably want + 1), and Date#getDate() (day of month). Just pad out the month and day to two characters, e.g.:

(function() {
    Date.prototype.toYMD = Date_toYMD;
    function Date_toYMD() {
        var year, month, day;
        year = String(this.getFullYear());
        month = String(this.getMonth() + 1);
        if (month.length == 1) {
            month = "0" + month;
        }
        day = String(this.getDate());
        if (day.length == 1) {
            day = "0" + day;
        }
        return year + "-" + month + "-" + day;
    }
})();

Usage:

var dt = new Date();
var str = dt.toYMD();

Note that the function has a name, which is useful for debugging purposes, but because of the anonymous scoping function there's no pollution of the global namespace.

That uses local time; for UTC, just use the UTC versions (getUTCFullYear, etc.).

Caveat: I just threw that out, it's completely untested.

To get date

new Date().toJSON().slice(0, 10)
//2015-07-23

for datetime

new Date().toJSON().slice(0, 19).replace('T', ' ')
//2015-07-23 11:26:00

Note, that resulting date / datetime will always be in UTC timezone

  • 2
    OP wants a MySQL DATE object, not a DATETIME, so you need "/T.*/" instead of "'T'". apart from that, wondering why this is not the most upvoted answer? – xShirase Sep 13 '14 at 17:15
  • 1
    Why Not this? (new Date()).toISOString().substring(0, 10) – crickeys Jan 20 '15 at 22:57
  • 1
    the best answer – eugen sunic Apr 19 '16 at 15:55
  • 1
    A slight variation on the same theme: (new Date()).toISOString().split(/[T\.]/).slice(0,2).join(' ') – Andrew Eddie Apr 19 '16 at 23:33
  • 2
    Just a note that this won't work for years over 9999 ;) – Kuba Holuj Aug 30 '17 at 21:59

This worked for me, just edit the string instead:

var myDate = new Date();
var myDate_string = myDate.toISOString();
var myDate_string = myDate_string.replace("T"," ");
var myDate_string = myDate_string.substring(0, myDate_string.length - 5);
  • 3
    There are quite a few things wrong here. Do not redeclare var. Read about "hoisting". Furthermore, this is sufficient, new Date().toISOString().slice(0, 10). – Gajus Dec 1 '13 at 12:00
  • @Gajus for me Date().toISOString().slice(0, 10) was not sufficient fails with several dates - wrong by 1 day for 7th June 1979 for instance – user1302114 Mar 10 '14 at 1:45
  • 1
    -1 when you use toISOString() you are converting the date from the timezone shown into UTC time. So for example if the web page you are looking at is on GMT-6 and showing a GMT-6 time and your browser is running on a computer that is GMT-5 then when you use toISOString() you will now have a UTC time that 5 hours off the webpage instead of 6 – gillyspy Jul 22 '14 at 15:47
function js2Sql(cDate) {
    return cDate.getFullYear()
           + '-'
           + ("0" + (cDate.getMonth()+1)).slice(-2)
           + '-'
           + ("0" + cDate.getDate()).slice(-2);
}

A bit of a typo in the first example, when a day has a length less than 1 it is adding the month instead of the day to the result.

Works great though if you change:

    if (day.length == 1) {
        day = "0" + month;
    }

to

    if (day.length == 1) {
        day = "0" + day;
    }

Thanks for posting that script.

The corrected function looks like:

Date.prototype.toYMD = Date_toYMD;
function Date_toYMD() {
    var year, month, day;
    year = String(this.getFullYear());
    month = String(this.getMonth() + 1);
    if (month.length == 1) {
        month = "0" + month;
    }
    day = String(this.getDate());
    if (day.length == 1) {
        day = "0" + day;
    }
    return year + "-" + month + "-" + day;
}

The shortest version of https://stackoverflow.com/a/11453710/3777994:

/**
 * MySQL date
 * @param {Date} [date] Optional date object
 * @returns {string}
 */
function mysqlDate(date){
    date = date || new Date();
    return date.toISOString().split('T')[0];
}

Using:

var date = mysqlDate(); //'2014-12-05'

just this :

Object.defineProperties( Date.prototype ,{
    date:{
         get:function(){return this.toISOString().split('T')[0];}
    },
    time:{
         get:function(){return this.toTimeString().match(/\d{2}:\d{2}:\d{2}/)[0];}
    },
    datetime:{
         get : function(){return this.date+" "+this.time}
    }
});

now you can use

sql_query = "...." + (new Date).datetime + "....";
  • works only IE9+ – bortunac Jul 25 '15 at 14:54

I needed this for a filename and with the time in the current timezone.

const timezoneOffset = (new Date()).getTimezoneOffset() * 60000;

const date = (new Date(Date.now() - timezoneOffset))
    .toISOString()
    .substring(0, 19)
    .replace('T', '')       // replace T with a space
    .replace(/ /g, "_")     // replace spaces with an underscore
    .replace(/\:/g, ".");   // replace colons with a dot

Source

From JS date to Mysql date format conversion you can simply do this:

date.toISOString().split("T")[0]

Take a look at this handy library for all your date formatting needs: http://blog.stevenlevithan.com/archives/date-time-format

// function
getDate = function(dateObj){
    var day = dateObj.getDay() < 9 ? '0'+dateObj.getDay():dateObj.getDay();
    var month = dateObj.getMonth() < 9 ? '0'+dateObj.getMonth():dateObj.getMonth();
    return dateObj.getFullYear()+'-'+month+'-'+day;
}

// example usage
console.log(getDate(new Date()));

// with custom date
console.log(getDate(new Date(2012,dateObj.getMonth()-30,dateObj.getDay()));

Can be!

function Date_toYMD(d)
{
    var year, month, day;
    year = String(d.getFullYear());
    month = String(d.getMonth() + 1);
    if (month.length == 1) {
        month = "0" + month;
    }
    day = String(d.getDate());
    if (day.length == 1) {
        day = "0" + day;
    }
    return year + "-" + month + "-" + day;
}

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