7

This question already has an answer here:

I use the .NET 4 (not .NET 4.5 or any other version of the framework!)

Why different versions of Visual Studio will output different result of the same code using the SAME .NET Framework?

I have the following

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var values = new List<int>() { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 };
    var funcs = new List<Func<int>>();

    foreach (var v in values) {
        funcs.Add(() => v * 10);
    }

    foreach (var f in funcs) {
        Console.WriteLine(f());
    }

    Console.ReadKey();
}

In Visual Studio 2013 the output is 10 20 30 40 50 (Target .NET v == 4).
In Visual Studio 2010 the output is 50 50 50 50 50 (Target .NET v == 4).

Where is the problem? How to identify the C# (not the .NET!) version used by each Studio for the .NET 4

C:\Windows\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v4.0.30319>csc /?
Microsoft (R) Visual C# Compiler version 4.0.30319.33440
for Microsoft (R) .NET Framework 4.5

C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 10.0\VC>csc /?
Microsoft (R) Visual C# Compiler version 4.0.30319.33440
for Microsoft (R) .NET Framework 4.5

C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 12.0>csc /?
Microsoft (R) Visual C# Compiler version 12.0.30110.0
for C# 5

EDIT

Can I say that

VS 2010 == C# 4
VS 2013 == C# 5

and this independently of the target framework of the concrete solution?

marked as duplicate by Habib, Damien_The_Unbeliever, Scott Chamberlain, Raging Bull, Blazemonger Apr 2 '14 at 14:02

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • I display the output of csc /? on my machine – serhio Apr 2 '14 at 13:05
  • I think it's explained in Has foreach's use of variables been changed in C# 5?. – Andrew Morton Apr 2 '14 at 13:07
  • @Habib not a duplicate. my question is why different Visual Studio targeting the same .Net outputs different result – serhio Apr 2 '14 at 13:07
  • 3
    @serhio Yes, if you targeted .NET 2.0 it would still use the C# 5 compiler. The compiler version and the framework version are totally independent of each other. The compiler version is decided by which version of VS you use but it is fixed and the framework version is settable by project. – Scott Chamberlain Apr 2 '14 at 13:11
  • 1
    The question is now wrong. 2013 automatically installs framework 4.5.1 and targets that automatically – Amit Joki Apr 2 '14 at 13:12
9

From Eric Lippert's blog post:

In C# 5, the loop variable of a foreach will be logically inside the loop, and therefore closures will close over a fresh copy of the variable each time.

And a quote from MSDN:

Visual Studio 2010 will not let you develop using C# 5. The new C# 5 language features are part of the compiler, and will be included in the Visual Studio 2012 compiler. Even if you install .NET 4.5, this will not let you take advantage of the new features of the language (such as async/await), as these require a new compiler to use.

VS2013 works with only C# 5.0 compiler and you can target various .NET frameworks. Because of this, you use get C# 5.0 features like async/await and still target .NET 4.0.

  • When I target VS 2013 to the .NET 4 framework, it also uses the C# 5 compiler? – serhio Apr 2 '14 at 13:11
  • 3
    @serhio: Yes, right. VS2013 works with only C# 5.0 compiler and you can target various .NET frameworks. Because of this, you use get C# 5.0 features like async/await and still target .NET 4.0. – YK1 Apr 2 '14 at 13:16
  • 1
    Added the comment to the answer, very relevant. – Ofiris Apr 2 '14 at 13:21
  • 2
    @serhio: To get the required types for async/await, add NuGet package Microsoft.Bcl.Async. See stackoverflow.com/questions/22060691/… – YK1 Apr 2 '14 at 13:36
  • 1
    @serhio: Yes, C# version is marketing name. C# compiler version is internal version - which they can update/hotfix. They cannot hotfix marketing names. I don't see what is your confusion. Anyway, one correction, VS2013 toolsVersion is 12.0 - not 13.0. – YK1 Apr 2 '14 at 14:06

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.