What algorithms (preferably with code) exist to move a large set of x-y points to the nearest point on a grid, without allowing multiple points to occupy the same position?

Say I have 50,000 red or green points, each with a different (x,y) position in continuous space. I wish to use a pixel-oriented display so that each point occupies pixel on an 800x800 px canvas, with the points displaced as little as possible from their original positions (e.g. minimising the squared displacement distance).

Keim's GridFit algorithm seems to be one way to do it, but I can't find an implementation online, and it was published rather a long time ago. Are there any implementations of GridFit available? Even better, are there more recent techniques that use displacement to avoid overlapping points (generalisable to squares/points of arbitrary uniform size) on a scatterplot?

  • And if you have, say 200 points whose closest grid point is, say (100, 100), do you really want to keep spreading them out further and further from their true location, giving more inaccurate results for each subsequent point? It might be better to deal with close matches by using a different colored point or a different shaped marker or an annotation or something. Otherwise your 200th point near a particular value may end up being plotted ~16 grid points away from its true position... – twalberg Apr 2 '14 at 14:06
  • Actually, in this case I don't mind, since the x-y position of the points is - perhaps strangely - less important than the proportion of red/green points. It would be nice to have them somewhat close to the original, though. I could also abort if some measure of the displacement was too great. – user2667066 Apr 2 '14 at 14:13
  • P.s. although this isn't my aim, you could also imagine this as optimally placing a large number of georeferenced square thumbnail images over an image of a map, with the problem that images may be crowded into certain regions and entirely absent from others. In this case what I call a "pixel" above might actually be (say) a 40x40px thumbnail, with a couple of thousand thumbnails to place onto a 10 megapixel map image. The aim would be to minimise the length of lines linking a picture to its geolocation. It's not exactly the same, of course, but a reasonably similar problem. – user2667066 Apr 2 '14 at 14:20

In theory you can solve this optimally using maximum weighted bipartite matching. But this takes time cubic in the number of points, which will be too slow for such large n.

There are probably much faster heuristics that start from the same formulation as the exact solution, so it might nevertheless be useful to explain how you would set it up:

Let A be a set of vertices corresponding to the input points, and B be a set of vertices corresponding to all the grid points, and for every pair of points (a, b) with a in A and b in B, you would create an edge (a, b) with weight equal to the negative of the Euclidean distance between a and b. You could then throw this at the Hungarian algorithm, and it would tell you which grid point (if any) gets matched to each input point.

  • Thanks. Useful to know the optimal solution, but as you say, probably too slow for general use here. I presume someone may well have implemented fast heuristic methods based on what you say? It seems like an obvious dataviz problem. – user2667066 Apr 2 '14 at 23:34

For the moment, I've implemented a version of GridFit in Python. If anyone else wants to use it, feel free - I'm happy for this to be under CC-Zero. There are probably ways to improve the algorithm, for example by using the point distribution (rather than the aspect ratio of the box) to choose when to bisect vertically and when horizontally.

import numpy as np

def bisect(points, indices, bottom_left, top_right):
    '''Freely redistributable Python implementation by Yan Wong of the pixel-fitting "Gridfit" algorithm as described in: Keim, D. A. 
    and Herrmann, A. (1998) The Gridfit algorithm: an efficient and effective approach to visualizing large amounts of spatial data. 
    Proceedings of the Conference on Visualization \'98, 181-188.

    The implementation here differs in 2 main respects from that in the paper. Firstly areas are not always bisected in horizontal then vertical order, 
    instead they are bisected horizontally if the area is taller then wide, and vertically if wider than tall. Secondly, a single pass algorithm
    is used which produces greater consistency, in that the order of the points in the dataset does not determine the outcome (unless points have
    identical X or Y values. Details are described in comments within the code.'''
    if len(indices)==0:
        return
    width_minus_height = np.diff(top_right - bottom_left)
    if width_minus_height == 0:
        #bisect on the dimension which best splits up the point to each side of the midline
        evenness = np.abs(np.mean(points[indices] < (top_right+bottom_left)/2.0, axis=0)-0.5)
        dim = int(evenness[0] > evenness[1])
    else:
        dim = int(width_minus_height > 0) #if if wider than tall, bisect on dim = 1
    minpix = bottom_left[dim]
    maxpix = top_right[dim]
    size = maxpix-minpix
    if size == 1: # we are done: set the position of the point to the middle of the pix
        if len(indices) > 1: print "ERROR" #sanity check: remove for faster speed
        points[indices, :] = bottom_left+0.5
        return
    other_dim = top_right[1-dim] - bottom_left[1-dim]

    cutpoint_from = (maxpix+minpix)/2.0
    cutpoint_to = None
    lower_cut = int(np.floor(cutpoint_from))
    upper_cut = int(np.ceil(cutpoint_from))
    lower = points[indices, dim] < lower_cut
    upper = points[indices, dim] >= upper_cut
    lower_points = indices[lower] 
    upper_points = indices[upper]

    if lower_cut!=upper_cut: # initial cutpoint falls between pixels. If cutpoint will not shift, we need to round it up or down to the nearest integer
        mid_points = indices[np.logical_and(~lower, ~upper)]
        low_cut_lower = len(lower_points) <= (lower_cut - minpix) * other_dim
        low_cut_upper = len(upper_points) + len(mid_points) <= (maxpix-lower_cut) * other_dim
        up_cut_lower = len(lower_points) + len(mid_points) <= (upper_cut-minpix) * other_dim
        up_cut_upper = len(upper_points) <= (maxpix-upper_cut) * other_dim
        low_cut_OK = (low_cut_lower and low_cut_upper)
        up_cut_OK = (up_cut_lower and up_cut_upper)

        if low_cut_OK and not up_cut_OK:
            cutpoint_from = lower_cut
            upper_points = np.append(upper_points, mid_points)
        elif up_cut_OK and not low_cut_OK:
            cutpoint_from = upper_cut
            lower_points = np.append(lower_points, mid_points)
        else:
            lowmean = np.mean(points[indices, dim]) < cutpoint_from
            if low_cut_OK and up_cut_OK:
                if (lowmean):
                    cutpoint_from = lower_cut
                    upper_points = np.append(upper_points, mid_points)
                else:
                    cutpoint_from = upper_cut
                    lower_points = np.append(lower_points, mid_points)
            else:
                #if neither low_cut_OK or up_cut_OK, we will end up shifting the cutpoint to an integer value anyway => no need to round up or down
                lower_points = indices[points[indices, dim] < cutpoint_from]
                upper_points = indices[points[indices, dim] >= cutpoint_from]
                if (lowmean):
                    cutpoint_to = lower_cut
                else:
                    cutpoint_to = upper_cut
    else:
        if len(lower_points) > (cutpoint_from-minpix) * other_dim or len(upper_points) > (maxpix-cutpoint_from) * other_dim:
            top = maxpix - len(upper_points) * 1.0 / other_dim
            bot = minpix + len(lower_points) * 1.0 / other_dim
            if len(lower_points) > len(upper_points):
                cutpoint_to = int(np.floor(bot))  #shift so that the area with most points shifted as little as poss
                #cutpoint_to = int(np.floor(top))  #alternative shift giving area with most points max to play with: seems to give worse results

            elif len(lower_points) < len(upper_points):
                cutpoint_to = int(np.ceil(top))  #shift so that the area with most points shifted as little as poss
                #cutpoint_to = int(np.ceil(bot))  #alternative shift giving area with most points max to play with: seems to give worse results        


    if cutpoint_to is None:
        cutpoint_to = cutpoint_from 
    else:
        # As identified in the Gridfit paper, we may still not be able to fit points into the space, if they fall on the dividing line, e.g.
        # imagine 9 pixels (3x3), with 5 points on one side of the (integer) cut line and 4 on the other. For consistency, and to avoid 2 passes
        # we simply pick a different initial cutoff line, so that one or more points are shifted between the initial lower and upper regions
        #
        # At the same time we can deal with cases when we have 2 identical values, by adding or subtracting a small increment to the first in the list
        cutpoint_to = np.clip(cutpoint_to, minpix+1, maxpix-1) #this means we can get away with fewer recursions

        if len(lower_points) > (cutpoint_to - minpix) * other_dim:
            sorted_indices = indices[np.argsort(points[indices, dim])]
            while True:
                cutoff_index = np.searchsorted(points[sorted_indices, dim], cutpoint_from, 'right')
                if cutoff_index <= (cutpoint_to - minpix) * other_dim:
                    lower_points = sorted_indices[:cutoff_index]
                    upper_points = sorted_indices[cutoff_index:]
                    break;
                below = sorted_indices[cutoff_index + [-1,-2] ]
                if (np.diff(points[below, dim])==0): #rare: only if points have exactly the same value. If so, shift the upper one up a bit
                    points[below[0], dim] += min(0.001, np.diff(points[sorted_indices[slice(cutoff_index-1, cutoff_index+1)], dim]))
                cutpoint_from = np.mean(points[below, dim]) #place new cutpoint between the two points below the current cutpoint

        if len(upper_points) > (maxpix - cutpoint_to) * other_dim:
            sorted_indices = indices[np.argsort(points[indices, dim])]
            while True:
                cutoff_index = np.searchsorted(points[sorted_indices, dim], cutpoint_from, 'left')
                if len(sorted_indices)-cutoff_index <= (maxpix - cutpoint_to) * other_dim:
                    lower_points = sorted_indices[:cutoff_index]
                    upper_points = sorted_indices[cutoff_index:]
                    break;
                above = sorted_indices[cutoff_index + [0,1] ]
                if (np.diff(points[above, dim])==0): #rare: only if points have exactly the same value. If so, shift the lower one down a bit
                    points[above[0], dim] -= min(0.001, np.diff(points[sorted_indices[slice(cutoff_index-1, cutoff_index+1)], dim]))
                cutpoint_from = np.mean(points[above, dim]) #place new cutpoint above the two points below the current cutpoint


        #transform so that lower set of points runs from minpix .. cutpoint_to instead of minpix ... cutpoint_from
        points[lower_points, dim] = (points[lower_points, dim] - minpix) * (cutpoint_to - minpix)/(cutpoint_from - minpix) + minpix
        #scale so that upper set of points runs from cutpoint_to .. maxpix instead of cutpoint_from ... maxpix
        points[upper_points, dim] = (points[upper_points, dim] - cutpoint_from) * (maxpix - cutpoint_to)/(maxpix - cutpoint_from) + cutpoint_to

    select_dim = np.array([1-dim, dim])
    bisect(points, lower_points, bottom_left, top_right * (1-select_dim) + cutpoint_to * select_dim)
    bisect(points, upper_points, bottom_left * (1-select_dim) + cutpoint_to * select_dim, top_right)


#visualise an example
from Tkinter import *
n_pix, scale = 500, 15
np.random.seed(12345)
#test on 2 normally distributed point clouds
all_points = np.vstack((np.random.randn(n_pix//2, 2) * 3 + 30, np.random.randn(n_pix//2, 2) * 6  + 2))
#all_points = np.rint(all_points*50).astype(np.int)/50.0 #test if the algorithm works with rounded
bl, tr = np.floor(np.min(all_points, 0)), np.ceil(np.max(all_points, 0))

print "{} points to distribute among {} = {} pixels".format(all_points.shape[0], "x".join(np.char.mod("%i", tr-bl)), np.prod(tr-bl))
if np.prod(tr-bl) > n_pix:
    pts = all_points.copy()
    bisect(all_points, np.arange(all_points.shape[0]), bl, tr) 
    print np.hstack((pts,all_points))
    print "Mean distance between original and new point = {}".format(np.mean(np.sqrt(np.sum((pts - all_points)**2, 1))))

    master = Tk()
    hw = (tr-bl)* scale +1
    win = Canvas(master, width=hw[1], height=hw[0])
    win.pack()
    all_points = (all_points-bl) * scale
    pts = (pts-bl) * scale
    for i in range(pts.shape[0]):
        win.create_line(int(pts[i,1]), int(pts[i,0]), int(all_points[i,1]), int(all_points[i,0]))
    for i in range(all_points.shape[0]):
        win.create_oval(int(pts[i,1])-2, int(pts[i,0])-2, int(pts[i,1])+2, int(pts[i,0])+2, fill="blue")
    for i in range(all_points.shape[0]):
        win.create_oval(int(all_points[i,1])-3, int(all_points[i,0])-3, int(all_points[i,1])+3, int(all_points[i,0])+3, fill="red")
    mainloop()

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