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I am quite confused about the ways to specify the number of threads in parallel part of a code. I know I can use:

  1. the enviromental variable OMP_NUM_THREADS
  2. function omp_set_num_threads(int)
  3. num_threads(int) in #pragma omp parallel for num_threads(NB_OF_THREADS)

What I have gathered so far the first two are equivalent. But what about the third one? Can someone provide a more detailed exposition of the difference, I could not find any information in the internet regarding the difference between 1/2 and 3.

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OMP_NUM_THREADS and omp_set_num_threads() are not equivalent. The environment variable is only used to set the initial value of the nthreads-var ICV (internal control variable) which controls the maximum number of threads in a team. omp_set_num_threads() can be used to change the value of nthreads-var at any time (outside of any parallel regions, of course) and affects all subsequent parallel regions. Therefore setting a value, e.g. n, to OMP_NUM_THREADS is equivalent to calling omp_set_num_threads(n) before the very first parallel region is encountered.

The algorithm to determine the number of threads in a parallel region is very clearly described in the OpenMP specification that is available freely on the OpenMP website:

if a num_threads clause exists

then let ThreadsRequested be the value of the num_threads clause expression;

else let ThreadsRequested = value of the first element of nthreads-var;

That priority of the different ways to set nthreads-var is listed in the ICV Override Relationships part of the specification:

The num_threads clause and omp_set_num_threads() override the value of the OMP_NUM_THREADS environment variable and the initial value of the first element of the nthreads-var ICV.

Translated into human language, that is:

  • OMP_NUM_THREADS (if present) specifies initially the number of threads;
  • calls to omp_set_num_threads() override the value of OMP_NUM_THREADS;
  • the presence of the num_threads clause overrides both other values.

The actual number of threads used is also affected by whether dynamic team sizes are enabled (dyn-var ICV settable via OMP_DYNAMIC and/or omp_set_dynamic()), by whether a thread limit is imposed by thread-limit-var (settable via OMP_THREAD_LIMIT), as well as by whether nested parallelism (OMP_NESTED / omp_set_nested()) is enabled or not.

  • When you say "the presence of the num_threads clause overrides both other values", what is the scope? Is num_threads program wide, or is it just for the OMP block? If num_threads is program wide, then how do we change the thread count for just an OMP block? – jww May 20 '18 at 13:57
  • @jww, the scope of the num_threads clause is the region to which it is applied. – Hristo Iliev May 20 '18 at 19:30
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Think of it like scope. Option 3 (num_threads) sets the number of threads for the current team of threads only. The other options are global/state settings. I generally don't set the number of threads and instead I just use the defaults. When I do change the number of threads it's usually only in special cases so I use option three so that the next time I use a parallel team it goes back to the global (default) setting. See the code below. After I use option 3 the next team of threads goes back to the last global setting.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <omp.h>

int main() {
    #pragma omp parallel
    {
        #pragma omp single
        {
            printf("%d\n", omp_get_num_threads());
        }
    }
    omp_set_num_threads(8);
    #pragma omp parallel
    {
        #pragma omp single
        {
            printf("%d\n", omp_get_num_threads());
        }
    }

    #pragma omp parallel num_threads(2)
    {
        #pragma omp single
        {
            printf("%d\n", omp_get_num_threads());
        }
    }

    #pragma omp parallel
    {
        #pragma omp single
        {
            printf("%d\n", omp_get_num_threads());
        }
    }       
}

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