foo:/opt/bar$ git status
# On branch develop
nothing to commit (working directory clean)

foo:/opt/bar$ git pull --rebase origin develop
From ssh://xxx/yyy
* branch develop -> FETCH_HEAD
First, rewinding head to replay your work on top of it...
Applying: Subscription logging added.
Using index info to reconstruct a base tree...
<stdin>:120: trailing whitespace.
* @return integer
<stdin>:143: trailing whitespace.
* @return integer
<stdin>:166: trailing whitespace.
* @return integer
<stdin>:189: trailing whitespace.
* @return integer
<stdin>:212: trailing whitespace.
* @return integer
warning: squelched 3 whitespace errors
warning: 8 lines add whitespace errors.
Falling back to patching base and 3-way merge...
Auto-merging app/config/config.yml
CONFLICT (content): Merge conflict in app/config/config.yml
Failed to merge in the changes.
Patch failed at 0001 Subscription logging added.

When you have resolved this problem run "git rebase --continue".
If you would prefer to skip this patch, instead run "git rebase --skip".
To check out the original branch and stop rebasing run "git rebase --abort".

foo:/opt/bar$ git status
# Not currently on any branch.
# Unmerged paths:
# (use "git reset HEAD <file>..." to unstage)
# (use "git add/rm <file>..." as appropriate to mark resolution)
#
# both modified: app/config/config.yml
#
no changes added to commit (use "git add" and/or "git commit -a")

foo:/opt/bar$ git add -A

foo:/opt/bar$ git status
# Not currently on any branch.
nothing to commit (working directory clean)

foo:/opt/bar$ git rebase --continue
Applying: Subscription logging added.
No changes - did you forget to use 'git add'?
If there is nothing left to stage, chances are that something else
already introduced the same changes; you might want to skip this patch.

When you have resolved this problem run "git rebase --continue".
If you would prefer to skip this patch, instead run "git rebase --skip".
To check out the original branch and stop rebasing run "git rebase --abort".

foo:/opt/bar$ git add -A

foo:/opt/bar$ git status
# Not currently on any branch.
nothing to commit (working directory clean)

foo:/opt/bar$ git rebase --continue
Applying: Subscription logging added.
No changes - did you forget to use 'git add'?
If there is nothing left to stage, chances are that something else
already introduced the same changes; you might want to skip this patch.

When you have resolved this problem run "git rebase --continue".
If you would prefer to skip this patch, instead run "git rebase --skip".
To check out the original branch and stop rebasing run "git rebase --abort".

foo:/opt/bar$
  • 1
    did you try skipping that change with --skip? it may just be fixing some trailing whitespace problem which has been resolved in the incoming commits (boiling down to a no-op) – guido Apr 2 '14 at 14:31
  • 1
    Likely after performing the merge, app/config/config.yml isn't changed. So you should simply --skip this commit – user3159253 Apr 2 '14 at 15:03
  • @LajosVeres, No files need merging <<< git mergetool – Roman Newaza Apr 3 '14 at 8:36
  • Note: Make sure to use a Git 2.0.2+ (July 2014) to be sure the git rebase --skip works properly. See my answer below – VonC Aug 3 '14 at 17:49
  • dup: stackoverflow.com/questions/14410421/… – nobar Oct 3 '15 at 15:26
up vote 38 down vote accepted

You are on the right path. You just need to use skip the commit on which you have problems:

git rebase --skip

You have fixed the conflict, but this has resulted in no changes compared to the previous commit. In this case you cannot just git rebase --continue, because you are telling Git to create an empty commit, which is not allowed.

If you have conflicts for any other commits you should still use git rebase --continue.

The --skip option is also useful when you don't want to include certain commit at all in the newly produced history.

  • 2
    This is the correct answer, but I'll note that the first few times I ran into this, it always seemed scary to use git rebase --skip: was I really sure it was OK to skip this? And, a side note: technically, an empty commit is possible, it just requires --allow-empty which git rebase does not supply. – torek Apr 2 '14 at 18:48
  • @Torek, so how do you use --allow-empty if rebase doesn't support it? – Roman Newaza Apr 3 '14 at 8:31
  • 1
    It would be nice if Git developers improve messages for this specific case to help others understand what to do – Roman Newaza Apr 3 '14 at 8:34
  • 1
    @RomanNewaza: it's only available in regular git commit. You could make an empty commit manually if you really wanted to, then skip the empty commit that the rebase can't add. But then you need to have some reason for making/keeping the empty commit, and during a rebase, I'm not sure what that would be. – torek Apr 3 '14 at 10:34
  • @torek, I'm not going to do it :) – Roman Newaza Apr 3 '14 at 12:23

git rebase --skip is indeed the right solution, except there is a case where it would get stuck and wouldn't be able to go on with the current rebase.

Git 2.0.2 (July 2014) has fixed that bug: see commit 95104c7 by brian m. carlson (bk2204):

rebase--merge: fix --skip with two conflicts in a row

If git rebase --merge encountered a conflict, --skip would not work if the next commit also conflicted.
The msgnum file would never be updated with the new patch number, so no patch would actually be skipped, resulting in an inescapable loop.

Update the msgnum file's value as the first thing in call_merge.
This also avoids an "Already applied" message when skipping a commit.
There is no visible change for the other contexts in which call_merge is invoked, as the msgnum file's value remains unchanged in those situations.

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