284

A user has many uploads. I want to add a column to the uploads table that references the user. What should the migration look like?

Here is what I have. I'm not sure if I should use (1) :user_id, :int or (2) :user, :references. I'm not even sure if (2) works. Just trying to do this the "rails" way.

class AddUserToUploads < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    add_column :uploads, :user_id, :integer
  end
end

Relevant question except for Rails 3. Rails 3 migrations: Adding reference column?

647
+150

Rails 4.x

When you already have users and uploads tables and wish to add a new relationship between them.

All you need to do is: just generate a migration using the following command:

rails g migration AddUserToUploads user:references

Which will create a migration file as:

class AddUserToUploads < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    add_reference :uploads, :user, index: true
  end
end

Then, run the migration using rake db:migrate. This migration will take care of adding a new column named user_id to uploads table (referencing id column in users table), PLUS it will also add an index on the new column.

UPDATE [For Rails 4.2]

Rails can’t be trusted to maintain referential integrity; relational databases come to our rescue here. What that means is that we can add foreign key constraints at the database level itself and ensure that database would reject any operation that violates this set referential integrity. As @infoget commented, Rails 4.2 ships with native support for foreign keys(referential integrity). It's not required but you might want to add foreign key(as it's very useful) to the reference that we created above.

To add foreign key to an existing reference, create a new migration to add a foreign key:

class AddForeignKeyToUploads < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    add_foreign_key :uploads, :users
  end
end

To create a completely brand new reference with a foreign key(in Rails 4.2), generate a migration using the following command:

rails g migration AddUserToUploads user:references

which will create a migration file as:

class AddUserToUploads < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    add_reference :uploads, :user, index: true
    add_foreign_key :uploads, :users
  end
end

This will add a new foreign key to the user_id column of the uploads table. The key references the id column in users table.

NOTE: This is in addition to adding a reference so you still need to create a reference first then foreign key (you can choose to create a foreign key in the same migration or a separate migration file). Active Record only supports single column foreign keys and currently only mysql, mysql2 and PostgreSQL adapters are supported. Don't try this with other adapters like sqlite3, etc. Refer to Rails Guides: Foreign Keys for your reference.

  • 7
    In many cases it's good to add foreign key as well. add_foreign_key (Rails 4.2) – poerror Mar 12 '15 at 11:11
  • 17
    I believe you can do all in one line: add_reference :uploads, :user, index: true, foreign_key: true @KirtiThorat – user1801879 Jun 7 '15 at 5:13
  • 29
    Now, if you use the special generator syntax for migrations, Rails 4.2 will automatically create the correct migration with foreign key constraints included. rails g migration AddUserToUploads user:references produces add_reference :uploads, :user, index: true, foreign_key: true in the appropriate migration. – jrhorn424 Jul 27 '15 at 22:49
  • 8
    Use ...index: true, foreign_key: true instead o line add_foreign_key. – Washington Botelho Dec 27 '15 at 1:01
  • 2
    Why do we need both foreign_key and t.reference? Isn't t.reference essentially equivalent to foriegn_key + index? – geoboy Sep 14 '17 at 20:24
162

Rails 5

You can still use this command to create the migration:

rails g migration AddUserToUploads user:references

The migration looks a bit different to before, but still works:

class AddUserToUploads < ActiveRecord::Migration[5.0]
  def change
    add_reference :uploads, :user, foreign_key: true
  end
end

Note that it's :user, not :user_id

  • 2
    For name-spaced classes, like Local::User instead of User do something like rails g migration AddLocalUserToUploads user:references. – Ka Mok Sep 22 '16 at 22:31
  • 3
    does this automatically add :index – Saravanabalagi Ramachandran Oct 1 '16 at 3:15
  • 4
    @Zeke Yes, run the migration and check your schema, it should say something like t.index ["user_id"], name: "index_uploads_on_user_id", using: :btree – Mirror318 Oct 2 '16 at 23:40
  • 1
    yeah, i got an "index exists" error when i manually added the add_index in migration :P @Mirror318 – Saravanabalagi Ramachandran Oct 3 '16 at 5:27
  • 2
    We should also add belongs_to :user in Upload class, so we can use upload.user to get the user instance. – Wit Jun 19 '17 at 10:49
12

if you like another alternate approach with up and down method try this:

  def up
    change_table :uploads do |t|
      t.references :user, index: true
    end
  end

  def down
    change_table :uploads do |t|
      t.remove_references :user, index: true
    end
  end
8

[Using Rails 5]

Generate migration:

rails generate migration add_user_reference_to_uploads user:references

This will create the migration file:

class AddUserReferenceToUploads < ActiveRecord::Migration[5.1]
  def change
    add_reference :uploads, :user, foreign_key: true
  end
end

Now if you observe the schema file, you will see that the uploads table contains a new field. Something like: t.bigint "user_id" or t.integer "user_id".

Migrate database:

rails db:migrate
  • This answer seems to be duplicate of @Mirror318's answer. Please comment on above answer if you think something is missing from it. Thanks. – M. Habib Feb 9 '18 at 14:02
6

Another syntax of doing the same thing is:

rails g migration AddUserToUpload user:belongs_to
3

Just to document if someone has the same problem...

In my situation I've been using :uuid fields, and the above answers does not work to my case, because rails 5 are creating a column using :bigint instead :uuid:

add_column :uploads, :user_id, :uuid
add_index :uploads, :user_id
add_foreign_key :uploads, :users
  • It's also a lot clearer what's happening. But yeah UUID should be standard now. – hadees Mar 2 at 6:41

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