68

How can I get the IPv4 address of an interface on Linux from C code?

For example, I'd like to get the IP address (if any) assigned to eth0.

85

Try this:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <string.h> /* for strncpy */

#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <sys/ioctl.h>
#include <netinet/in.h>
#include <net/if.h>
#include <arpa/inet.h>

int
main()
{
 int fd;
 struct ifreq ifr;

 fd = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_DGRAM, 0);

 /* I want to get an IPv4 IP address */
 ifr.ifr_addr.sa_family = AF_INET;

 /* I want IP address attached to "eth0" */
 strncpy(ifr.ifr_name, "eth0", IFNAMSIZ-1);

 ioctl(fd, SIOCGIFADDR, &ifr);

 close(fd);

 /* display result */
 printf("%s\n", inet_ntoa(((struct sockaddr_in *)&ifr.ifr_addr)->sin_addr));

 return 0;
}

The code sample is taken from here.

7
  • 2
    why there is a segmentation fault? – user138126 Mar 26 '13 at 11:13
  • 8
    If you change SIOCGIFADDR to SIOCGIFNETMASK, you can get the interface's netmask. – Craig McQueen Apr 4 '14 at 2:23
  • 5
    It's worth checking the return value of ioctl(), and if it's non-zero, check the value of errno. – Craig McQueen Apr 4 '14 at 2:49
  • No need for IFNAMSIZ-1, instead just IFNAMSIZ will suffice. strncpy will use the last byte to terminate the string incase of overflow. – zapstar Nov 16 '16 at 9:01
  • 4
    @zapstar I don't think that's correct. From the strncpy manpage: Warning: If there is no null byte among the first n bytes of src, the string placed in dest will not be null-terminated. – Mark Smith Apr 4 '17 at 10:15
43

In addition to the ioctl() method Filip demonstrated you can use getifaddrs(). There is an example program at the bottom of the man page.

3
  • 1
    getifaddrs seems very comprehensive. Other methods will only give the primary or first address per interface. – MarkR Feb 17 '10 at 22:00
  • 1
    Oh awesome, never knew about this! – Matt Joiner Jul 7 '10 at 9:55
  • 1
    I don't have any connection on eth0, if I use the other method it outputs 128.226.115.183 which is wrong. However, this method shows that there is no connection on eth0 which provides a reliable output – Angs Jul 14 '13 at 10:47
25

If you're looking for an address (IPv4) of the specific interface say wlan0 then try this code which uses getifaddrs():

#include <arpa/inet.h>
#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <netdb.h>
#include <ifaddrs.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <string.h>
int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    struct ifaddrs *ifaddr, *ifa;
    int family, s;
    char host[NI_MAXHOST];

    if (getifaddrs(&ifaddr) == -1) 
    {
        perror("getifaddrs");
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    }


    for (ifa = ifaddr; ifa != NULL; ifa = ifa->ifa_next) 
    {
        if (ifa->ifa_addr == NULL)
            continue;  

        s=getnameinfo(ifa->ifa_addr,sizeof(struct sockaddr_in),host, NI_MAXHOST, NULL, 0, NI_NUMERICHOST);

        if((strcmp(ifa->ifa_name,"wlan0")==0)&&(ifa->ifa_addr->sa_family==AF_INET))
        {
            if (s != 0)
            {
                printf("getnameinfo() failed: %s\n", gai_strerror(s));
                exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
            }
            printf("\tInterface : <%s>\n",ifa->ifa_name );
            printf("\t  Address : <%s>\n", host); 
        }
    }

    freeifaddrs(ifaddr);
    exit(EXIT_SUCCESS);
}

You can replace wlan0 with eth0 for ethernet and lo for local loopback.

The structure and detailed explanations of the data structures used could be found here.

To know more about linked list in C this page will be a good starting point.

3
  • why we need getnameinfo? – abhiarora Jul 14 '20 at 15:00
  • @abhiarora From the doc - it converts a socket address to a corresponding host and service, in a protocol-independent manner. Note that the value of the host parameter printed later is supplied inside the getnameinfo function. – sjsam Jul 14 '20 at 17:58
  • Why ifa->ifa_addr == NULL is not enough? I am not sure why we need getnameinfo as ifa_addr is internal address. – abhiarora Jul 15 '20 at 4:08
3

My 2 cents: the same code works even if iOS:

#include <arpa/inet.h>
#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <netdb.h>
#include <ifaddrs.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <string.h>



#import "ViewController.h"

@interface ViewController ()

@end

@implementation ViewController

- (void)viewDidLoad {
    [super viewDidLoad];
    // Do any additional setup after loading the view, typically from a nib.
    showIP();
}



void showIP()
{
    struct ifaddrs *ifaddr, *ifa;
    int family, s;
    char host[NI_MAXHOST];

    if (getifaddrs(&ifaddr) == -1)
    {
        perror("getifaddrs");
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    }


    for (ifa = ifaddr; ifa != NULL; ifa = ifa->ifa_next)
    {
        if (ifa->ifa_addr == NULL)
            continue;

        s=getnameinfo(ifa->ifa_addr,sizeof(struct sockaddr_in),host, NI_MAXHOST, NULL, 0, NI_NUMERICHOST);

        if( /*(strcmp(ifa->ifa_name,"wlan0")==0)&&( */ ifa->ifa_addr->sa_family==AF_INET) // )
        {
            if (s != 0)
            {
                printf("getnameinfo() failed: %s\n", gai_strerror(s));
                exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
            }
            printf("\tInterface : <%s>\n",ifa->ifa_name );
            printf("\t  Address : <%s>\n", host);
        }
    }

    freeifaddrs(ifaddr);
}


@end

I simply removed the test against wlan0 to see data. ps You can remove "family"

1
2

If you don't mind the binary size, you can use iproute2 as library.

iproute2-as-lib

Pros:

  • No need to write the socket layer code.
  • More or even more information about network interfaces can be got. Same functionality with the iproute2 tools.
  • Simple API interface.

Cons:

  • iproute2-as-lib library size is big. ~500kb.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.