-1

In C, we are able to take input as character with the keyword char from keyboard as

scanf("%c", &ch);

But In Java how to do this?

I have tried this:

import java.util.Scanner;

public class Main {
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    Scanner scanner = new Scanner(System.in);
    System.out.println("Enter a character: ");
    char c = scanner.next().charAt(0);
    System.out.println("You have entered: "+c);
  }
}
  • Have you tried anything? Does it work? – user1907906 Apr 3 '14 at 12:15
  • Yah, I've tried. Here is one of the example: import java.util.Scanner; public class Main { public static void main(String[] args) { Scanner scanner = new Scanner(System.in); System.out.println("Enter a character: "); char c = scanner.next().charAt(0); System.out.println("You have entered: "+c); } } – Shahiduzzaman Shahid Apr 4 '14 at 11:31
0

use the System class

char yourChar = System.in.read()
  • Don't forget to cast the result. Also, it'd be better to check for -1 (end of stream). – Danstahr Apr 3 '14 at 12:17
  • Again, this only works properly for characters that can be represented by a single byte. Chuck a multi-byte character at it, such as "", and this no longer gives the correct output. – JonK Apr 3 '14 at 13:04
5

you can use a Scanner to read from input :

Scanner scanner = new Scanner(System.in); 
char c = scanner.next().charAt(0); //charAt() method returns the character at the specified index in a string. The index of the first character is 0, the second character is 1, and so on.
1

You can simply use (char) System.in.read(); casting to char is necessary to convert int to char

  • This only works for characters that can be represented by an int value less than 256. Try it with the character "" and see what happens. Any character that requires more than one byte to represent will not be read properly using this method. – JonK Apr 3 '14 at 12:58
0

Here is the sample program.

import java.io.BufferedReader;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.InputStreamReader;

public class ReadFromConsole {

  public static void main(String[] args) {

    System.out.println("Enter here : ");

    try{
        BufferedReader bufferRead = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));

        String value = bufferRead.readLine();

        System.out.println(value);
    }
    catch(IOException e)
    {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
  }
}

You can get it easily when you search in Internet. StackExchange recommends to do some research and put some effort before reaching it.

  • At first I have searched But didn't get the exact answer. That's why I've asked this question. Thanks to all for nice replay. – Shahiduzzaman Shahid Apr 3 '14 at 12:32
  • Good. If you find any answer that helped you most, you can choose that as best answer & upvote the answers you liked most. – svjn Apr 3 '14 at 12:34
  • I'm using this website since long time but signed up in this site yesterday. That's why I've not the right to upvote any answer right now. While click the button to upvote "Vote Up requires 15 reputation" this message is shown. What can I do to increase my reputation in this website? – Shahiduzzaman Shahid Apr 4 '14 at 10:20
  • You might not be able to upvote at this time, but can choose the correct answer by clicking the tick mark next to the answer. And to improve reputation, this link will help you understand. stackoverflow.com/help/whats-reputation – svjn Apr 4 '14 at 10:24
0

using java you can do this:

Using the Scanner:

Scanner reader = new Scanner(System.in);
String line = reader.nextLine();
// now you can use some converter to change the String value to the value you need.
// for example Long.parseLong(line) or Integer.parseInt(line) or other type cast

Using the BufferedReader:

BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));
String line = reader.readLine();
// now you can use some converter to change the String value to the value you need.
// for example Long.parseLong(line) or Integer.parseInt(line) or other type cast

In the two cases you need to pass you Default input, in my case System.in

  • I knew this system to take String as input. It seems to me taking input a character and a String is different things. By the way thank you for your replay. – Shahiduzzaman Shahid Apr 4 '14 at 11:41
0

use :

char ch=**scanner.nextChar**()
0

I had the same struggle and I this is what I used:

} public static void main(String[] args) {

Scanner scan = new Scanner(System.in);
System.out.print("Please enter the string: ");
String input = scan.next();
System.out.print("Please enter the required symbol: ");
String symbol = scan.next();        
char symbolChar = symbol.charAt(0);

This works just fine. The idea is to get from the string the only char in it.

0
import java.util.Scanner;

class SwiCas {

    public static void main(String as[]) {   
        Scanner s= new Scanner(System.in);

        char a=s.next().charAt(0);//this line shows how to take character input in java

        switch(a) {    
            case 'a':
                System.out.println("Vowel....");   
                break;    
            case 'e':
                System.out.println("Vowel....");   
                break;   
            case 'i':
                System.out.println("Vowel....");   
                break;
            case 'o':
                System.out.println("Vowel....");    
                break;    
            case 'u':
                System.out.println("Vowel....");   
                break;    
            case 'A':
                System.out.println("Vowel....");    
                break;    
            case 'E':
                System.out.println("Vowel....");  
                break;    
            case 'I':
                System.out.println("Vowel....");    
                break;    
            case 'O':
                System.out.println("Vowel....");    
                break;   
            case 'U':
                System.out.println("Vowel....");    
                break;    
            default:    
                System.out.println("Consonants....");
        }
    }
}
  • While this code may answer the question, providing information on how and why it solves the problem improves its long-term value – L_J Sep 2 '18 at 11:07
0
import java.util.Scanner;

class CheckVowel {

    public static void main(String args[]) {   
        Scanner obj= new Scanner(System.in);

        char a=obj.next().charAt(0);

        switch(a) {    
            case 'a':  //cases can be used together for the same statement
            case 'e':
            case 'i':
            case 'o':
            case 'u':
            case 'A':
            case 'E':
            case 'I':     
            case 'O':
            case 'U':
                     {
                System.out.println("Vowel....");   
                break;
               }    
            default:    
                System.out.println("Consonants....");
        }
    }
}

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