47

Am quite new to Laravel and I have to create a form for create and a form for edit. In my form I have quite some jquery ajax posts. Am wondering whether Laravel does provide for an easy way for me to use the same form for my edit and create without having to add tons of logic in my code. I don't want to check if am in edit or create mode every time when assigning values to fields when the form loads. Any ideas on how I can accomplish this with minimum coding?

  • I wouldn't go that way, separate responsabilities and setup form and controller methods for creation and edition. Laravel offers nice and easy ways to populate the form fields for you – Jarek Tkaczyk Apr 3 '14 at 16:51
  • Check out the documentation about using [Forms and HTML][laravel.com/docs/html], especially the "Opening a new model form" – Tim Groeneveld Apr 3 '14 at 16:52
  • 1
    Additionally, check out this stackoverflow question stackoverflow.com/questions/17510355/… – Tim Groeneveld Apr 3 '14 at 16:57

11 Answers 11

59

I like like to use form model binding so I can easily populate a form's fields with corresponding value, so I follow this approach (using a user model for example):

@if(isset($user))
    {{ Form::model($user, ['route' => ['updateroute', $user->id], 'method' => 'patch']) }}
@else
    {{ Form::open(['route' => 'createroute']) }}
@endif

    {{ Form::text('fieldname1', Input::old('fieldname1')) }}
    {{ Form::text('fieldname2', Input::old('fieldname2')) }}
    {{-- More fields... --}}
    {{ Form::submit('Save', ['name' => 'submit']) }}
{{ Form::close() }}

So, for example, from a controller, I basically use the same form for creating and updating, like:

// To create a new user
public function create()
{
    // Load user/createOrUpdate.blade.php view
    return View::make('user.createOrUpdate');
}

// To update an existing user (load to edit)
public function edit($id)
{
    $user = User::find($id);
    // Load user/createOrUpdate.blade.php view
    return View::make('user.createOrUpdate')->with('user', $user);
}
  • 2
    Helpful. I must read more on form model binding – Kevin Joymungol Apr 3 '14 at 17:31
  • 3
    This is a nice way to do more while writing less and most of the admin controllers of mine uses this approach with resource/Restful controllers:-) – The Alpha Apr 3 '14 at 17:33
  • 1
    You can also take an approach of splitting the form up into partials - smaller views of the complete form or parts of the form. You can then have two wrappers - one for creation and one for updating, and each can pull in the form partials they need. Depending how complex your use-case is, and whether the creation vs update forms should be absolutely identical or not to end users, this may be more manageable then squeezing it all into one view with multiple conditional sections. – Jason Sep 4 '15 at 17:00
  • 3
    It's no longer part of Laravel core. – Lee Jul 17 '17 at 12:29
  • 1
    @Lee, I'm aware of it. Check the date of this answer. It was answered long ago and was valid so... – The Alpha Jul 17 '17 at 14:20
25

Pretty easy in your controller you do:

public function create()
{
    $user = new User;

    $action = URL::route('user.store');

    return View::('viewname')->with(compact('user', 'action'));
}

public function edit($id)
{
    $user = User::find($id);

    $action = URL::route('user.update', ['id' => $id]);

    return View::('viewname')->with(compact('user', 'action'));
}

And you just have to use this way:

{{ Form::model($user, ['action' => $action]) }}

   {{ Form::input('email') }}
   {{ Form::input('first_name') }}

{{ Form::close() }}
  • Thanks Antonio. Just if you can help, what does the second part of your code, where its doing Form::model, Form::input and Form::close() do? – Kevin Joymungol Apr 3 '14 at 17:19
  • 2
    How do you deal for using POST or PATCH method depending on create or update ? – Samuel De Backer Apr 3 '14 at 19:23
  • form:model will not work since you are not using PATCH or PUT! – dynamic May 16 '15 at 11:48
  • How can it be replaced with patch? – Reshad May 24 '15 at 21:39
  • I had a problem with this code, it took me several minutes to find out I should use 'url' instead of 'action'. Like this: {{ Form::model($user, ['url' => $action]) }} Hope this help others. – Farhad Apr 1 '16 at 11:11
13

Another clean method with a small controller, two views and a partial view :

UsersController.php

public function create()
{
    return View::('create');
}    

public function edit($id)
{
    $user = User::find($id);
    return View::('edit')->with(compact('user'));
}

create.blade.php

{{ Form::open( array( 'route' => ['users.index'], 'role' => 'form' ) ) }}
    @include('_fields')
{{ Form::close() }}

edit.blade.php

{{ Form::model( $user, ['route' => ['users.update', $user->id], 'method' => 'put', 'role' => 'form'] ) }}
    @include('_fields')
{{ Form::close() }}

_fields.blade.php

{{ Form::text('fieldname1') }}
{{ Form::text('fieldname2') }}
{{ Form::button('Save', ['type' => 'submit']) }}
  • How do you handle prepopulating the form fields with either saved content (if editing) or submitted content (if validation fails)? – jcorry Jun 17 '14 at 19:01
  • It's automatic. On create/update failed : repopulating is done with Input array. On get /edit : data are taken from model thanks to Form::model() – Samuel De Backer Jun 18 '14 at 11:00
  • 3
    I think this is actually the cleanest/best answer given. – Alex Coleman Sep 9 '14 at 13:44
  • But how do you actually save all of the edited fields to the object? All I see you doing in your example is in the controller you are finding the object and then creating the new view? What about where you actually save the edits? @SamuelDeBacker – Marcel Mar 22 '15 at 2:09
  • 1
    @Max the edits are saved on the update Method. Something like $return = DB::transaction(function($id) use ($id) { $input = Input::all(); $user = User::find($id); $user->name = $input['name']; return $user->save(); }); then you can if($return){ return Redirect::to('user'); } else { return Redirect::back()->withInput(); } – Michel Ayres Mar 30 '15 at 12:35
3

Simple and clean :)

UserController.php

public function create() {
    $user = new User();

    return View::make('user.edit', compact('user'));
}

public function edit($id) {
    $user = User::find($id);

    return View::make('user.edit', compact('user'));
}

edit.blade.php

{{ Form::model($user, ['url' => ['/user', $user->id]]) }}
   {{ Form::text('name') }}
   <button>save</button>
{{ Form::close() }}
  • Clean code. But what if user cancels the sign up or refreshes the sign up page several times or restarts the browser(ie, destroying the session)? There will be lots of vague/incomplete entries in the table – Fallen Jun 23 '15 at 13:51
  • $user = new User(); - it doesnt execute sql query. New entry is added into sql only in your UPDATE or STORE method. – Mantas D Jun 26 '15 at 6:13
2

Instead of creating two methods - one for creating new row and one for updating, you should use findOrNew() method. So:

public function edit(Request $request, $id = 0)
{
    $user = User::findOrNew($id);
    $user->fill($request->all());
    $user->save();
}
2

For the creation add an empty object to the view.

return view('admin.profiles.create', ['profile' => new Profile()]);

Old function has a second parameter, default value, if you pass there the object's field, the input can be reused.

<input class="input" type="text" name="name" value="{{old('name', $profile->name)}}">

For the form action, you can use the correct endpoint.

<form action="{{ $profile->id == null ? '/admin/profiles' :  '/admin/profiles/' . $profile->id }} " method="POST">

And for the update you have to use PATCH method.

@isset($profile->id)
 {{ method_field('PATCH')}}
@endisset
  • 1
    Instead of $profile->id you can use $profile->exists, in that way is Model agnostic ;) – Ciberman Apr 13 at 22:06
1

In Rails, it has form_for helper, so we could make a function like form_for.

We can make a Form macro, for example in resource/macro/html.php:

(if you don't know how to setup a macro, you can google "laravel 5 Macro")

Form::macro('start', function($record, $resource, $options = array()){
    if ((null === $record || !$record->exists()) ? 1 : 0) {
        $options['route'] = $resource .'.store';
        $options['method'] = 'POST';
        $str = Form::open($options);
    } else {
        $options['route'] = [$resource .'.update', $record->id];
        $options['method'] = 'PUT';
        $str = Form::model($record, $options);
    }
    return $str;
});

The Controller:

public function create()
{
    $category = null;
    return view('admin.category.create', compact('category'));
}

public function edit($id)
{
    $category = Category.find($id);
    return view('admin.category.edit', compact('category'));
}

Then in the view _form.blade.php:

{!! Form::start($category, 'admin.categories', ['class' => 'definewidth m20']) !!}
// here the Form fields
{{!! Form::close() !!}}

Then view create.blade.php:

@include '_form'

Then view edit.blade.php:

@include '_form'
1
    Article is a model containing two fields - title and content 
    Create a view as pages/add-update-article.blade.php   

        @if(!isset($article->id))
            <form method = "post" action="add-new-article-record">
            @else
             <form method = "post" action="update-article-record">
            @endif
                {{ csrf_field() }} 

                <div class="form-group">
                    <label for="title">Title</label>            
                    <input type="text" class="form-control" id="title" placeholder="Enter title" name="title" value={{$article->title}}>
                    <span class="text-danger">{{ $errors->first('title') }}</span>
                </div>
                <div class="form-group">
                    <label for="content">Content</label>
                    <textarea class="form-control" rows="5" id="content" name="content">
                    {{$article->content}}

                    </textarea>
                    <span class="text-danger">{{ $errors->first('content') }}</span>
                </div>
                <input type="hidden" name="id" value="{{{ $article->id }}}"> 
                <button type="submit" class="btn btn-default">Submit</button>
            </form>

Route(web.php): Create routes to controller 

        Route::get('/add-new-article', 'ArticlesController@new_article_form');
        Route::post('/add-new-article-record', 'ArticlesController@add_new_article');
        Route::get('/edit-article/{id}', 'ArticlesController@edit_article_form');
        Route::post('/update-article-record', 'ArticlesController@update_article_record');

Create ArticleController.php
       public function new_article_form(Request $request)
    {
        $article = new Articles();
        return view('pages/add-update-article', $article)->with('article', $article);
    }

    public function add_new_article(Request $request)
    {
        $this->validate($request, ['title' => 'required', 'content' => 'required']);
        Articles::create($request->all());
        return redirect('articles');
    }

    public function edit_article_form($id)
    {
        $article = Articles::find($id);
        return view('pages/add-update-article', $article)->with('article', $article);
    }

    public function update_article_record(Request $request)
    {
        $this->validate($request, ['title' => 'required', 'content' => 'required']);
        $article = Articles::find($request->id);
        $article->title = $request->title;
        $article->content = $request->content;
        $article->save();
        return redirect('articles');
    } 
  • 1
    You could do with adding some text to this to explain how it relates to the original Q. – d219 Mar 29 '18 at 15:30
1

You can use form binding and 3 methods in your Controller. Here's what I do

class ActivitiesController extends BaseController {
    public function getAdd() {
        return $this->form();
    }
    public function getEdit($id) {
        return $this->form($id);
    }
    protected function form($id = null) {
        $activity = ! is_null($id) ? Activity::findOrFail($id) : new Activity;

        //
        // Your logic here
        //

        $form = View::make('path.to.form')
            ->with('activity', $activity);

        return $form->render(); 
    }
}

And in my views I have

{{ Form::model($activity, array('url' => "/admin/activities/form/{$activity->id}", 'method' => 'post')) }}
{{ Form::close() }}
0

UserController.php

use View;

public function create()
{
    return View::make('user.manage', compact('user'));
}

public function edit($id)
{
    $user = User::find($id);
    return View::make('user.manage', compact('user'));
}

user.blade.php

@if(isset($user))
    {{ Form::model($user, ['route' => ['user.update', $user->id], 'method' => 'PUT']) }}
@else
    {{ Form::open(['route' => 'user.store', 'method' => 'POST']) }}
@endif

// fields

{{ Form::close() }}
0

For example, your controller, retrive data and put the view

class ClassExampleController extends Controller
{

    public function index()
    {   

        $test = Test::first(1);

        return view('view-form',[
            'field' => $test,
        ]);
    }
}

Add default value in the same form, create and edit, is very simple

<!-- view-form file -->
<form action="{{ 
    isset($field) ? 
    @route('field.updated', $field->id) : 
    @route('field.store')
}}">
    <!-- Input case -->
    <input name="name_input" class="form-control" 
    value="{{ isset($field->name) ? $field->name : '' }}">
</form>

And, you remember add csrf_field, in case a POST method requesting. Therefore, repeat input, and select element, compare each option

<select name="x_select">
@foreach($field as $subfield)

    @if ($subfield == $field->name)
        <option val="i" checked>
    @else
        <option val="i" >
    @endif

@endforeach
</select>

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