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Following is my code for converting infix to postfix notation and later postfix is also being evaluated. This code works fine and gives right answer but in the end I am getting this error on run time.

Why this error is being caused? I am using Viusal C++ 2010.

enter image description here

Code:

#include<iostream>
#include<stack>
#include<string.h>

using namespace std;


int getPrecedence( char tmp )
{
    if(tmp=='+')
    {
        return 1;
    }
    else if(tmp == '-')
    {
        return 1;
    }
    else if(tmp == '*')
    {
        return 2;
    }
    else if(tmp == '/')
    {
        return 2;
    }
    else if(tmp == '=')
    {
        return 0;
    }
    else if(tmp == '(')
    {
        return -1;
    }
    else if(tmp == ')')
    {
        return -1;
    }
}

int main()
{

    stack<char> st;

    char expression[10];

    cout<<"Enter expression : ";
    //cin>>expression;
    strcpy(expression,"x=(0+1)+(y=2+3)");
    char postfix[100];  // its postfix string
    int counter=0;

    int i=0;

    int bracketCheck = 0;

    //(a+b)
    while( expression[i] != '\0' )  // iterate till '/0' does not come.
    {
        if(expression[i]== '+' || expression[i]== '-' || expression[i]== '*' || expression[i]== '/' || expression[i]== '='  )
        {
            if( st.empty() )
            {
                st.push(expression[i]);
            }
            else // when stack not empty
            {
                int topPrecedence = getPrecedence( st.top() );
                int expressionPrecedence = getPrecedence( expression[i] );


                while( !(topPrecedence < expressionPrecedence) )
                {
                    postfix[counter++] = st.top();
                    st.pop() ;

                    if(! st.empty() )
                    {
                        topPrecedence = getPrecedence( st.top() );
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        break;
                    }


                }

                //if( st.empty() )
                //{
                //  st.push( expression[i] );
                //}

                if( topPrecedence < expressionPrecedence )
                {
                    st.push( expression[i] );
                }


            }
        }
        else if( expression[i]=='(' )
        {
            st.push( expression[i] );
            bracketCheck++;
        }
        else if( expression[i]==')' )
        {
            int topPrecedence = getPrecedence( st.top() );
            int expressionPrecedence = getPrecedence( expression[i] );

            while( topPrecedence >= expressionPrecedence)   // +>=) --- 1 >= -1 ------- +>=) --- -1 >= -1
            {

                if( getPrecedence( st.top() ) != -1 )
                {
                    postfix[counter++] = st.top();
                }
                char BracketFound = st.top();
                st.pop();
                if( !st.empty() )
                    topPrecedence = getPrecedence( st.top() );
                if( st.empty() )   // break out of loop when stack is empty
                    break;
                if( BracketFound == '(' )
                    break;

            }

        }
        else // when its an alphabet 
        {
            postfix[counter++] = expression[i];
        }


        i++;
    } // outer while ends 

    while( ! st.empty() )
    {
        postfix[counter++] = st.top();
        st.pop();
    }


    postfix[counter] = '\0';
    i=0;

    while( postfix[i] != '\0' )
    {
        cout<<postfix[i]<<" ";
        i++;
    }

    stack<char> e; // eval stands for evaluation
    i=0;

    while( postfix[i] != '\0' )
    {
        if( postfix[i] == '+' )
        {
            int right = e.top();
            right = right - 48;  // 48 is ascii of 0 so 49-48=1
            e.pop();

            int left = e.top();
            left = left - 48;
            e.pop();

            int result = left + right;
            result = result + 48;   // sets to right ascii and in next line this ascii is type casted to char.
            e.push( result );

        }
        else if( postfix[i] == '-' )
        {
            int right = e.top();
            right = right - 48;  // 48 is ascii of 0 so 49-48=1
            e.pop();

            int left = e.top();
            left = left - 48;
            e.pop();

            int result = left - right;
            result = result + 48;   // sets to right ascii and in next line this ascii is type casted to char.
            e.push( result );
        }
        else if( postfix[i] == '*' )
        {
            int right = e.top();
            right = right - 48;  // 48 is ascii of 0 so 49-48=1
            e.pop();

            int left = e.top();
            left = left - 48;
            e.pop();

            int result = left * right;
            result = result + 48;   // sets to right ascii and in next line this ascii is type casted to char.
            e.push( result );
        }
        else if( postfix[i] == '/' )
        {
            int right = e.top();
            right = right - 48;  // 48 is ascii of 0 so 49-48=1
            e.pop();

            int left = e.top();
            left = left - 48;
            e.pop();

            int result = left / right;
            result = result + 48;   // sets to right ascii and in next line this ascii is type casted to char.
            e.push( result );
        }
        else if( postfix[i] == '=' )
        {
            int right = e.top();
            //left = left - 48;  // 48 is ascii of 0 so 49-48=1
            e.pop();

            int left = e.top();
            //right = right - 48;
            e.pop();


            //int result = right + left;
            //result = result + 48;   // sets to right ascii and in next line this ascii is type casted to char.
            e.push( right );

        }
        else
            e.push( postfix[i] );
        i++;
    }

    // while ends

    cout<<endl;
    cout<<"result= "<<e.top()<<endl;





    system("pause");
    return 0;
}
  • 1
    "x=(0+1)+(y=2+3)" contains more than 10 chars. Before coming to SO, it's a good idea to read your code and note the blatantly obvious. And you should compile with high warning levels, to catch other fairly obvious things like not always returning a value from getPrecedence. – Jim Balter Apr 3 '14 at 19:47
  • 2
    Why didn't you just use std::string? Then you wouldn't have had these issues and post a question waiting for answers on SO. #include <string> //... std::string expression; expression="x=(0+1)+(y=2+3)"; – PaulMcKenzie Apr 3 '14 at 19:49
  • This code works fine and gives right answer and when you give that program to someone else to test on their machine, the program may crash. So the program isn't fine at all. When you overrun a buffer, anything can happen, including crash right away, or seem to work. – PaulMcKenzie Apr 3 '14 at 19:53
  • It's probably running because you're in a debug build; I'd wager it'll crash right away on release. Because it's a debug build, VS is allocating several bytes around your variable (these are called "canaries"), and you're overwriting those extra bytes (killing the canaries, so to speak). Without those "canary bytes" there, it's far more likely your program would instantly die due to access violations. – cf stands with Monica Apr 3 '14 at 19:56
  • @computerfreaker "would instantly die due to access violations." -- Not immediately. In most implementations, the tail of expression is written into the beginning of postfix, so when postfix is stored into it will clobber the tail of expression, which will make it look like random junk input ... lacking a NUL. postfix will probably grow indefinitely, eventually crashing the program. – Jim Balter Apr 3 '14 at 20:05
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Well, the first problem I see is that you are copying 15 characters + null terminator into expression[10]. Basically, you are stuffing 16 pounds into a 10-pound sack.

  • Thanks it worked. Can you explain what this error means and why was stack around 'expression' destroyed? What kind of stack is that? – user3461957 Apr 3 '14 at 19:50
  • By writing 16 bytes to expression, you were clobbering 6 bytes beyond the end of expression. We have all made these sorts of mistakes. @PaulMcKenzie (above) recommends using std::string to store text, and I heartily endorse this. Modern C++ code is moving away from arrays altogether and toward std::string, std::vector, and friends. You should look into this. – Steger Apr 3 '14 at 19:53
  • 2
    @user3461957 The runtime stack that local variables like expression are allocated from. This is a rather basic C/C++ concept. The error means what it obviously says ... you overwrote expression, thereby writing over other values on the stack. When compiling for debugging, Visual Studio kindly inserts checks for such mistakes. – Jim Balter Apr 3 '14 at 19:53
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char expression[10];

//<snip>

strcpy(expression,"x=(0+1)+(y=2+3)");

Look at the length of what you're copying into expression (don't forget the trailing \0). You've allocated 10 spaces in your array, but you're trying to store 16 in it, and you're overflowing your buffer.

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