16

I have a group of classes which are instantiated by reflection, hence these are not managed by the CDI container, and no injections are made by the context. My question is, is there any way to register these classes in the CDI context, so the classes get managed by the context?

Bellow, is how I create the classes:

String clazz = "org.myorg.thisIsMyClass";
MyClass myClass = Class.forName(clazz).newInstance(); // myClass instance not managed by CDI

How do I make the instance of myClass managed by the CDI container?

13

If your classes were registered as bean by the container you can use programmatic lookup to get them easily.

@Inject
@Any
Instance<Object> myBeans;

public Object getMyBeanFromClassName(String className) throws Exception{    
    Class clazz = Class.forName(className);
    return myBeans.select(clazz).get();  
}

Et voilà.

  • OK, I see. I tested this code and it works, it is far better than the previous you posted and the one I posted too. Thanks. +1 – Joe Almore Apr 8 '14 at 22:25
3

The easiest way to do let CDI to manage your class is to use a producer.

public class MyProducers {

  @Produces
  @RequestScoped //Could be any scope here
  @FromReflection //a qualifier to distinguish this Bean of type Object from others. Would be better to have a more specific bean type if all your class come from the same ancestor.
  public Object produceMyClass()
  {
    String clazz = "org.myorg.thisIsMyClass";
    Object myObject = Class.forName(clazz).newInstance();
    return myObject;
  }
}

Somewhere else in your code you can use this producer like this :

@Inject
@FromReflection
Object myBean;

** Edit : adding InjectionPoint usage. **

Now you can enhance your producer by injecting it's InjectionPointin its parameter list. You can then use the metadata of the injection point (i.e qualifier) to dynamically find your class.

First you have to add a field to store the class name in your @FromReflection qualifier :

@Qualifier
@Target({TYPE, METHOD, PARAMETER, FIELD})
@Retention(RUNTIME)
@Documented
public @interface FromReflection {

    @Nonbinding String value(); // classname will be store here 
}

then you use this info in your producer :

public class MyProducers {

  private String extractClassName(InjectionPoint ip) {
    for (Annotation annotation : ip.getQualifiers()) {
        if (annotation.annotationType().equals(FromReflection.class))
            return ((FromReflection) annotation).value();
    }
    throw new IllegalStateException("No @FromReflection on InjectionPoint");
  }

  @Produces
  @FromReflection
  public Object produceMyClass(InjectionPoint ip)
  {
    String clazzNanme = extractClassName(ip);
    Object myObject = Class.forName(clazz).newInstance();
    return myObject;
  }

}

Note that the produced bean has to be in @Dependent scope, it's a constraint when injecting InjectionPoint in the producer parameters. You can now inject your bean like that :

@Inject
@FromReflection("org.myorg.thisIsMyClass")
Object myBean;

Now if you want to decide at runtime which class you want to build, you'll have to use the CDI programmatic lookup feature which allow you to create synthetic qualifier. First create an AnnotationLiteral for your qualifier to be able to instantiate a a new qualifier.

public class FromReflectionLiteral extends AnnotationLiteral<FromReflection> implements FromReflection {

    private String value;

    public FromReflectionLiteral(String value) {
        this.value = value;
    }

    @Override
    public String value() {
        return value;
    }
}

Then you'll use the Instance<> bean to request for your final bean.

public class ConsumingBean {

    @Inject
    @Any
    Instance<Object> myBeanInstance;

    public Object getBeanFor(String className) {
     return myBeanInstance.select(new FromReflectionLiteral(className)).get();
    }
    ...
}

Next step would be to use a portable extension...

  • Your approach is interesting, even though as you may know, the name of the class isn't really a constant, I used a constant as illustration; The use of reflection is because the class to create is unknown, may be any class of a determined type, hence it is variable. So, how can your approach accept parameters into that @producer method? By creating another @producer? – Joe Almore Apr 5 '14 at 15:46
  • You can go farter by using InjectionPoint(I amended my answer to show you how), the drawback is that your produced bean have to be in @Dependent scope. You'll have to use a containing bean to give it a scope. There could be solution based on portable extension as well but I really need to know more about your use case. – Antoine Sabot-Durand Apr 6 '14 at 4:05
  • This is good code you have there, even though I finally ended up using another approach, yours is also valid, in fact it is not easy to find examples about AnnotationLiteral and dynamic parameters for producers, like the one you have. I posted my approach in an answer in this post, there you can see what I finally implemented. – Joe Almore Apr 7 '14 at 15:35
  • My code answer the original question. Yours doesn't. It only works if your classes were discovered by CDI container and registered as bean classes because CDI doesn't allow creating new bean at runtime. If your beans are effectively manage this code work but I can tell you that seeing this code made my CDI spec lead blood turn cold. It works but totally outside CDI spirit... – Antoine Sabot-Durand Apr 7 '14 at 21:09
  • Strictly speaking, yes, that is for already discovered classes by the CDI. The whole idea is to get an instance of a class managed by the CDI without using @Inject. Imagine you have 50 classes, and is at run time when you know what class to use, then there is no point in injecting all 50 classes to then use one. The fact that a class is discovered by the CDI does not guarantee you will get a managed instance, and it is far from trivial to get an instance managed by CDI without using @Inject. So, do not focus whether the classes are discovered or not, the issue is to get instance managed. – Joe Almore Apr 7 '14 at 21:32
3

Following the comments of @AdrianMitev, I finally ended up writing this class which returns an instance of a Managed CDI Bean given its class name (elName) or class type:

public class GetInstance {
    public static Object of(String elName) {
       BeanManager bm = getBeanManager();
       Bean<?> bean = bm.resolve(bm.getBeans(elName));
       return bm.getReference(bean, bean.getBeanClass(), bm.createCreationalContext(bean));
    }

    @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
    public static <T> T of(Class<T> clazz) {
        BeanManager bm = getBeanManager();
        Bean<?> bean = bm.resolve(bm.getBeans(clazz));
        return (T) bm.getReference(bean, bean.getBeanClass(), bm.createCreationalContext(bean));
    }

    private static BeanManager getBeanManager() {
        try {
            return (BeanManager) new InitialContext().lookup("java:comp/BeanManager");
        } catch (NamingException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        return null;
    }
}

So, if you have a class like this one:

@Named
public class FooClass {
...
}

You can get an a managed CDI instance using:

FooClass fC = GetInstance.of(FooClass.class);

or using its elName

FooClass fC = (FooClass) GetInstance.of("fooClass");

or you can select the name to use:

@Named(value="CustomFooClassName")
public class FooClass {
...
}

And using:

FooClass fC = (FooClass) GetInstance.of("CustomFooClassName");
  • 2
    Sorry to say, this solution is a compilation of bad practices :retrieving BeanManager from JNDI when you can inject it. Using bean manager directly when you have higher level tools like programmatic lookup, using slow EL resolution when you can request a bean from its type, doing a resolution on name when CDI is based on strong typing and provide name resolution only for UI. I posted a new answer doing the same in far less lines and using CDI good practices. – Antoine Sabot-Durand Apr 8 '14 at 6:20
  • 1
    Fine, you can spit all over my answer, but you forget the most important part it works. And no, you can not inject the BeanManager, if you have not noticed, the instance created of GetInstance to access the method of is not managed by the CDI, hence any injection in this class (GetInstance) will simply not be resolved. Regarding the EL, sometimes that is all the information you have available about a class you want to instantiate, it is not about whether I like to use EL or not. And as the class resolves the problem then it is good answer and good practice too. – Joe Almore Apr 8 '14 at 13:58
1

You can make CDI aware of your instance by not instantiating the bean yourself (as i pointed in your previous post) but to let CDI instantiate the bean. Here is a sample code for that:

InitialContext initialContext = new InitialContext();
BeanManager bm = (BeanManager) initialContext.lookup("java:comp/BeanManager");

//List all CDI Managed Beans and their EL-accessible name
Set<Bean<?>> beans = bm.getBeans(AbstractBean.class, new AnnotationLiteral<Any>() {});
List<Object> beanInstances = new ArrayList<Object>();

for (Bean bean : beans) {
    CreationalContext cc = bm.createCreationalContext(bean);
    //Instantiates bean if not already in-service (undesirable)
    Object beanInstance = bm.getReference(bean, bean.getBeanClass(), cc);
    beanInstances.add(beanInstance);
}

return beanInstances;

If you are sure that there is only one bean of the specific type you can use beans.iterator.next().

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