0

This is something very strange I have encountered which I have never seen before. I'm writing a stack ADT for a computer science project.

This is my situation:

When I try to test the copy constructor using a function(call-by value) I get a segfault when I run my program.

So I had a look at my code and looked for usual causes of segfaults (double deletion, pointer logic error, etc) and could find nothing.

So I tried commenting out the body of the copy (thats just the body, not the function prototype just the body) I still got the segfault.

So then I tried commenting out the copy constructor entirely (protype, function and all) and then no segfault (but of course that leaves me with the default constructor, which isn't good with pointers)

So that really confused me why would simply having a copy constructor at all, even if it did nothing cause a segfault?

I tried the same thing with the destructor, and found that after I commented it out completely (thats prototype and all) I found again that the code was working without segfaults (but of course that means without a destructor, which causes memory leaks!)

  //test.cpp - test program to test the copy constructor
    #include "stack.hpp"

    void test(STACK <int> x){
    }

    int main(void){
      STACK <int> a;
      a.push(1); a.push(2);
      test(a);
    }

//stack.hpp - ADT developed for project

//Stack.hpp -> developed for project 3
#include <cassert>
#include <new>
#include <iostream>

#ifndef STACK_HPP
#define STACK_HPP
const bool debug= false;


template<class T>
class NODE{

public:
  NODE(){next= 0;};
  T data;
  NODE *next;
};



template <class U>
class STACK{

public:
  STACK(){begin= 0;};

  bool empty()const{return begin == 0;};
  bool full()const;
  void push(U);
  U pop();
  void swap(STACK <U> &);

  ~STACK();
  STACK(const STACK <U> &);
  STACK <U> & operator=(const STACK <U> &);

private:
  NODE <U> *begin; 

};

template <class U>
bool STACK<U>::full()const{
  NODE <U> *test= new(std::nothrow) NODE <U>;

  if(test== 0){
    return true;
  }

  else{
    delete test;
    return false;
  }
}

//Requires not full
template <class U>
void STACK<U>::push(U x){
  assert(!full());

  if(empty()== true){
    begin= new NODE <U>;
  }

  else{
    NODE <U> *tmp= new NODE <U>;
    tmp->next= begin;
    begin= tmp;
  }

  begin->data= x;

}

//Requires not empty
template <class U>
U STACK<U>::pop(){
  assert(!empty());
  U result;

  if(begin->next == 0){
    result= begin->data;
    delete begin;
    begin= 0;
  }

  else{
    NODE <U> *tmp= begin->next;
    result= begin->data;
    delete begin;
    begin= tmp;
  }

  return result;
}

template <class U>
STACK<U>::~STACK(){
  if(debug)std::cout << "destroy";

  while(!empty())
    pop();

    }

template <class U>
STACK<U>::STACK(const STACK <U> & orig){
  if(debug)std::cout << "copy";

  if(!orig.empty()){
    NODE <U> *cur= orig.begin;
    STACK temp;

    while(cur!= 0){
      temp.push(cur->data);

      cur= cur->next;
    }

    cur= temp.begin;

    while(cur!= 0){
      push(cur->data);
      cur= cur->next;
    }

    }
    }

template <class U>
void STACK<U>::swap(STACK <U> & other){
  NODE <U> *tmp= begin;

  begin= other.begin;

  other.begin= tmp;
}

template <class U>
STACK<U>& STACK<U>::operator=(const STACK& rhs){
  STACK tmp(rhs);
  swap(tmp);
  return *this;
}

#endif
  • 2
    A debugger would show you exactly which line of code is faulting. Have you tried that? – Carey Gregory Apr 4 '14 at 1:12
2

The only problems I see:

  1. You are not initializing begin when orig is empty.

When I added the line:

begin = NULL;

right before the line

if(!orig.empty()){

the program ran without any errors on my machine.

  • That seems to have fixed it but I must ask you why? I have a default constructor stack(){begin= 0}; – HumbleWebDev Apr 4 '14 at 1:26
  • And thank you very much I've been bashing my head into the table over this for days now. – HumbleWebDev Apr 4 '14 at 1:27
  • 2
    @user3496058 The default ctor won't get called when the copy ctor is invoked. – zdan Apr 4 '14 at 1:31
  • Oh I didn't know that. Thanks man I'll keep that in mind. – HumbleWebDev Apr 4 '14 at 1:43
  • In C++11 you could use constructor delegation to let the copy contructor call the default constructor first to initialize defaults before then copying the source data. In C++99 and earlier, that is not an option, so the copy constructor has to duplicate what the default constructor does, which is usually done by moving that logic to a separate initialization method that both constructors then call. – Remy Lebeau Apr 4 '14 at 2:01

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.