14

I have come across a problem involving exclamation marks and integers whilst reading a code in my reference book.

Let us say I have declared an integer variable named number - int number = 0;

I then use a while function involving an exclamation mark and number

while(!number)
{
    ...
}

I am confused with this because I do not know what does !number mean and what would be possible returned results? I am not sure if this can be used, but as I said, I saw it in my book.

Therefore, it would be great if someone could tell me what does !number mean and what does it evaluate?

Thank you in advance.

  • 1
    Not. (True if number is zero, true otherwise.) As any C reference should have told you... – DevSolar Apr 4 '14 at 6:50
  • @DevSolar But I thought '!' can only be used for something like: while(number != 8) – Paul Filch Apr 4 '14 at 6:51
  • 1
    while(!Number) is equivalent to saying while(Number == 0) – Dayal rai Apr 4 '14 at 6:52
  • 1
    @DevSolar I've been trying online tutorials, with a reference book by my side just in case. I guess that like with everything else on the internet there is some false info on C programming – Paul Filch Apr 4 '14 at 6:56
  • 2
    @PaulFilch: The vast majority of "programming tutorials" I have seen online so far have been written by people who just had learned this stuff themselves, because experienced developers don't often sit down and write stuff for beginners -- unless they're trying to make money from it, e.g. by selling a book (or farming reputation on StackOverflow ;-) ). For every language there are "standard" publications that are the recommended reading on the subject. For C, that would be Kerninghan & Ritchie's "The C Programming Language". – DevSolar Apr 4 '14 at 7:20
13

We can treat ! as not. So if a number is non-zero (either positive or negative) it returns Zero. If it is zero, it returns 1.

int i = 13;
printf("i = %d, !i = %d\n", i, !i);
printf("!0 = %d\n", !(0));
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  • Thank you very much for the example as well, it made it clearer when I ran it. – Paul Filch Apr 4 '14 at 6:55
8

In C, !number will evaluate to 1 if number == 0 and to 0 if number != 0. And in C, 1 is true and 0 is false.

Using an explicit comparison like number == 0 have the same effect but you might find it easier to read.

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  • 4
    "Easier to read", I don't agree. Only when you know almost nothing about C. – Jens Gustedt Apr 4 '14 at 7:00
  • I guess "easier to read" is indeed subjective, so I'll change my phrase – TheWalkingCube Apr 4 '14 at 7:09
5

It's a negation or "not" operator. In practice !number means "true if number == 0, false otherwise." Google "unary operators" to learn more.

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  • So whenever I use it, does true always mean equal to 0? – Paul Filch Apr 4 '14 at 6:53
  • 1
    yes (!number) evaluates to true when number equal to 0, that's restating the same rule as above. – RobP Apr 4 '14 at 6:58
1

It is used for Negation of a number.It is a Unary Operator.

For Example:-

If we are using it with zero :- !0 then it will become 1

with one !1 = 0

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1

The negation operator (!) simply just reverses the meaning of its operand.

The operand or the expression must be of arithmetic or pointer type. But the operand/result of expression is implicitly converted to data type bool (boolean 0 means false, Non zero means True).

The result is true if the converted operand is false; the result is false if the converted operand is true. The result is of type bool.

so

while(!number)
{
    ...
}

since variable number is 0 , while(!number) ie, !0 which is 'negation of 0' which is 'TRUE' then it code enters the while loop()

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