38

Related to this answer,

If I truly do want to "Fire and Forget" a method that does return a task, and (for simplicity) let's assume that the method isn't expected to throw any exceptions. I can use the extension method listed in the answer:

public static void Forget(this Task task)
{
}

Using this approach, if there are bugs in action of the Task that cause an exception to be thrown then when the unexpected exception is thrown, the exception will be swallowed and go unnoticed.

Question: Wouldn't it be more appropriate in this scenario for the extension method to be of the form:

public static async void Forget(this Task task)
{
    await task;
}

So that programming errors throw an exception and get escalated (usually bringing down the process).

In the case of a method with expected (and ignorable) exceptions, the method would need to become more elaborate (as an aside, any suggestions on how to construct a version of this method that would take a list of acceptable and ignorable exception types?)

45

It depends on the semantics you want. If you want to ensure exceptions are noticed, then yes, you could await the task. But in that case it's not truly "fire and forget".

A true "fire and forget" - in the sense that you don't care about when it completes or whether it completes successfully or with error - is extremely rare.

Edit:

For handling exceptions:

public static async void Forget(this Task task, params Type[] acceptableExceptions)
{
  try
  {
    await task.ConfigureAwait(false);
  }
  catch (Exception ex)
  {
    // TODO: consider whether derived types are also acceptable.
    if (!acceptableExceptions.Contains(ex.GetType()))
      throw;
  }
}

Note that I recommend using await instead of ContinueWith. ContinueWith has a surprising default scheduler (as noted on my blog) and Task.Exception will wrap the actual exception in an AggregateException, making the error handling code more cumbersome.

  • 4
    So, how do I get the semantics of not caring when something finishes, but I do care about exceptions? Is it possible to have those semantics without async void at some level? – Matt Smith Apr 4 '14 at 13:57
  • 1
    Are you overthinking this or am I not getting it? It sounds like a try/catch is what you would need. Edited to show example code. – Stephen Cleary Apr 4 '14 at 14:50
  • 1
    @Noseratio and Stephen, Stephen your edit looks like exactly what I want. Thanks. And yes, as Noseratio, I'm planning on using this as a universal stub for fire-and-forget (except don't "forget"/swallow exceptions. – Matt Smith Apr 4 '14 at 15:35
  • 4
    The catch block will not run in the captured context (so any logging or whatever will not), but if the exception is not acceptable and is rethrown (throw;), then yes, the exception will be (re-)raised on the SynchronizationContext that was active at the beginning of Forget. – Stephen Cleary Apr 4 '14 at 16:36
  • 2
    It calls Post, actually. – Stephen Cleary Apr 5 '14 at 0:30
3

Yes if you were interested in whether or not the task threw an exception then you would need to await the result, but on the flipside, that pretty much defeats the purpose of "fire & forget".

In the scenario where you want to know if something bad happened then the recommended way of doing this is to use a continuation e.g.

public static void ForgetOrThrow(this Task task)
{
    task.ContinueWith((t) => {
        Console.WriteLine(t.Exception);
    }, TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnFaulted);
}
  • "if you make Forget an async method then you basically reintroduce the same issue"? What do you mean--it does suppress the warning and have the same behavior in the case of no exceptions thrown. I guess I want "Fire and Forget", except I don't want to ignore bugs. – Matt Smith Apr 4 '14 at 13:53
  • @MattSmith it suppresses the warning? The warning is due to the fact that externally there is no await call on WorkAsync() from inside an async method. The Forget extension method (which does nothing) suppresses the warning because it's a non-async method. Making it async again should be re-introducing the warning as you are back to calling an async method and not calling await (unless extension methods are treated differently...). – James Apr 4 '14 at 13:58
  • 2
    it is async void so there is nothing that can be awaited. – Matt Smith Apr 4 '14 at 13:59
  • @MattSmith ah, course. My mistake. – James Apr 4 '14 at 14:01
  • 1
    Albahari proposed this same idea in Chapter 23 of C# 5.0 In a Nutshell as a way to 'swallow' a task's unhandled exception, but noting that you could do something with the exception, such as logging it...so I would imagine it could be extensible to your idea of ignoring some and re-throwing others. Instead of just throw t.Exception you could 'observe' it first (var ignore = t.Exception; and if not an acceptable one, then throw it: if(reallyBad) {throw t.Exception;} This allows the acceptable ones to be simply swallowed. – mdisibio Apr 4 '14 at 14:48
3

In the linked question I initially wanted to use static void Forget(this Task task) in the following context:

var task = DoWorkAsync();
QueueAsync(task).Forget();

// ...

async Task QueueAsync(Task task)
{
    // keep failed/cancelled tasks in the list
    // they will be observed outside
    _pendingTasks.Add(task);
    await task;
    _pendingTasks.Remove(tasks)
}

It looked great, but then I realized that fatal exceptions possibly thrown by _pendingTasks.Add / _pendingTasks.Remove would be gone unobserved and lost, which is not good.

So I simply made QueueTask an async void method, what it essentially is:

var task = DoWorkAsync();
QueueAsync(task);

// ...

async void QueueAsync(Task task)
{
    // keep failed/cancelled tasks in the list
    // they will be observed outside
    _pendingTasks.Add(task);
    try
    {
        await task;
    }
    catch
    {
        return;
    }
    _pendingTasks.Remove(tasks)
}

As much as I don't like empty catch {}, I think it makes sense here.

In this scenario, keeping async Task QueueAsync() and using async void Forget(this Task task) like you propose would be on overkill, IMO.

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