146

In Python, when formatting string, I can fill placeholders by name rather than by position, like that:

print "There's an incorrect value '%(value)s' in column # %(column)d" % \
  { 'value': x, 'column': y }

I wonder if that is possible in Java (hopefully, without external libraries)?

15 Answers 15

128

StrSubstitutor of jakarta commons lang is a light weight way of doing this provided your values are already formatted correctly.

http://commons.apache.org/proper/commons-lang/javadocs/api-3.1/org/apache/commons/lang3/text/StrSubstitutor.html

Map<String, String> values = new HashMap<String, String>();
values.put("value", x);
values.put("column", y);
StrSubstitutor sub = new StrSubstitutor(values, "%(", ")");
String result = sub.replace("There's an incorrect value '%(value)' in column # %(column)");

The above results in:

"There's an incorrect value '1' in column # 2"

When using Maven you can add this dependency to your pom.xml:

<dependency>
    <groupId>org.apache.commons</groupId>
    <artifactId>commons-lang3</artifactId>
    <version>3.4</version>
</dependency>
  • 2
    I found it disappointing that the library doesn't throw if keys are not found, however, if you use the default syntax (${arg}) instead of the custom one above (%(arg)) then the regex will not compile, which is the desired effect. – John Lehmann Jun 30 '15 at 15:33
  • 2
    You can set a custom VariableResolver and throw an Exception if the key isn't present in the map. – Mene Apr 21 '16 at 14:21
  • 5
    Old thread, but as of 3.6, the text package was deprecated in favor of commons-text. commons.apache.org/proper/commons-text – Jeff Walker Dec 27 '17 at 21:33
62

not quite, but you can use MessageFormat to reference one value multiple times:

MessageFormat.format("There's an incorrect value \"{0}\" in column # {1}", x, y);

The above can be done with String.format() as well, but I find messageFormat syntax cleaner if you need to build complex expressions, plus you dont need to care about the type of the object you are putting into the string

  • 3
    Thanks, but the point is I cannot position parameters. – Andy Feb 18 '10 at 7:41
  • not sure why you can't, the position in the string is not important, only the position in the list of args, which makes it a renaming problem. You know the name of the keys, which means you can decide a position for a key in the list of arguments. from now on value will be known as 0 and column as 1: MessageeFormat.format("There's an incorrect value \"{0}\" in column # {1}, using {0} as value can cause many problems", valueMap.get('value'), valueMap.get('column')); – giladbu Feb 18 '10 at 8:17
  • 1
    Thanks for a clue, it helped me to write simple function that does exactly what I want (I've put it below). – Andy Feb 19 '10 at 8:52
  • 1
    Agreed, the syntax is much cleaner. Too bad MessageFormat has got a mind of its own when it comes to formatting numeric values. – Kees de Kooter Apr 26 '16 at 8:46
  • And it seems to ignore placeholders surrounded by single quotes. – Kees de Kooter Apr 26 '16 at 8:52
16

Another example of Apache Common StringSubstitutor for simple named placeholder.

String template = "Welcome to {theWorld}. My name is {myName}.";

Map<String, String> values = new HashMap<>();
values.put("theWorld", "Stackoverflow");
values.put("myName", "Thanos");

String message = StringSubstitutor.replace(template, values, "{", "}");

System.out.println(message);

// Welcome to Stackoverflow. My name is Thanos.
  • Thanks @Ninh Pham This works perfectly without much of work. – Martin Karari Dec 3 '18 at 6:46
  • If you expect to load very large files, I found this library also supports replaceIn which substitutes values into a buffer: StringBuilder, or TextStringBuilder. With this approach, the entire contents of the file won't be loaded into memory. – Edward Corrigall 2 days ago
15

You can use StringTemplate library, it offers what you want and much more.

import org.antlr.stringtemplate.*;

final StringTemplate hello = new StringTemplate("Hello, $name$");
hello.setAttribute("name", "World");
System.out.println(hello.toString());
  • Had trouble with the ' char: unexpected char: ''' – AlikElzin-kilaka Jan 18 '16 at 10:35
9

For very simple cases you can simply use a hardcoded String replace, no need for a library there:

    String url = "There's an incorrect value '%(value)' in column # %(column)";
    url = url.replace("%(value)", x); // 1
    url = url.replace("%(column)", y); // 2

WARNING: I just wanted to show the simplest code possible. Of course DO NOT use this for serious production code where security matters, as stated in the comments: escaping, error handling and security are an issue here. But in the worst case you now know why using a 'good' lib is required :-)

  • 1
    this one is simple and easy, but the downside is that it fails silently when the value wasn't found. It just leaves the placeholder in the original string. – kiedysktos Apr 27 '17 at 12:45
  • @kiedysktos, you could improve on it by doing a check, but if you do want the full thing, use a lib :) – Christophe Roussy Apr 27 '17 at 12:46
  • 2
    Warning: Because this technique treats intermediate substitution results as format strings of their own, this solution is vulnerable to format string attacks. Any correct solution should make one single pass through the format string. – 200_success May 15 '18 at 14:24
  • @200_success Yes good point talking about security, of course this code is not for serious production usage ... – Christophe Roussy May 15 '18 at 15:18
8

Thanks for all your help! Using all your clues, I've written routine to do exactly what I want -- python-like string formatting using dictionary. Since I'm Java newbie, any hints are appreciated.

public static String dictFormat(String format, Hashtable<String, Object> values) {
    StringBuilder convFormat = new StringBuilder(format);
    Enumeration<String> keys = values.keys();
    ArrayList valueList = new ArrayList();
    int currentPos = 1;
    while (keys.hasMoreElements()) {
        String key = keys.nextElement(),
        formatKey = "%(" + key + ")",
        formatPos = "%" + Integer.toString(currentPos) + "$";
        int index = -1;
        while ((index = convFormat.indexOf(formatKey, index)) != -1) {
            convFormat.replace(index, index + formatKey.length(), formatPos);
            index += formatPos.length();
        }
        valueList.add(values.get(key));
        ++currentPos;
    }
    return String.format(convFormat.toString(), valueList.toArray());
}
  • Unlike in Lombo's answer, this cannot get stuck in an infinite loop, since formatPos can't contain formatKey. – Aaron Dufour Jul 6 '12 at 19:29
  • 4
    Warning: Because the loop treats intermediate substitution results as format strings of their own, this solution is vulnerable to format string attacks. Any correct solution should make one single pass through the format string. – 200_success May 15 '18 at 14:24
6
public static String format(String format, Map<String, Object> values) {
    StringBuilder formatter = new StringBuilder(format);
    List<Object> valueList = new ArrayList<Object>();

    Matcher matcher = Pattern.compile("\\$\\{(\\w+)}").matcher(format);

    while (matcher.find()) {
        String key = matcher.group(1);

        String formatKey = String.format("${%s}", key);
        int index = formatter.indexOf(formatKey);

        if (index != -1) {
            formatter.replace(index, index + formatKey.length(), "%s");
            valueList.add(values.get(key));
        }
    }

    return String.format(formatter.toString(), valueList.toArray());
}

Example:

String format = "My name is ${1}. ${0} ${1}.";

Map<String, Object> values = new HashMap<String, Object>();
values.put("0", "James");
values.put("1", "Bond");

System.out.println(format(format, values)); // My name is Bond. James Bond.
  • 2
    This should be the answer, since it avoids the format string attacks that most of the other solutions here are vulnerable to. Note that Java 9 makes it much simpler, with support for .replaceAll() string substitution callbacks. – 200_success May 15 '18 at 14:36
  • This should be the answer, for that it doesn't use any external libraries. – Bohao LI May 13 at 14:59
5

This is an old thread, but just for the record, you could also use Java 8 style, like this:

public static String replaceParams(Map<String, String> hashMap, String template) {
    return hashMap.entrySet().stream().reduce(template, (s, e) -> s.replace("%(" + e.getKey() + ")", e.getValue()),
            (s, s2) -> s);
}

Usage:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    final HashMap<String, String> hashMap = new HashMap<String, String>() {
        {
            put("foo", "foo1");
            put("bar", "bar1");
            put("car", "BMW");
            put("truck", "MAN");
        }
    };
    String res = replaceParams(hashMap, "This is '%(foo)' and '%(foo)', but also '%(bar)' '%(bar)' indeed.");
    System.out.println(res);
    System.out.println(replaceParams(hashMap, "This is '%(car)' and '%(foo)', but also '%(bar)' '%(bar)' indeed."));
    System.out.println(replaceParams(hashMap, "This is '%(car)' and '%(truck)', but also '%(foo)' '%(bar)' + '%(truck)' indeed."));
}

The output will be:

This is 'foo1' and 'foo1', but also 'bar1' 'bar1' indeed.
This is 'BMW' and 'foo1', but also 'bar1' 'bar1' indeed.
This is 'BMW' and 'MAN', but also 'foo1' 'bar1' + 'MAN' indeed.
  • This is brilliant, but sadly it violates the specs here docs.oracle.com/javase/8/docs/api/java/util/stream/… The combiner function must return the second parameter if the first param is the identity. The one above would return the identity instead. It also violates this rule: combiner.apply(u, accumulator.apply(identity, t)) == accumulator.apply(u, t) – Ali Cheaito Sep 1 '17 at 14:58
  • Interesting ... but only if you propose a nicer way to pass the map, also if possible after the template like most formatting code. – Christophe Roussy Sep 27 '17 at 11:39
  • 4
    Warning: Because the .reduce() treats intermediate substitution results as format strings of their own, this solution is vulnerable to format string attacks. Any correct solution should make one single pass through the format string. – 200_success May 15 '18 at 14:24
3

I am the author of a small library that does exactly what you want:

Student student = new Student("Andrei", 30, "Male");

String studStr = template("#{id}\tName: #{st.getName}, Age: #{st.getAge}, Gender: #{st.getGender}")
                    .arg("id", 10)
                    .arg("st", student)
                    .format();
System.out.println(studStr);

Or you can chain the arguments:

String result = template("#{x} + #{y} = #{z}")
                    .args("x", 5, "y", 10, "z", 15)
                    .format();
System.out.println(result);

// Output: "5 + 10 = 15"
  • is it possible to do condition based formatting with your library? – gaurav Jan 31 at 10:38
  • @gaurav not quite. If you need that you need a full-featured templating library. – Andrei Ciobanu Feb 1 at 9:05
1

You could have something like this on a string helper class

/**
 * An interpreter for strings with named placeholders.
 *
 * For example given the string "hello %(myName)" and the map <code>
 *      <p>Map<String, Object> map = new HashMap<String, Object>();</p>
 *      <p>map.put("myName", "world");</p>
 * </code>
 *
 * the call {@code format("hello %(myName)", map)} returns "hello world"
 *
 * It replaces every occurrence of a named placeholder with its given value
 * in the map. If there is a named place holder which is not found in the
 * map then the string will retain that placeholder. Likewise, if there is
 * an entry in the map that does not have its respective placeholder, it is
 * ignored.
 *
 * @param str
 *            string to format
 * @param values
 *            to replace
 * @return formatted string
 */
public static String format(String str, Map<String, Object> values) {

    StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder(str);

    for (Entry<String, Object> entry : values.entrySet()) {

        int start;
        String pattern = "%(" + entry.getKey() + ")";
        String value = entry.getValue().toString();

        // Replace every occurence of %(key) with value
        while ((start = builder.indexOf(pattern)) != -1) {
            builder.replace(start, start + pattern.length(), value);
        }
    }

    return builder.toString();
}
  • Thanks a lot, it does almost what I want, but the only thing is it does not account modifiers (consider "%(key)08d") – Andy Feb 19 '10 at 8:51
  • 1
    Note also that this goes into an infinite loop if any of the values being used contain the corresponding entry. – Aaron Dufour Jul 6 '12 at 19:21
  • 1
    Warning: Because the loop treats intermediate substitution results as format strings of their own, this solution is vulnerable to format string attacks. Any correct solution should make one single pass through the format string. – 200_success May 15 '18 at 14:23
1

My answer is to:

a) use StringBuilder when possible

b) keep (in any form: integer is the best, speciall char like dollar macro etc) position of "placeholder" and then use StringBuilder.insert() (few versions of arguments).

Using external libraries seems overkill and I belive degrade performance significant, when StringBuilder is converted to String internally.

1

Based on the answer I created MapBuilder class:

public class MapBuilder {

    public static Map<String, Object> build(Object... data) {
        Map<String, Object> result = new LinkedHashMap<>();

        if (data.length % 2 != 0) {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("Odd number of arguments");
        }

        String key = null;
        Integer step = -1;

        for (Object value : data) {
            step++;
            switch (step % 2) {
                case 0:
                    if (value == null) {
                        throw new IllegalArgumentException("Null key value");
                    }
                    key = (String) value;
                    continue;
                case 1:
                    result.put(key, value);
                    break;
            }
        }

        return result;
    }

}

then I created class StringFormat for String formatting:

public final class StringFormat {

    public static String format(String format, Object... args) {
        Map<String, Object> values = MapBuilder.build(args);

        for (Map.Entry<String, Object> entry : values.entrySet()) {
            String key = entry.getKey();
            Object value = entry.getValue();
            format = format.replace("$" + key, value.toString());
        }

        return format;
    }

}

which you could use like that:

String bookingDate = StringFormat.format("From $startDate to $endDate"), 
        "$startDate", formattedStartDate, 
        "$endDate", formattedEndDate
);
1

Apache Commons Lang's replaceEach method may come in handy dependeding on your specific needs. You can easily use it to replace placeholders by name with this single method call:

StringUtils.replaceEach("There's an incorrect value '%(value)' in column # %(column)",
            new String[] { "%(value)", "%(column)" }, new String[] { x, y });

Given some input text, this will replace all occurrences of the placeholders in the first string array with the corresponding values in the second one.

1

I created also a util/helper class (using jdk 8) which can format a string an replaces occurrences of variables.

For this purpose I used the Matchers "appendReplacement" method which does all the substitution and loops only over the affected parts of a format string.

The helper class isn't currently well javadoc documented. I will changes this in the future ;) Anyway I commented the most important lines (I hope).

    public class FormatHelper {

    //Prefix and suffix for the enclosing variable name in the format string.
    //Replace the default values with any you need.
    public static final String DEFAULT_PREFIX = "${";
    public static final String DEFAULT_SUFFIX = "}";

    //Define dynamic function what happens if a key is not found.
    //Replace the defualt exception with any "unchecked" exception type you need or any other behavior.
    public static final BiFunction<String, String, String> DEFAULT_NO_KEY_FUNCTION =
            (fullMatch, variableName) -> {
                throw new RuntimeException(String.format("Key: %s for variable %s not found.",
                                                         variableName,
                                                         fullMatch));
            };
    private final Pattern variablePattern;
    private final Map<String, String> values;
    private final BiFunction<String, String, String> noKeyFunction;
    private final String prefix;
    private final String suffix;

    public FormatHelper(Map<String, String> values) {
        this(DEFAULT_NO_KEY_FUNCTION, values);
    }

    public FormatHelper(
            BiFunction<String, String, String> noKeyFunction, Map<String, String> values) {
        this(DEFAULT_PREFIX, DEFAULT_SUFFIX, noKeyFunction, values);
    }

    public FormatHelper(String prefix, String suffix, Map<String, String> values) {
        this(prefix, suffix, DEFAULT_NO_KEY_FUNCTION, values);
    }

    public FormatHelper(
            String prefix,
            String suffix,
            BiFunction<String, String, String> noKeyFunction,
            Map<String, String> values) {
        this.prefix = prefix;
        this.suffix = suffix;
        this.values = values;
        this.noKeyFunction = noKeyFunction;

        //Create the Pattern and quote the prefix and suffix so that the regex don't interpret special chars.
        //The variable name is a "\w+" in an extra capture group.
        variablePattern = Pattern.compile(Pattern.quote(prefix) + "(\\w+)" + Pattern.quote(suffix));
    }

    public static String format(CharSequence format, Map<String, String> values) {
        return new FormatHelper(values).format(format);
    }

    public static String format(
            CharSequence format,
            BiFunction<String, String, String> noKeyFunction,
            Map<String, String> values) {
        return new FormatHelper(noKeyFunction, values).format(format);
    }

    public static String format(
            String prefix, String suffix, CharSequence format, Map<String, String> values) {
        return new FormatHelper(prefix, suffix, values).format(format);
    }

    public static String format(
            String prefix,
            String suffix,
            BiFunction<String, String, String> noKeyFunction,
            CharSequence format,
            Map<String, String> values) {
        return new FormatHelper(prefix, suffix, noKeyFunction, values).format(format);
    }

    public String format(CharSequence format) {

        //Create matcher based on the init pattern for variable names.
        Matcher matcher = variablePattern.matcher(format);

        //This buffer will hold all parts of the formatted finished string.
        StringBuffer formatBuffer = new StringBuffer();

        //loop while the matcher finds another variable (prefix -> name <- suffix) match
        while (matcher.find()) {

            //The root capture group with the full match e.g ${variableName}
            String fullMatch = matcher.group();

            //The capture group for the variable name resulting from "(\w+)" e.g. variableName
            String variableName = matcher.group(1);

            //Get the value in our Map so the Key is the used variable name in our "format" string. The associated value will replace the variable.
            //If key is missing (absent) call the noKeyFunction with parameters "fullMatch" and "variableName" else return the value.
            String value = values.computeIfAbsent(variableName, key -> noKeyFunction.apply(fullMatch, key));

            //Escape the Map value because the "appendReplacement" method interprets the $ and \ as special chars.
            String escapedValue = Matcher.quoteReplacement(value);

            //The "appendReplacement" method replaces the current "full" match (e.g. ${variableName}) with the value from the "values" Map.
            //The replaced part of the "format" string is appended to the StringBuffer "formatBuffer".
            matcher.appendReplacement(formatBuffer, escapedValue);
        }

        //The "appendTail" method appends the last part of the "format" String which has no regex match.
        //That means if e.g. our "format" string has no matches the whole untouched "format" string is appended to the StringBuffer "formatBuffer".
        //Further more the method return the buffer.
        return matcher.appendTail(formatBuffer)
                      .toString();
    }

    public String getPrefix() {
        return prefix;
    }

    public String getSuffix() {
        return suffix;
    }

    public Map<String, String> getValues() {
        return values;
    }
}

You can create a class instance for a specific Map with values (or suffix prefix or noKeyFunction) like:

    Map<String, String> values = new HashMap<>();
    values.put("firstName", "Peter");
    values.put("lastName", "Parker");


    FormatHelper formatHelper = new FormatHelper(values);
    formatHelper.format("${firstName} ${lastName} is Spiderman!");
    // Result: "Peter Parker is Spiderman!"
    // Next format:
    formatHelper.format("Does ${firstName} ${lastName} works as photographer?");
    //Result: "Does Peter Parker works as photographer?"

Further more you can define what happens if a key in the values Map is missing (works in both ways e.g. wrong variable name in format string or missing key in Map). The default behavior is an thrown unchecked exception (unchecked because I use the default jdk8 Function which cant handle checked exceptions) like:

    Map<String, String> map = new HashMap<>();
    map.put("firstName", "Peter");
    map.put("lastName", "Parker");


    FormatHelper formatHelper = new FormatHelper(map);
    formatHelper.format("${missingName} ${lastName} is Spiderman!");
    //Result: RuntimeException: Key: missingName for variable ${missingName} not found.

You can define a custom behavior in the constructor call like:

Map<String, String> values = new HashMap<>();
values.put("firstName", "Peter");
values.put("lastName", "Parker");


FormatHelper formatHelper = new FormatHelper(fullMatch, variableName) -> variableName.equals("missingName") ? "John": "SOMETHING_WRONG", values);
formatHelper.format("${missingName} ${lastName} is Spiderman!");
// Result: "John Parker is Spiderman!"

or delegate it back to the default no key behavior:

...
    FormatHelper formatHelper = new FormatHelper((fullMatch, variableName) ->   variableName.equals("missingName") ? "John" :
            FormatHelper.DEFAULT_NO_KEY_FUNCTION.apply(fullMatch,
                                                       variableName), map);
...

For better handling there are also static method representations like:

Map<String, String> values = new HashMap<>();
values.put("firstName", "Peter");
values.put("lastName", "Parker");

FormatHelper.format("${firstName} ${lastName} is Spiderman!", map);
// Result: "Peter Parker is Spiderman!"
  • Very good class. Keep up the good work – Spotlightsrule Nov 28 '18 at 3:25
1

Try Freemarker, templating library.

alt text

  • 4
    Freemarker? i guess he is willing to know, how to do this in plain java. Anyways if Freemarker is the probable answer then can i say JSP too will be the correct answer? – Rakesh Juyal Feb 18 '10 at 6:27
  • 1
    Thanks, but for my task at hand this seems to be kind of overkill. But thanks. – Andy Feb 18 '10 at 7:42
  • 1
    @Rakesh JSP is a very "view/FE" specific thing. I have used FreeMarker in the past for generating XML and sometimes even generated JAVA files. Andy am afraid you will have to write one utility yourself (or like the one prescribed above) – Kannan Ekanath Feb 18 '10 at 15:02
  • @Boris which one is better freemarker vs velocity vs stringtemplate? – gaurav Jan 31 at 10:39
  • 1
    @gaurav take a look at stackoverflow.com/questions/3741618/… and dzone.com/articles/… – Boris Pavlović Jan 31 at 10:42

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