8

I'm an absolute beginner and am trying to create a bash script to randomize the start and exit of a command line app. I plan to autostart the script on boot (Crunchbang) after a slight delay with the following in autostart.sh (found here: http://interwebworld.co.uk/2011/10/23/how-to-launch-programs-automatically-at-startup-in-crunchbang-linux/ )

(sleep 300s && /home/myuser/Scripts/randomizer.sh) &

This is essentially what I need to accomplish in the randomizer.sh script, in a bit of pseudocode:

start applicationfile
wait a random period of time
if applicationfile is still running
    kill its process
    wait a random period of time
    exit this script and restart this script
else exit this script and restart this script

The randomizer.sh as I have it so far and which I'd welcome some help with, is as follows (containing remnants of the pseudocode), and the sleep delay found here: http://blog.buberel.org/2010/07/howto-random-sleep-duration-in-bash.html

/path/to/applicationfile -s 111.222.333.444 -u username -p password
sleep $[ ( $RANDOM % 150 ) + 60 ]m
if applicationfile is still running
    kill $(ps aux | grep '[u]sername' | awk '{print $2}')
    sleep $[ ( $RANDOM % 150 ) + 60 ]m
    exec $randomizer.sh
else exec $randomizer.sh

I "think" the non-pseudo parts should work pretty much as they are, but please correct me or adjust if I'm wrong. The initial applicationfile command line works as it is, and I already tested the process kill line and it works as expected. Applicationfile doesn't have a built-in way to end itself from commandline, but the dead connection on the remote machine will be killed after 5 minutes of being killed locally, so killing it locally is acceptable for my needs.

What I don't have any idea how to handle is the line above the kill, which checks "if" the process is running in the first place. Sorry for the wall of text but I wanted to show I've done as much as I could already.

14

In bash, $! is the PID of the last launched process, so something patterned along the lines of this should work:

mycommand &
last_pid=$!
sleep( $RANDOM )
kill -KILL $last_pid

You can, of course, fiddle around to change the signal you send, the relationship between $RANDOM and the time you want to sleep, etc.

It's somewhat unlikely that a new process will get the same PID unless either a) the sleep time is very long or b) your machine launches a lot of short-lived processes. On Linux, PIDs are allocated cyclically with a max of 32,765, so, roughly speaking, you would have to have launched about that many processes in the sleep time to risk hitting the same PID belonging to a different process. If that's a risk, you could add a test (technically, there's a race here, but it's very unlikely to be a problem). The following seems like it would do what you want.

signal=KILL

sleep_a_while () {
    sleep $[ ( $RANDOM % 150 ) + 60 ]m
}

while true; do
    # Note: command launched in background:
    /path/to/applicationfile -s 111.222.333.444 -u username -p password &

    # Save PID of command just launched:
    last_pid=$!

    # Sleep for a while:
    sleep_a_while

    # See if the command is still running, and kill it and sleep more if it is:
    if ps -p $last_pid -o comm= | grep -qs '^applicationfile$'; then
        kill -$signal $last_pid 2> /dev/null
        sleep_a_while
    fi

    # Go back to the beginning and launch the command again
done

I've replaced the self-exec with an equivalent loop.

On the kill line, the redirect of stderr to /dev/null is desirable because of a race. The process might exit naturally between the time the ps completes and the time that the kill is executed, resulting in a harmless error message. This race is unavoidable (and harmless) unless the test that the PID exists and the sending of the signal are coincident.

If there is intended to be at most one instance of applicationfile running at a time, then this race can be avoided entirely by replacing:

# See if the command is still running, and kill it and sleep more if it is:
if ps -p $last_pid -o comm= | grep -qs '^applicationfile$'; then
    kill -$signal $last_pid 2> /dev/null
    sleep_a_while
fi

With:

killall -q applicationfile && sleep_a_while

If this cannot be used, Keith Reynolds's variant of the test is better, since it avoids an unnecessary grep, i.e. using:

# See if the command is still running, and kill it and sleep more if it is:
if [ "$(ps -p $last_pid -o comm=)" = "applicationfile" ]; then
    kill -$signal $last_pid 2> /dev/null
    sleep_a_while
fi
  • So assign PID to a variable and then kill that PID? Shouldn't the kill be in an 'if', to kill the process only if it's actually still alive? What if some other factor (i.e. remote disconnect, app crash, etc) stopped that process in the meantime and another process has been given that ID and is then mistakenly killed? Also, the second sleep should only happen inside an "if" so if the process has been killed prematurely, the script skips the second sleep and goes straight to restart. But if the script is still running, then kill it, then sleep some more, then restart. – graphics.guy Apr 4 '14 at 16:40
  • I've updated my answer, trying to mirror the logic of your question as closely as possible. I hope it works for you. – Emmet Apr 4 '14 at 17:24
  • 2
    The code if ps -p $last_pid -o comm= | grep '^applicationfile$'; then unnecessarily spits out the string applicationfile – Keith Reynolds Apr 4 '14 at 17:30
  • @Emmet & Keith: Thank you both for your valuable input and suggestions. I'm going to try both of your variants this weekend and see which works best, and then will post a follow-up. – graphics.guy Apr 4 '14 at 19:53
  • Emmet, I've just run your version through some tests and it seems that last_pid is actually killing the sleep process and not the executable process. The sequence is as follows: 1. GUI interface opens on the VM I'm testing in. 2. GUI successfully logs in to remote server. 3. 'ps aufx' shows random times in each test, so the sleep randomizer is working as expected. 4. Sleep time expires 5. A second GUI immediately opens and original GUI remains. -- Also, the second sleep period never runs. After several loops, 'ps aufx' shows multiple PIDs of executable, but only 1 sleep PID. – graphics.guy Apr 5 '14 at 22:08
3

Try this code for your randomizer.sh

min_val=60
range=150
while true ; do
    run_this_command &
    last_pid=$!
    sleep $[ ( $RANDOM % $range ) + $min_val ]
    { [ "$(ps -p $last_pid -o comm= )" ] && \
      [ "$(ps -p $last_pid -o comm= )" = run_this_command ]; 
    } && { kill -KILL $last_pid ;}
done

Some notes:

  1. Rather than using the exec statement. You can accomplish what your trying to do more simply by staying inside a while loop. The randomiser.sh I present is only read from the hard drive once.
  2. The code { [ condition ] && { command ;} && command runs faster than if [ condition ]; then command, else command; fi
  3. With the variable $last_pid assigned to the value of $!, the command ps -p $last_pid -o comm= will spit out the name of the process with the PID of $last_pid. If there is no PID with that value then its exist code is 1.

Amended to meet the additional random wait period before start requirement:

# Minimum and range values for random Wait before start in seconds
MinA=60;RangeA=150 
# Minimum and range values for random Wait before kill in seconds
MinB=60; RangeB=150 # 
while true ; do
    sleep $[ ( $RANDOM % $RangeA ) + $MinA ] 
    run_this_command &
    last_pid=$!
    sleep $[ ( $RANDOM % $RangeB ) + $MinB ] 
    { [ "$(ps -p $last_pid -o comm= )" ] && \
      [ "$(ps -p $last_pid -o comm= )" = run_this_command ]
    } && \{ kill -KILL $last_pid ;}
done
  • The test (3.) doesn't achieve anything, IMHO. Without it, if the process doesn't exist, kill will just fail harmlessly. If the process exists, it will be killed whether or not it is an instance of run_this_command. OP identified PID reuse as a potential issue earlier. – Emmet Apr 4 '14 at 19:57
  • I think you misunderstand. I'm saying that nothing on that line (with the &&) materially affects the overall behavior vs. simply having kill -KILL $last_pid except for a single harmless error message (that can be silenced). Explanation: If the LHS succeeds, the process will be killed whether or not the process is an instance of run_this_command. If the LHS fails, the RHS is not run, which is functionally identical to killing a PID that does not exist. The only reason to have the test at all is to ensure that the PID to be killed corresponds to an instance of run_this_command. See? – Emmet Apr 4 '14 at 21:31
  • If you used [ "$(ps -p $last_pid -o comm=)" = "run_this_command" ] && kill -KILL $last_pid, it would make perfect sense. Otherwise you might as well just do ps $last_pid > /dev/null && kill -KILL $last_pid or just kill -KILL $last_pid > /dev/null. – Emmet Apr 4 '14 at 21:37
  • @Emmet I respectfully disagree. Running [ "$(ps -p 1 -o comm=" ) ] && echo "PID exist" finishes with PID exist whereas [ "$(ps -p 100 -o comm= )" ] && echo "PID exist" finishes with nothing to the terminal because there is no process with the ID 100. This behavior is entirely different than having just kill -KILL $last_pid as you suggested. This is so because the exit code of ps -p 100 -o comm= effects [ "$(ps -p 100 -o comm=)" ]` the same way the exit code of true effect [ true ] && echo exit code is 0 and the exit code of false effects [ false ] || echo exit code is 1 – Keith Reynolds Apr 4 '14 at 22:03
  • First: suppose run_this_command gets PID 1000, but exits almost immediately, and the sleep is for its maximum value of 3½ hours. 3 hours into the sleep, an unrelated daemon is launched and gets PID 1000 because the PID assignments have wrapped around. Your solution will kill the unrelated daemon. This was identified as a potential issue by the OP. – Emmet Apr 4 '14 at 22:14

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