0

I was just discovering the Roslyn source code and I saw a code snippet looks like this:

var text = stringBuilder.ToString();
int length;
do
{
    length = text.Length;
    text = text.Replace("{\r\n\r\n", "{\r\n");
} while (text.Length != length);

It looks odd to me because the String.Replace method, replaces all the occurrences of specified string with a new value in one time.So this loop is executing for first time, perform the changes then executing again for second time and do nothing. Then it ends.. So what is the point of using a loop instead of just write:

var text =  stringBuilder.ToString();
text = text.Replace("{\r\n\r\n", "{\r\n");

Or even shorter:

var text = stringBuilder.ToString().Replace("{\r\n\r\n", "{\r\n");

Am I missing something ?

  • 1
    Yes - you're missing that the string could contain more than two linebreaks after the bracket "{" - it would then continue to delete the additional linebreaks until only one remains. – Marwie Apr 5 '14 at 21:12
  • I don't really like that code as it is difficult to understand. Of course, it may be a bit faster, but why not use String.Contains("{\r\n")? I don't know where exactly this snippet is used and how long the input is, but normally this would not speed down the program noticably. – jalgames Apr 5 '14 at 21:18
  • @user2241553: What exactly would you want to achieve with String.Contains("{\r\n")? – O. R. Mapper Apr 5 '14 at 21:21
  • 1
    I don't think it's that hard to understand, and a single comment would have made it perfectly clear. Plus, for most string libraries (and strings in C#) String.Length is O(1) and String.Contains is O(n). Of course, you could do the entire replacement in a single pass using regular expressions, but... – Jeremy West Apr 5 '14 at 21:22
6

Suppose the string has three blank lines after an open brace:

"{\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n"

The first iteration would produce this:

"{\r\n\r\n\r\n"

The second would produce this:

"{\r\n\r\n"

And the third would produce:

"{\r\n"

Each iteration removes a single blank line.

  • A much more expressive version of my answer. – Martin Costello Apr 5 '14 at 21:17
  • that does make sense.I can't believe I miss that :) I will accept this as soon as I can. – Selman Genç Apr 5 '14 at 21:18
3

Yes - you're missing that the string could contain more than two linebreaks after the bracket "{" - it would then continue to delete the additional linebreaks until only one remains.

2

It's using recursion (of a sort) to handle one set of replacements exposing a new set characters that subsequently need replacing in the same way.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.