I want a random string of characters only (uppercase or lowercase), no numbers, in Go. What is the fastest and simplest way to do this?

  • 2
    @VinceEmigh: Here's a meta topic discussing basic questions. meta.stackoverflow.com/q/274645/395461 Personally, I think basic questions are ok if written well and are on-topic. Look at the answers below, they illustrate a bunch of things that would be useful for someone new to go. For loops, type casting, make(), etc. – Shannon Aug 6 '15 at 1:01
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    @Shannon "This question does not show any research effort" (first highly upvoted answer in your link) - That's what I was referring to. He shows no research effort. No effort at all (an attempt, or even stating that he looked online, which he obviously hasn't). Although it would be useful for someone new, this site is not focused on teaching new people. It's focused on answering specific programming problems/questions, not tutorials/guides. Although it could be used for the latter, that is not the focus, and thus this question should be closed. Instead, its spoonfed /: – Vince Emigh Aug 6 '15 at 1:08
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    @VinceEmigh I asked this question a year back. I had searched online for random strings and read docs too. But It was not helpful. If I haven't written in the question, then it doesn't mean that I haven't researched. – Anish Shah Aug 6 '15 at 17:17
up vote 507 down vote accepted

Paul's solution provides a simple, general solution.

The question asks for the "the fastest and simplest way". Let's address this. We'll arrive at our final, fastest code in an iterative manner. Benchmarking each iteration can be found at the end of the answer.

All the solutions and the benchmarking code can be found on the Go Playground. The code on the Playground is a test file, not an executable. You have to save it into a file named XX_test.go and run it with go test -bench ..

I. Improvements

1. Genesis (Runes)

As a reminder, the original, general solution we're improving is this:

func init() {
    rand.Seed(time.Now().UnixNano())
}

var letterRunes = []rune("abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ")

func RandStringRunes(n int) string {
    b := make([]rune, n)
    for i := range b {
        b[i] = letterRunes[rand.Intn(len(letterRunes))]
    }
    return string(b)
}

2. Bytes

If the characters to choose from and assemble the random string contains only the uppercase and lowercase letters of the English alphabet, we can work with bytes only because the English alphabet letters map to bytes 1-to-1 in the UTF-8 encoding (which is how Go stores strings).

So instead of:

var letters = []rune("abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ")

we can use:

var letters = []bytes("abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ")

Or even better:

const letters = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ"

Now this is already a big improvement: we could achieve it to be a const (there are string constants but there are no slice constants). As an extra gain, the expression len(letters) will also be a const! (The expression len(s) is constant if s is a string constant.)

And at what cost? Nothing at all. strings can be indexed which indexes its bytes, perfect, exactly what we want.

Our next destination looks like this:

const letterBytes = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ"

func RandStringBytes(n int) string {
    b := make([]byte, n)
    for i := range b {
        b[i] = letterBytes[rand.Intn(len(letterBytes))]
    }
    return string(b)
}

3. Remainder

Previous solutions get a random number to designate a random letter by calling rand.Intn() which delegates to Rand.Intn() which delegates to Rand.Int31n().

This is much slower compared to rand.Int63() which produces a random number with 63 random bits.

So we could simply call rand.Int63() and use the remainder after dividing by len(letterBytes):

func RandStringBytesRmndr(n int) string {
    b := make([]byte, n)
    for i := range b {
        b[i] = letterBytes[rand.Int63() % int64(len(letterBytes))]
    }
    return string(b)
}

This works and is significantly faster, the disadvantage is that the probability of all the letters will not be exactly the same (assuming rand.Int63() produces all 63-bit numbers with equal probability). Although the distortion is extremely small as the number of letters 52 is much-much smaller than 1<<63 - 1, so in practice this is perfectly fine.

To make this understand easier: let's say you want a random number in the range of 0..5. Using 3 random bits, this would produce the numbers 0..1 with double probability than from the range 2..5. Using 5 random bits, numbers in range 0..1 would occur with 6/32 probability and numbers in range 2..5 with 5/32 probability which is now closer to the desired. Increasing the number of bits makes this less significant, when reaching 63 bits, it is negligible.

4. Masking

Building on the previous solution, we can maintain the equal distribution of letters by using only as many of the lowest bits of the random number as many is required to represent the number of letters. So for example if we have 52 letters, it requires 6 bits to represent it: 52 = 110100b. So we will only use the lowest 6 bits of the number returned by rand.Int63(). And to maintain equal distribution of letters, we only "accept" the number if it falls in the range 0..len(letterBytes)-1. If the lowest bits are greater, we discard it and query a new random number.

Note that the chance of the lowest bits to be greater than or equal to len(letterBytes) is less than 0.5 in general (0.25 on average), which means that even if this would be the case, repeating this "rare" case decreases the chance of not finding a good number. After n repetition, the chance that we sill don't have a good index is much less than pow(0.5, n), and this is just an upper estimation. In case of 52 letters the chance that the 6 lowest bits are not good is only (64-52)/64 = 0.19; which means for example that chances to not have a good number after 10 repetition is 1e-8.

So here is the solution:

const letterBytes = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ"
const (
    letterIdxBits = 6                    // 6 bits to represent a letter index
    letterIdxMask = 1<<letterIdxBits - 1 // All 1-bits, as many as letterIdxBits
)

func RandStringBytesMask(n int) string {
    b := make([]byte, n)
    for i := 0; i < n; {
        if idx := int(rand.Int63() & letterIdxMask); idx < len(letterBytes) {
            b[i] = letterBytes[idx]
            i++
        }
    }
    return string(b)
}

5. Masking Improved

The previous solution only uses the lowest 6 bits of the 63 random bits returned by rand.Int63(). This is a waste as getting the random bits is the slowest part of our algorithm.

If we have 52 letters, that means 6 bits code a letter index. So 63 random bits can designate 63/6 = 10 different letter indices. Let's use all those 10:

const letterBytes = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ"
const (
    letterIdxBits = 6                    // 6 bits to represent a letter index
    letterIdxMask = 1<<letterIdxBits - 1 // All 1-bits, as many as letterIdxBits
    letterIdxMax  = 63 / letterIdxBits   // # of letter indices fitting in 63 bits
)

func RandStringBytesMaskImpr(n int) string {
    b := make([]byte, n)
    // A rand.Int63() generates 63 random bits, enough for letterIdxMax letters!
    for i, cache, remain := n-1, rand.Int63(), letterIdxMax; i >= 0; {
        if remain == 0 {
            cache, remain = rand.Int63(), letterIdxMax
        }
        if idx := int(cache & letterIdxMask); idx < len(letterBytes) {
            b[i] = letterBytes[idx]
            i--
        }
        cache >>= letterIdxBits
        remain--
    }

    return string(b)
}

6. Source

The Masking Improved is pretty good, not much we can improve on it. We could, but not worth the complexity.

Now let's find something else to improve. The source of random numbers.

There is a crypto/rand package which provides a Read(b []byte) function, so we could use that to get as many bytes with a single call as many we need. This wouldn't help in terms of performance as crypto/rand implements a cryptographically secure pseudorandom number generator so it's much slower.

So let's stick to the math/rand package. The rand.Rand uses a rand.Source as the source of random bits. rand.Source is an interface which specifies a Int63() int64 method: exactly and the only thing we needed and used in our latest solution.

So we don't really need a rand.Rand (either explicit or the global, shared one of the rand package), a rand.Source is perfectly enough for us:

var src = rand.NewSource(time.Now().UnixNano())

func RandStringBytesMaskImprSrc(n int) string {
    b := make([]byte, n)
    // A src.Int63() generates 63 random bits, enough for letterIdxMax characters!
    for i, cache, remain := n-1, src.Int63(), letterIdxMax; i >= 0; {
        if remain == 0 {
            cache, remain = src.Int63(), letterIdxMax
        }
        if idx := int(cache & letterIdxMask); idx < len(letterBytes) {
            b[i] = letterBytes[idx]
            i--
        }
        cache >>= letterIdxBits
        remain--
    }

    return string(b)
}

Also note that this last solution doesn't require you to initialize (seed) the global Rand of the math/rand package as that is not used (and our rand.Source is properly initialized / seeded).

One more thing to note here: package doc of math/rand states:

The default Source is safe for concurrent use by multiple goroutines.

So the default source is slower than a Source that may be obtained by rand.NewSource(), because the default source has to provide safety under concurrent access / use, while rand.NewSource() does not offer this (and thus the Source returned by it is more likely to be faster).

(7. Using rand.Read())

Go 1.7 added a rand.Read() function and a Rand.Read() method. We should be tempted to use these to read as many bytes as we need in one step, in order to achieve better performance.

There is one small "problem" with this: how many bytes do we need? We could say: as many as the number of output letters. We would think this is an upper estimation, as a letter index uses less than 8 bits (1 byte). But at this point we are already doing worse (as getting the random bits is the "hard part"), and we're getting more than needed.

Also note that to maintain equal distribution of all letter indices, there might be some "garbage" random data that we won't be able to use, so we would end up skipping some data, and thus end up short when we go through all the byte slice. We would need to further get more random bytes, "recursively". And now we're even losing the "single call to rand package" advantage...

We could "somewhat" optimize the usage of the random data we acquire from math.Rand(). We may estimate how many bytes (bits) we'll need. 1 letter requires letterIdxBits bits, and we need n letters, so we need n * letterIdxBits / 8.0 bytes rounding up. We can calculate the probability of a random index not being usable (see above), so we could request more that will "more likely" be enough (if it turns out it's not, we repeat the process). We can process the byte slice as a "bit stream" for example, for which we have a nice 3rd party lib: github.com/icza/bitio (disclosure: I'm the author).

But Benchmark code still shows we're not winning. Why is it so?

The answer to the last question is because rand.Read() uses a loop and keeps calling Source.Int63() until it fills the passed slice. Exactly what the RandStringBytesMaskImprSrc() solution does, without the intermediate buffer, and without the added complexity. That's why RandStringBytesMaskImprSrc() remains on the throne. Yes, RandStringBytesMaskImprSrc() uses an unsynchronized rand.Source unlike rand.Read(). But the reasoning still applies; and which is proven if we use Rand.Read() instead of rand.Read() (the former is also unsynchronzed).

II. Benchmark

All right, let's benchmark the different solutions.

BenchmarkRunes                   1000000              1703 ns/op
BenchmarkBytes                   1000000              1328 ns/op
BenchmarkBytesRmndr              1000000              1012 ns/op
BenchmarkBytesMask               1000000              1214 ns/op
BenchmarkBytesMaskImpr           5000000               395 ns/op
BenchmarkBytesMaskImprSrc        5000000               303 ns/op

Just by switching from runes to bytes, we immediately have 22% performance gain.

Getting rid of rand.Intn() and using rand.Int63() instead gives another 24% boost.

Masking (and repeating in case of big indices) slows down a little (due to repetition calls): -20%...

But when we make use of all (or most) of the 63 random bits (10 indices from one rand.Int63() call): that speeds up 3.4 times.

And finally if we settle with a (non-default, new) rand.Source instead of rand.Rand, we again gain 23%.

Comparing the final to the initial solution: RandStringBytesMaskImprSrc() is 5.6 times faster than RandStringRunes().

  • 8
    A word of warning: this solution is not thread/goroutine safe. I've replaced calls to Int63 with the following: play.golang.org/p/HOZ8ox1E6P – RobbieV Aug 14 '15 at 12:56
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    @RobbieV Yup, because a shared rand.Source is used. A better workaround would be to pass a rand.Source to the RandStringBytesMaskImprSrc() function, and that way no locking is required and therefore performance/efficiency is not effected. Each goroutine could have its own Source. – icza Aug 14 '15 at 13:05
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    @icza, that is one of the best answers I saw for a long time on SO! – astropanic Aug 30 '15 at 12:12
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    @MikeAtlas: Should avoid using defer when it is obvious that you don't need it. See grokbase.com/t/gg/golang-nuts/158zz5p42w/… – Zan Lynx Feb 14 '16 at 23:40
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    @ZanLynx thx for the tip; although defer to unlock a mutex either immediately before or after calling a lock is IMO mostly a very good idea; you're guaranteed to both not forget to unlock but also unlock even in a non-fatal panic mid-function. – Mike Atlas Feb 15 '16 at 17:48

You can just write code for it. This code can be a little simpler if you want to rely on the letters all being single bytes when encoded in UTF-8.

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "math/rand"
)

func init() {
    rand.Seed(time.Now().UnixNano())
}

var letters = []rune("abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ")

func randSeq(n int) string {
    b := make([]rune, n)
    for i := range b {
        b[i] = letters[rand.Intn(len(letters))]
    }
    return string(b)
}

func main() {
    fmt.Println(randSeq(10))
}
  • 24
    Don't forget about the rand.Seed(), otherwise you got the same string every first time launch... rand.Seed(time.Now().UTC().UnixNano()) – Evan Lin Jan 22 '15 at 15:59
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    Evan's addition is correct, however there are other similar options: rand.Seed(time.Now().Unix()) or rand.Seed(time.Now().UnixNano()) – openwonk Jun 20 '15 at 21:50
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    For a hard-to-guess secret--a password, a crypto key, etc.--never use math/rand; use crypto/rand (like @Not_A_Golfer's option 1) instead. – twotwotwo Aug 6 '15 at 5:53
  • @EvanLin Won't this be guessable? If I have to seed the generator, then the attacker could guess the time i'm seeding it with and predict the same output that i'm generating. – code ninja Oct 22 '15 at 10:33
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    Note that if you're trying the above program with seed, on go playground, it will return same result all the time. I was trying it out on playground and after a some time realized this. It worked fine otherwise for me. Hope it saves someones time :) – Gaurav Sinha Apr 1 '16 at 22:51

Two possible options (there might be more of course):

  1. You can use the crypto/rand package that supports reading random byte arrays (from /dev/urandom) and is geared towards cryptographic random generation. see http://golang.org/pkg/crypto/rand/#example_Read . It might be slower than normal pseudo-random number generation though.

  2. Take a random number and hash it using md5 or something like this.

Use package uniuri, which generates cryptographically secure uniform (unbiased) strings.

  • 3
    unlike all of the answers here Did you even read the accepted answer? The first paragraph of the fourth section in particular. – Olegs Jeremejevs Mar 23 '16 at 20:17
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    Who has time for that? This is a great answer, one sentence and uniuri does exactly what I need it do. – ds011591 Oct 23 '17 at 18:02
  • Aside: the author, dchest, is an excellent developer and has produced a number of small, useful packages like this. – Roshambo Oct 19 at 2:01

Following icza's wonderfully explained solution, here is a modification of it that uses crypto/rand instead of math/rand.

const (
    letterBytes = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ" // 52 possibilities
    letterIdxBits = 6                    // 6 bits to represent 64 possibilities / indexes
    letterIdxMask = 1<<letterIdxBits - 1 // All 1-bits, as many as letterIdxBits
)

func SecureRandomAlphaString(length int) string {

    result := make([]byte, length)
    bufferSize := int(float64(length)*1.3)
    for i, j, randomBytes := 0, 0, []byte{}; i < length; j++ {
        if j%bufferSize == 0 {
            randomBytes = SecureRandomBytes(bufferSize)
        }
        if idx := int(randomBytes[j%length] & letterIdxMask); idx < len(letterBytes) {
            result[i] = letterBytes[idx]
            i++
        }
    }

    return string(result)
}

// SecureRandomBytes returns the requested number of bytes using crypto/rand
func SecureRandomBytes(length int) []byte {
    var randomBytes = make([]byte, length)
    _, err := rand.Read(randomBytes)
    if err != nil {
        log.Fatal("Unable to generate random bytes")
    }
    return randomBytes
}

If you want a more generic solution, that allows you to pass in the slice of character bytes to create the string out of, you can try using this:

// SecureRandomString returns a string of the requested length,
// made from the byte characters provided (only ASCII allowed).
// Uses crypto/rand for security. Will panic if len(availableCharBytes) > 256.
func SecureRandomString(availableCharBytes string, length int) string {

    // Compute bitMask
    availableCharLength := len(availableCharBytes)
    if availableCharLength == 0 || availableCharLength > 256 {
        panic("availableCharBytes length must be greater than 0 and less than or equal to 256")
    }
    var bitLength byte
    var bitMask byte
    for bits := availableCharLength - 1; bits != 0; {
        bits = bits >> 1
        bitLength++
    }
    bitMask = 1<<bitLength - 1

    // Compute bufferSize
    bufferSize := length + length / 3

    // Create random string
    result := make([]byte, length)
    for i, j, randomBytes := 0, 0, []byte{}; i < length; j++ {
        if j%bufferSize == 0 {
            // Random byte buffer is empty, get a new one
            randomBytes = SecureRandomBytes(bufferSize)
        }
        // Mask bytes to get an index into the character slice
        if idx := int(randomBytes[j%length] & bitMask); idx < availableCharLength {
            result[i] = availableCharBytes[idx]
            i++
        }
    }

    return string(result)
}

If you want to pass in your own source of randomness, it would be trivial to modify the above to accept an io.Reader instead of using crypto/rand.

Here is my way ) Use math rand or crypto rand as you wish.

func randStr(len int) string {
    buff := make([]byte, len)
    rand.Read(buff)
    str := base64.StdEncoding.EncodeToString(buff)
    // Base 64 can be longer than len
    return str[:len]
}

in addition I've found a package which have bunch of methods to manipulate fake data. Found it useful for seeding database while developing https://github.com/Pallinder/go-randomdata. Might be helpful to someone else as well

If you are willing to add a few characters to your pool of allowed characters, you can make the code work with anything which provides random bytes through a io.Reader. Here we are using crypto/rand.

// len(encodeURL) == 64. This allows (x <= 265) x % 64 to have an even
// distribution.
const encodeURL = "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz0123456789-_"

// A helper function create and fill a slice of length n with characters from
// a-zA-Z0-9_-. It panics if there are any problems getting random bytes.
func RandAsciiBytes(n int) []byte {
    output := make([]byte, n)

    // We will take n bytes, one byte for each character of output.
    randomness := make([]byte, n)

    // read all random
    _, err := rand.Read(randomness)
    if err != nil {
        panic(err)
    }

    // fill output
    for pos := range output {
        // get random item
        random := uint8(randomness[pos])

        // random % 64
        randomPos := random % uint8(len(encodeURL))

        // put into output
        output[pos] = encodeURL[randomPos]
    }

    return output
}
  • why is random % 64 necessary? – Sung Won Cho May 2 at 11:12
  • 1
    Because len(encodeURL) == 64. If random % 64 wasn't done, randomPos could be >= 64 and cause an out of bounds panic at runtime. – 0xcaff May 2 at 15:10

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