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While programming with files I stumbled upon some strange difference between the C library 'fread' function and the POSIX call 'read'; 'read' only reads a few bytes of a file while 'fread' reads the whole file. This code only reads 1024 + 331 bytes, and then 'read' returns 0:

char buf[1024];
int id = open("file.ext", 0);
int len;
while((len = read(id, buf, 1024)) > 0)
    println(len);

while this code reads the whole file as expected, around 11kb:

char buf[1024];
FILE* fp = fopen("file.ext", "rb");
int len;
while((len = fread(buf, 1, 1024, fp)) > 0)
    println(len);

Can you tell why 'read' doesn't read the whole file?

EDIT2: I am sorry, I am using windows with MinGW, and reading a binary file

EDIT: A complete example:

#include <io.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int main() {

    char buf[1024];
    int len;

    // loop 1
    int id = open("file.ext", 0);
    while((len = read(id, buf, 1024)) > 0) {
        printf("%d\n", len);
    }
    close(id);

    println("--------");

    // loop 2
    FILE* fp = fopen("file.ext", "rb");
    while((len = fread(buf, 1, 1024, fp)) > 0) {
        printf("%d\n", len);
    }
    fclose(fp);

    while(1) {}

    return 0;
}

The output:

1024
331
--------
1024
1024
1024
1024
1024
1024
1024
1024
1024
1024
981
  • Since you're passing in an invalid flags argument to open(), the better question is why your read() is able to get any data at all. From linux.die.net/man/2/open: The argument flags must include one of the following access modes: O_RDONLY, O_WRONLY, or O_RDWR. These request opening the file read-only, write-only, or read/write, respectively. – mah Apr 6 '14 at 14:50
  • @mah: But O_RDONLY is traditionally 0 so the code is probably 'OK', though not standard-compliant wordy. – Jonathan Leffler Apr 6 '14 at 14:51
  • 2
    Are you in Windows? If so, include O_BINARY in the flags to open() – M.M Apr 6 '14 at 15:05
  • 1
    <io.h> is not a POSIX header — what on earth is it really? Which platform are you on? Which compiler are you using? Are you on Windows as Matt hypothesizes? Is the file you're reading actually a binary file or a text file? – Jonathan Leffler Apr 6 '14 at 15:12
  • 2
    Different files being opened! Are you sure they are the same size?... – TheCodeArtist Apr 6 '14 at 15:15
2

You're opening the file the first time in text mode and the second time in binary mode. You need to open it both times in binary mode. If it's not in binary mode, the first control-z (hex value 1A) signals the "end of file".

Add the following includes (getting rid of <io.h>):

#include <unistd.h>
#include <fcntl.h>

The call open like this:

int id = open("spiderman.torrent", O_RDONLY|O_BINARY);

Here's an example of control-z ending the file:

#include <stdio.h>

void writeit() {
  FILE *f = fopen("test.txt", "wb");
  fprintf(f, "hello world\r\n");
  fputc(0x1A, f);
  fprintf(f, "goodbye universe\r\n");
  fclose(f);
}

void readit() {
  int c;
  FILE *f = fopen("test.txt", "r");
  while ((c = fgetc(f)) != EOF)
    putchar(c);
  fclose(f);
}

int main() {
  writeit();
  readit();
  return 0;
}

The above only prints "hello world" and not "goodbye universe".

| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks! I did not know that there was a difference between binary and text modus outside – user3F31A28 Apr 6 '14 at 15:22
  • Note that pure POSIX does not have O_BINARY (do a word search for it on the POSIX 2013 standard site — nary a mention). It is an extra foisted on the system by Windows, assuming it is necessary and that is where the code is running. Requiring O_BINARY to work means that the 'POSIX-compliant code' is not POSIX compliant. – Jonathan Leffler Apr 6 '14 at 15:25
  • @JonathanLeffler Does a fix exist that makes code POSIX-compliant? For the sake of crossplatformness I've added #ifndef _WIN32 #define O_BINARY 0 #endif but is obviously hacky – user3F31A28 Apr 6 '14 at 15:28
  • @user3F31A28: a better test is probably #ifndef O_BINARY / #define O_BINARY 0 / #endif. If you've got to write code that does work on both Windows and Unix, then you probably have to do something like that. Last time I looked, a lot of the POSIX functions on Windows were only available prefixed with an underscore — _open(), _read(), _close(). I don't know whether <io.h> takes care of that mapping, or whether something else changed. At one level, I'm not too fussed. Mercifully, I don't have to 'do' Windows any more. – Jonathan Leffler Apr 6 '14 at 15:32
2

The question was updated...

The fread() loop is weird:

while ((len = fread(buf, 1, 1024, fp) > 0))
    println(len);

Look at the parentheses — they're equivalent to:

while ((len =   (fread(buf, 1, 1024, fp) > 0)   ))

Now, fread() will return the number of bytes read, but the value assigned to len will be 0 or 1, so the printing from println() should repeat 1 a few times and then stop.

Is that you're actual code, or did you make a typing error in creating the question?

Compile and run this program (I called it rd compiled from rd.c):

#include <stdio.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <fcntl.h>

#define FILENAME "file.ext"

static void println(int val)
{
    printf("%d\n", val);
}

int main(void)
{
    char buf[1024];
    int len;

    int id = open(FILENAME, 0);
    while ((len = read(id, buf, 1024)) > 0)
        println(len);
    close(id);

    FILE *fp = fopen(FILENAME, "rb");
    while ((len = fread(buf, 1, 1024, fp)) > 0)
        println(len);
    fclose(fp);

    struct stat sb;
    stat(FILENAME, &sb);
    printf("Size: %d\n", (int)sb.st_size);
    return 0;
}

Example output:

$ ls -l file.ext
-rw-r--r--  1 jleffler  staff  7305 Apr  6 08:08 file.ext
$ ./rd
1024
1024
1024
1024
1024
1024
1024
137
1024
1024
1024
1024
1024
1024
1024
137
Size: 7305
$
| improve this answer | |
  • Ok I have used the code in your example, it still outputs the wrong sizes, stopping way too early with 'read' – user3F31A28 Apr 6 '14 at 15:18
  • Jonathan, can you point out the important differences (if any) in your code? Eye-balling it, I don't see where your code works and the OP's does not. If it is the same at the essential points, it's the OP's environment. – usr2564301 Apr 6 '14 at 15:21
  • 1
    @Jongware: There are no essential differences (beyond ensuring that the same file name is used thrice). As usual, the problem is that we're not told the significant details — that the platform is not strictly POSIX compliant because read() on POSIX only works in 'binary mode'. But Windows is Windows and a law unto itself. The O_BINARY flag is not part of POSIX. I'd cry foul but it won't change anything. On POSIX systems, you can harmlessly use #ifndef O_BINARY / #define O_BINARY 0 / #endif, but you shouldn't have to and (strictly) O_ prefixes are reserved for the implementation. – Jonathan Leffler Apr 6 '14 at 15:29
  • Thanks. First thing I did was looking up POSIX read -- and common references indeed do not mention anything regarding "binary" or "text" mode. (Which may be why the OP got it wrong as well.) – usr2564301 Apr 6 '14 at 15:32

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