5

Java 8 is widely reported to have library support for unsigned integers. However, there seem to be no articles explaining how to use it and how much is possible.

Some functions like Integer.CompareUnsigned are easy enough to find and seem to do what one would expect. However, I fail to write even a simple loop that loops over all powers of two within the range of unsigned long.

int i = 0;
for(long l=1; (Long.compareUnsigned(l, Long.MAX_VALUE*2) < 0) && i<100; l+=l) {
    System.out.println(l);
    i++;
}

produces the output

1
2
4
8
...
1152921504606846976
2305843009213693952
4611686018427387904
-9223372036854775808
0
0
0
...
0

Am I missing something or are external libraries still required for this simple task?

0

2 Answers 2

6

If you're referring to

(Long.compareUnsigned(l, Long.MAX_VALUE*2) < 0)

l reaches

-9223372036854775808

unsigned it is

9223372036854775808

and

Long.MAX_VALUE*2

is

18446744073709551614

So l is smaller than Long.MAX_VALUE*2 in the unsigned world.

Assuming you're asking about the 0's

0
0
0
...
0

the problem (if you see it that way) is that, for long (other numerical primitives), the first bit is the sign bit.

so

10000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000

is

-9223372036854775808

When you do

-9223372036854775808 + -9223372036854775808

you underflow (overflow?) since

    10000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000
+   10000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000

is

00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000

which is 0. On later loop iterations, 0 + 0 remains 0.

4
  • That makes sense. So what is the correct way to terminate this loop? Apr 7, 2014 at 5:01
  • (Long.compareUnsigned(l, 4611686018427387904l*4) != 0) seems to work, but is there a more obvious way? Apr 7, 2014 at 5:06
  • @Jannis Are you just looking to get the last value 18446744073709551614? Apr 7, 2014 at 5:10
  • At this point I'm mostly wondering how to write that last value as a constant (l suffix obviously isn't enough since that is for signed integers). But that's out of the scope of the original question, so I'll mark this as the answer. Apr 7, 2014 at 5:22
4

The only problem here is that you're printing l as a signed integer. You can use Integer.toUnsignedString to get the results you're expecting:

int i = 0;
byte[] tmp = new byte[9];
for(int l=1; (Long.compareUnsigned(l, Long.MAX_VALUE*2) < 0) && i<100; l+=l) {
    System.out.println(Integer.toUsignedString(l)); // <== MODIFIED THIS LINE
    i++;
}
5
  • Since l can never be greater than Long.MAX_VALUE*2, I suspect the loop will never terminate either. Apr 7, 2014 at 4:42
  • 1
    @JoachimIsaksson - There's a && i<100 clause in there too. But yeah, I assumed the OP would understand that int and long aren't the same thing. If not, then Sotirios' answer clarifies that.
    – DaoWen
    Apr 7, 2014 at 4:46
  • That fixed the output of the last correct number, but after that I still get only 0 Apr 7, 2014 at 4:51
  • @JoachimIsaksson The int was a copy paste error, l is supposed to be of type long. The i<100 clause guarantees that the loop terminates, since l get's stuck on 0 Apr 7, 2014 at 4:52
  • @JannisFroese - I think Sotirios did a good job of explaining why your loop bound doesn't work. If you want the loop to stop once l overflows the range of an unsigned long, why don't you just change it to for(long l=1; l!=0; l+=l)? On another note, you should never use l as a variable name because it looks way too much like a 1!
    – DaoWen
    Apr 7, 2014 at 5:16

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