-10

This question already has an answer here:

I was going through K&R C book and got through this --> operator in the precedence table. So, I wondered if there was a similar operator i.e., <-- and wrote the following program:

#include<stdio.h>
void main()
{
   int x = 5;
   while(0 <-- x)
       printf("%d",x);
}

It worked perfectly fine. So why isn't <-- is not considered as an operator? (as it is not in the precedence table!) and what is it's precedence?

marked as duplicate by haccks, Natan Streppel, Robert Harvey Apr 7 '14 at 16:35

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • Where you find that table? Let us know about that. – haccks Apr 7 '14 at 16:36
  • Sorry mistake thought it was --> but it is -> :3 – Pruthvi Raj Apr 7 '14 at 16:37
  • In addition to <--, you can also extend the length of the arrow: <-------- or ------> etc – Aaron Franke Jan 27 at 23:45
7

--> is not one operator, it is two; (post) decrement and less than. C is whitespace agnostic for the most part, so:

x --> y
/* is the same as */
x-- > y

<-- is the same idea:

x <-- y
/* is the same as */
x < --y

Perhaps you are confusing -> with -->. -> dereferences a pointer to get at a member of the type it refers to.

typedef struct
{
    int x;
} foo;

int main(void)
{
    foo f = {1};
    foo *fp = &f;
    printf("%d", fp->x);
    return 0;
}

<- is simply not an operator at all.

  • Yeah got it thanks – Pruthvi Raj Apr 7 '14 at 16:40
2

This is not an operator but two operators: < and --. The code is identical to

#include<stdio.h>
void main()
{
   int x = 5;
   while(0 < --x)
       printf("%d",x);
}
  • if it isn't an aoperator , why is it listed in K&R C precedence table? – Pruthvi Raj Apr 7 '14 at 16:33
  • 3
    @PruthviRaj: It's not. Did you mean -> which dereferences a pointer? – Ed S. Apr 7 '14 at 16:35
  • Oops! my bad then i thought it was --> :3 – Pruthvi Raj Apr 7 '14 at 16:36
2

As I see it, that is just a "less than" < operator followed by decreasing the variable x (--). It is not one operator, but two. And -- has precedence over <.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.