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Is there any built in way of doing brute-force feature selection in scikit-learn, i.e. exhaustively evaluate all possible combinations of the input features, and then find the best subset? I am familiar with the "Recursive feature elimination" class but I am specifically interesting in evaluating all possible combinations of the input features one after the other.

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  • 1
    @AbhishekThakur Thanks. but No, I want a "stupid" brute-force feature selection -- actually I can do it in a loop over all combinations . But prefer a built in method/pipeline if such exists??
    – Dov
    Apr 9, 2014 at 10:19

3 Answers 3

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No, best subset selection is not implemented. The easiest way to do it is to write it yourself. This should get you started:

from itertools import chain, combinations
from sklearn.cross_validation import cross_val_score

def best_subset_cv(estimator, X, y, cv=3):
    n_features = X.shape[1]
    subsets = chain.from_iterable(combinations(xrange(k), k + 1)
                                  for k in xrange(n_features))

    best_score = -np.inf
    best_subset = None
    for subset in subsets:
        score = cross_val_score(estimator, X[:, subset], y, cv=cv).mean()
        if score > best_score:
            best_score, best_subset = score, subset

    return best_subset, best_score

This performs k-fold cross-validation inside the loop, so it will fit k 2 estimators when giving data with p features.

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  • 3
    There's an error in the code. It should be combinations(xrange(n_features)).
    – nopper
    May 6, 2014 at 18:13
  • Performance tip - when comparing between different models of the same size k it is unnecessary to perform cv - it is enough to compare a train-set statistic such as R^2. Only when comparing best candidates of different sizes cv is necessary. See chapter 6 in this excellent book: www-bcf.usc.edu/~gareth/ISL
    – ihadanny
    Dec 24, 2015 at 14:48
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    also, for sklearn 0.22 you must slice the input like this: X.iloc[:, list(subset)]
    – jimijazz
    Feb 22, 2018 at 14:54
  • Modern (Nov 2022) usage requires from sklearn.model_selection import cross_val_score.
    – jasmyace
    Nov 12, 2022 at 15:52
7

Combining the answer of Fred Foo and the comments of nopper, ihadanny and jimijazz, the following code gets the same results as the R function regsubsets() (part of the leaps library) for the first example in Lab 1 (6.5.1 Best Subset Selection) in the book "An Introduction to Statistical Learning with Applications in R".

from itertools import combinations
from sklearn.cross_validation import cross_val_score

def best_subset(estimator, X, y, max_size=8, cv=5):
'''Calculates the best model of up to max_size features of X.
   estimator must have a fit and score functions.
   X must be a DataFrame.'''

    n_features = X.shape[1]
    subsets = (combinations(range(n_features), k + 1) 
               for k in range(min(n_features, max_size)))

    best_size_subset = []
    for subsets_k in subsets:  # for each list of subsets of the same size
        best_score = -np.inf
        best_subset = None
        for subset in subsets_k: # for each subset
            estimator.fit(X.iloc[:, list(subset)], y)
            # get the subset with the best score among subsets of the same size
            score = estimator.score(X.iloc[:, list(subset)], y)
            if score > best_score:
                best_score, best_subset = score, subset
        # to compare subsets of different sizes we must use CV
        # first store the best subset of each size
        best_size_subset.append(best_subset)

    # compare best subsets of each size
    best_score = -np.inf
    best_subset = None
    list_scores = []
    for subset in best_size_subset:
        score = cross_val_score(estimator, X.iloc[:, list(subset)], y, cv=cv).mean()
        list_scores.append(score)
        if score > best_score:
            best_score, best_subset = score, subset

    return best_subset, best_score, best_size_subset, list_scores

See notebook at http://nbviewer.jupyter.org/github/pedvide/ISLR_Python/blob/master/Chapter6_Linear_Model_Selection_and_Regularization.ipynb#6.5.1-Best-Subset-Selection

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You might want to take a look at MLxtend's Exhaustive Feature Selector. It is obviously not built into scikit-learn (yet?) but does support its classifier and regressor objects.

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