146

What is the best way to generate a long string quickly in ruby? This works, but is very slow:

str = ""
length = 100000
(1..length).each {|i| str += "0"}

I've also noticed that creating a string of a decent length and then appending that to an existing string up to the desired length works much faster:

str = ""
incrementor = ""
length = 100000
(1..1000).each {|i| incrementor += "0"}
(1..100).each {|i| str += incrementor}

Any other suggestions?

1
  • 1
    The best way would be to use JRuby and use StringBuffer. Oooooh. Commented Feb 19, 2010 at 14:35

2 Answers 2

326
str = "0" * 999999
3
  • 22
    Indeed, very weird, look how different and elegant looks in Python: str = "0" * 999999 ;)
    – tokland
    Commented Nov 16, 2016 at 19:38
  • 1
    Why is the order important with Ruby? When I do 99999 * "0" I get TypeError: String can't be coerced into Fixnum
    – Steven
    Commented Jan 14, 2017 at 22:30
  • 17
    @Steven From Ruby's perspective, "0" * 999999 is treated as "0".*(999999) where * is a method in the String class. That method accepts numbers as valid arguments to perform string replication. When you reverse the expression, we get 999999.*("0"). Now we are talking about the * method in the FixNum class, and that method refuses to take strings as arguments. It certainly could (for example, automatically making a best-effort to convert the argument to a FixNum) but the language designers decided against embracing Ruby's Perlish inspirations too fully.
    – FMc
    Commented Jan 15, 2017 at 2:12
11

Another relatively quick option is

str = '%0999999d' % 0

Though benchmarking

require 'benchmark'
Benchmark.bm(9)  do |x|
  x.report('format  :') { '%099999999d' % 0 }
  x.report('multiply:') { '0' * 99999999 }
end

Shows that multiplication is still faster

               user     system      total        real
format  :  0.300000   0.080000   0.380000 (  0.405345)
multiply:  0.080000   0.080000   0.160000 (  0.172504)
2
  • I like this answer, but I can't seem to get it to work for anything other than '0'. What do I do if I want 100 r's? Commented Mar 26, 2014 at 16:25
  • 2
    It won't work with other symbols because it's taking advantage of number padding in format strings. Numbers can be padded with 0's in front or back (for decimals) without changing the value, r's don't work like that.
    – Andrew
    Commented Jun 19, 2014 at 23:44

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