22

I would like to declare a base class that all other schema objects can inherit from, for example:

class Base(db.Model):
    created_on = db.Column(db.DateTime, default=db.func.now())
    updated_on = db.Column(db.DateTime, default=db.func.now(), onupdate=db.func.now())

Then all other schema objects can inherit from it and not have to repeat the declaration of the two columns.

How would I do this in Flask-SQLAlchemy?

from flask.ext.sqlalchemy import SQLAlchemy
db = SQLAlchemy(app)

class User(db.Model):
    __tablename__ = 'users'
    id = db.Column(db.Integer, primary_key = True)
    email = db.Column(db.String(255), unique = True)
69

SQLAlchemy offers a directive called __abstract__. You can use it to tell SQLAlchemy not to create the table for a particular model. That model can be used as your base class.

from flask.ext.sqlalchemy import SQLAlchemy
db = SQLAlchemy(app)

class Base(db.Model):
    __abstract__ = True

    created_on = db.Column(db.DateTime, default=db.func.now())
    updated_on = db.Column(db.DateTime, default=db.func.now(), onupdate=db.func.now())


class User(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'users'
    id = db.Column(db.Integer, primary_key = True)
    email = db.Column(db.String(255), unique = True)
5
  • 2
    This does the trick. Also, to simplify things a bit, you can remove the __tablename__ in the children and instead add to the parent: @declared_attr def __tablename__(cls): return cls.__name__.lower() – HostedMetrics.com Jun 4 '15 at 15:06
  • 2
    @Heliodor That would just be the default behavior you'd get without the __tablename__ at all. __tablename__ was specified because the OP wanted it to be plural users rather than singular user. – pydsigner Jul 30 '16 at 5:42
  • Thanks @siulkilulki. Updated. – dirn Nov 26 '16 at 16:24
  • 1
    @Heliodor, I tried @declared_attr def __tablename__(cls): return cls.__name__.lower() + 's' in the base class to pluralize, but it didn't work. Any tips? – Gringo Suave Jun 8 '17 at 19:17

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