365

I'd like to get the names of all the keys in a MongoDB collection.

For example, from this:

db.things.insert( { type : ['dog', 'cat'] } );
db.things.insert( { egg : ['cat'] } );
db.things.insert( { type : [] } );
db.things.insert( { hello : []  } );

I'd like to get the unique keys:

type, egg, hello

23 Answers 23

381

You could do this with MapReduce:

mr = db.runCommand({
  "mapreduce" : "my_collection",
  "map" : function() {
    for (var key in this) { emit(key, null); }
  },
  "reduce" : function(key, stuff) { return null; }, 
  "out": "my_collection" + "_keys"
})

Then run distinct on the resulting collection so as to find all the keys:

db[mr.result].distinct("_id")
["foo", "bar", "baz", "_id", ...]
11
  • 3
    Hi there! I've just posted a follow-up to this question asking how to make this snippet work even with keys located at deeper levels into the data structure (stackoverflow.com/questions/2997004/…). Jun 8, 2010 at 14:53
  • 1
    @kristina : How is it possible that I get entire things listed with the keys when using this on the things collection. It looks related to the history mechanism because I get things which I have modified in the past..
    – Shawn
    Sep 26, 2011 at 2:54
  • 3
    I know this is an old thread, but I seem to have a similar need. I'm using the nodejs mongodb native driver. The resulting temporary collection seems to empty always. I'm using the mapreduce function in the collection class for this. Is that not possible?
    – Deepak
    May 22, 2014 at 14:15
  • 7
    This may be obvious, but if you want to get a list of all the unique keys in a subdocument, just modify this line: for (var key in this.first_level.second_level.nth_level) { emit(key, null); }
    – dtbarne
    Jan 7, 2016 at 22:51
  • 4
    Instead of saving to a collection then running distinct on that, I use map(): db.runCommand({..., out: { "inline" : 1 }}).results.map(function(i) { return i._id; }); Mar 3, 2017 at 14:01
228
+200

With Kristina's answer as inspiration, I created an open source tool called Variety which does exactly this: https://github.com/variety/variety

1
  • 17
    This is a fantastic tool, congratulations. It does exactly what the question asks, and can be configured with limits, depth etc. Recommended by any who follows. Jun 10, 2012 at 20:35
139

You can use aggregation with the new $objectToArray aggregation operator in version 3.4.4 to convert all top key-value pairs into document arrays, followed by $unwind and $group with $addToSet to get distinct keys across the entire collection. (Use $$ROOT for referencing the top level document.)

db.things.aggregate([
  {"$project":{"arrayofkeyvalue":{"$objectToArray":"$$ROOT"}}},
  {"$unwind":"$arrayofkeyvalue"},
  {"$group":{"_id":null,"allkeys":{"$addToSet":"$arrayofkeyvalue.k"}}}
])

You can use the following query for getting keys in a single document.

db.things.aggregate([
  {"$match":{_id: "<<ID>>"}}, /* Replace with the document's ID */
  {"$project":{"arrayofkeyvalue":{"$objectToArray":"$$ROOT"}}},
  {"$project":{"keys":"$arrayofkeyvalue.k"}}
])
6
  • 28
    This is really the best answer. Solves the issue without involving some other programming language or package, and works with all drivers that support the aggregate framework (even Meteor!) Nov 16, 2017 at 21:48
  • 2
    If you want to return an array rather than a cursor containing a single map entry with an "allkeys" key, you can append .next()["allkeys"] to the command (assuming the collection has at least one element).
    – M. Justin
    Apr 9, 2020 at 22:09
  • I would just note that aggregate from @kristina answer takes 11 sec on my set, and Map Recude 2 sec). I did not expect that.
    – seven
    Jul 13, 2020 at 13:20
  • 1
    This worked for me on a collection with millions of documents where the map reduce timed out. Jul 19, 2021 at 21:45
  • I vote for this too.. It's native afterall... Sep 17, 2021 at 17:29
21

A cleaned up and reusable solution using pymongo:

from pymongo import MongoClient
from bson import Code

def get_keys(db, collection):
    client = MongoClient()
    db = client[db]
    map = Code("function() { for (var key in this) { emit(key, null); } }")
    reduce = Code("function(key, stuff) { return null; }")
    result = db[collection].map_reduce(map, reduce, "myresults")
    return result.distinct('_id')

Usage:

get_keys('dbname', 'collection')
>> ['key1', 'key2', ... ]
3
  • 2
    Works great. Finally got my problem solved....this is the simplest solution i saw in stack overflow.. Jul 9, 2019 at 13:10
  • And to filter by type, just add e.g. if (typeof(this[key]) == 'number') before emit(key, null). Jan 12, 2020 at 22:31
  • Note: using MongoDB free tier, I get errror pymongo.errors.OperationFailure: CMD_NOT_ALLOWED: mapReduce, full error: {'ok': 0, 'errmsg': 'CMD_NOT_ALLOWED: mapReduce', 'code': 8000, 'codeName': 'AtlasError'} apparently because mapReduce is not supported in free tier MongoDB unsupported-commands
    – curtisp
    May 31, 2021 at 17:49
19

If your target collection is not too large, you can try this under mongo shell client:

var allKeys = {};

db.YOURCOLLECTION.find().forEach(function(doc){Object.keys(doc).forEach(function(key){allKeys[key]=1})});

allKeys;
4
  • here how i can give regExp for particular keys if i want to see?
    – TB.M
    Mar 24, 2017 at 5:41
  • @TB.M you can try this: db.configs.find().forEach(function(doc){Object.keys(doc).forEach(function(key){ if (/YOURREGEXP/.test(key)) {allKeys[key]=1}})});
    – Li Chunlin
    Mar 27, 2017 at 4:22
  • what does test mean here? can u please explain?
    – TB.M
    Mar 27, 2017 at 6:03
17

If you are using mongodb 3.4.4 and above then you can use below aggregation using $objectToArray and $group aggregation

db.collection.aggregate([
  { "$project": {
    "data": { "$objectToArray": "$$ROOT" }
  }},
  { "$project": { "data": "$data.k" }},
  { "$unwind": "$data" },
  { "$group": {
    "_id": null,
    "keys": { "$addToSet": "$data" }
  }}
])

Here is the working example

1
  • This is the best answer. You can also use $match at the beginning of the aggregation pipeline to only get the keys of documents that match a condition(s). Aug 27, 2019 at 18:21
13

Try this:

doc=db.thinks.findOne();
for (key in doc) print(key);
7
  • 58
    incorrect answer since this only outputs fields for a single document in a collection - the others may all have completely different keys. Mar 31, 2014 at 23:41
  • 17
    It is still the most useful answer to me, being a simple reasonable minimum. Jul 31, 2014 at 16:13
  • 12
    It's not useful? How is it useful if it gives you the wrong answer?
    – Zlatko
    Jun 27, 2015 at 7:48
  • 4
    The context show what is usefull: if data is normalized (ex. origen from CSV file), it is useful... For data imported from SQL is useful. Sep 22, 2015 at 10:17
  • 5
    it is not a good answer it's an answer on how to get keys of one element in the collection not all keys in the collection!
    – yonatan
    Jan 7, 2016 at 8:57
11

Using python. Returns the set of all top-level keys in the collection:

#Using pymongo and connection named 'db'

reduce(
    lambda all_keys, rec_keys: all_keys | set(rec_keys), 
    map(lambda d: d.keys(), db.things.find()), 
    set()
)
2
  • 1
    I've found this to work but how efficient is it compared to a raw mongod query? Jan 27, 2016 at 19:47
  • 2
    I'm quite sure this is extremely inefficient compared to doing this directly in Mongodb Jan 5, 2018 at 16:39
9

Here is the sample worked in Python: This sample returns the results inline.

from pymongo import MongoClient
from bson.code import Code

mapper = Code("""
    function() {
                  for (var key in this) { emit(key, null); }
               }
""")
reducer = Code("""
    function(key, stuff) { return null; }
""")

distinctThingFields = db.things.map_reduce(mapper, reducer
    , out = {'inline' : 1}
    , full_response = True)
## do something with distinctThingFields['results']
6

I think the best way do this as mentioned here is in mongod 3.4.4+ but without using the $unwind operator and using only two stages in the pipeline. Instead we can use the $mergeObjects and $objectToArray operators.

In the $group stage, we use the $mergeObjects operator to return a single document where key/value are from all documents in the collection.

Then comes the $project where we use $map and $objectToArray to return the keys.

let allTopLevelKeys =  [
    {
        "$group": {
            "_id": null,
            "array": {
                "$mergeObjects": "$$ROOT"
            }
        }
    },
    {
        "$project": {
            "keys": {
                "$map": {
                    "input": { "$objectToArray": "$array" },
                    "in": "$$this.k"
                }
            }
        }
    }
];

Now if we have a nested documents and want to get the keys as well, this is doable. For simplicity, let consider a document with simple embedded document that look like this:

{field1: {field2: "abc"}, field3: "def"}
{field1: {field3: "abc"}, field4: "def"}

The following pipeline yield all keys (field1, field2, field3, field4).

let allFistSecondLevelKeys = [
    {
        "$group": {
            "_id": null,
            "array": {
                "$mergeObjects": "$$ROOT"
            }
        }
    },
    {
        "$project": {
            "keys": {
                "$setUnion": [
                    {
                        "$map": {
                            "input": {
                                "$reduce": {
                                    "input": {
                                        "$map": {
                                            "input": {
                                                "$objectToArray": "$array"
                                            },
                                            "in": {
                                                "$cond": [
                                                    {
                                                        "$eq": [
                                                            {
                                                                "$type": "$$this.v"
                                                            },
                                                            "object"
                                                        ]
                                                    },
                                                    {
                                                        "$objectToArray": "$$this.v"
                                                    },
                                                    [
                                                        "$$this"
                                                    ]
                                                ]
                                            }
                                        }
                                    },
                                    "initialValue": [

                                    ],
                                    "in": {
                                        "$concatArrays": [
                                            "$$this",
                                            "$$value"
                                        ]
                                    }
                                }
                            },
                            "in": "$$this.k"
                        }
                    }
                ]
            }
        }
    }
]

With a little effort, we can get the key for all subdocument in an array field where the elements are object as well.

1
  • Yes $unwind will explode collection (no.of fields * no.of docs), we can avoid that by using $mergeObjects on all versions > 3.6.. Did the same, Should've seen this answer before, my life would've been easier that way (-_-) Feb 11, 2020 at 0:42
6

I am surprise, no one here has ans by using simple javascript and Set logic to automatically filter the duplicates values, simple example on mongo shellas below:

var allKeys = new Set()
db.collectionName.find().forEach( function (o) {for (key in o ) allKeys.add(key)})
for(let key of allKeys) print(key)

This will print all possible unique keys in the collection name: collectionName.

3

This works fine for me:

var arrayOfFieldNames = [];

var items = db.NAMECOLLECTION.find();

while(items.hasNext()) {
  var item = items.next();
  for(var index in item) {
    arrayOfFieldNames[index] = index;
   }
}

for (var index in arrayOfFieldNames) {
  print(index);
}
3

Maybe slightly off-topic, but you can recursively pretty-print all keys/fields of an object:

function _printFields(item, level) {
    if ((typeof item) != "object") {
        return
    }
    for (var index in item) {
        print(" ".repeat(level * 4) + index)
        if ((typeof item[index]) == "object") {
            _printFields(item[index], level + 1)
        }
    }
}

function printFields(item) {
    _printFields(item, 0)
}

Useful when all objects in a collection has the same structure.

2

I know I am late to the party, but if you want a quick solution in python finding all keys (even the nested ones) you could do with a recursive function:

def get_keys(dl, keys=None):
    keys = keys or []
    if isinstance(dl, dict):
        keys += dl.keys()
        list(map(lambda x: get_keys(x, keys), dl.values()))
    elif isinstance(dl, list):
        list(map(lambda x: get_keys(x, keys), dl))
    return list(set(keys))

and use it like:

dl = db.things.find_one({})
get_keys(dl)

if your documents do not have identical keys you can do:

dl = db.things.find({})
list(set(list(map(get_keys, dl))[0]))

but this solution can for sure be optimized.

Generally this solution is basically solving finding keys in nested dicts, so this is not mongodb specific.

2

To get a list of all the keys minus _id, consider running the following aggregate pipeline:

var keys = db.collection.aggregate([
    { "$project": {
       "hashmaps": { "$objectToArray": "$$ROOT" } 
    } }, 
    { "$group": {
        "_id": null,
        "fields": { "$addToSet": "$hashmaps.k" }
    } },
    { "$project": {
            "keys": {
                "$setDifference": [
                    {
                        "$reduce": {
                            "input": "$fields",
                            "initialValue": [],
                            "in": { "$setUnion" : ["$$value", "$$this"] }
                        }
                    },
                    ["_id"]
                ]
            }
        }
    }
]).toArray()[0]["keys"];
0
1

Based on @Wolkenarchitekt answer: https://stackoverflow.com/a/48117846/8808983, I write a script that can find patterns in all keys in the db and I think it can help others reading this thread:

"""
Python 3
This script get list of patterns and print the collections that contains fields with this patterns.
"""

import argparse

import pymongo
from bson import Code


# initialize mongo connection:
def get_db():
    client = pymongo.MongoClient("172.17.0.2")
    db = client["Data"]
    return db


def get_commandline_options():
    description = "To run use: python db_fields_pattern_finder.py -p <list_of_patterns>"
    parser = argparse.ArgumentParser(description=description)
    parser.add_argument('-p', '--patterns', nargs="+", help='List of patterns to look for in the db.', required=True)
    return parser.parse_args()


def report_matching_fields(relevant_fields_by_collection):
    print("Matches:")

    for collection_name in relevant_fields_by_collection:
        if relevant_fields_by_collection[collection_name]:
            print(f"{collection_name}: {relevant_fields_by_collection[collection_name]}")

    # pprint(relevant_fields_by_collection)


def get_collections_names(db):
    """
    :param pymongo.database.Database db:
    :return list: collections names
    """
    return db.list_collection_names()


def get_keys(db, collection):
    """
    See: https://stackoverflow.com/a/48117846/8808983
    :param db:
    :param collection:
    :return:
    """
    map = Code("function() { for (var key in this) { emit(key, null); } }")
    reduce = Code("function(key, stuff) { return null; }")
    result = db[collection].map_reduce(map, reduce, "myresults")
    return result.distinct('_id')


def get_fields(db, collection_names):
    fields_by_collections = {}
    for collection_name in collection_names:
        fields_by_collections[collection_name] = get_keys(db, collection_name)
    return fields_by_collections


def get_matches_fields(fields_by_collections, patterns):
    relevant_fields_by_collection = {}
    for collection_name in fields_by_collections:
        relevant_fields = [field for field in fields_by_collections[collection_name] if
                           [pattern for pattern in patterns if
                            pattern in field]]
        relevant_fields_by_collection[collection_name] = relevant_fields

    return relevant_fields_by_collection


def main(patterns):
    """
    :param list patterns: List of strings to look for in the db.
    """
    db = get_db()

    collection_names = get_collections_names(db)
    fields_by_collections = get_fields(db, collection_names)
    relevant_fields_by_collection = get_matches_fields(fields_by_collections, patterns)

    report_matching_fields(relevant_fields_by_collection)


if __name__ == '__main__':
    args = get_commandline_options()
    main(args.patterns)
0

As per the mongoldb documentation, a combination of distinct

Finds the distinct values for a specified field across a single collection or view and returns the results in an array.

and indexes collection operations are what would return all possible values for a given key, or index:

Returns an array that holds a list of documents that identify and describe the existing indexes on the collection

So in a given method one could do use a method like the following one, in order to query a collection for all it's registered indexes, and return, say an object with the indexes for keys (this example uses async/await for NodeJS, but obviously you could use any other asynchronous approach):

async function GetFor(collection, index) {

    let currentIndexes;
    let indexNames = [];
    let final = {};
    let vals = [];

    try {
        currentIndexes = await collection.indexes();
        await ParseIndexes();
        //Check if a specific index was queried, otherwise, iterate for all existing indexes
        if (index && typeof index === "string") return await ParseFor(index, indexNames);
        await ParseDoc(indexNames);
        await Promise.all(vals);
        return final;
    } catch (e) {
        throw e;
    }

    function ParseIndexes() {
        return new Promise(function (result) {
            let err;
            for (let ind in currentIndexes) {
                let index = currentIndexes[ind];
                if (!index) {
                    err = "No Key For Index "+index; break;
                }
                let Name = Object.keys(index.key);
                if (Name.length === 0) {
                    err = "No Name For Index"; break;
                }
                indexNames.push(Name[0]);
            }
            return result(err ? Promise.reject(err) : Promise.resolve());
        })
    }

    async function ParseFor(index, inDoc) {
        if (inDoc.indexOf(index) === -1) throw "No Such Index In Collection";
        try {
            await DistinctFor(index);
            return final;
        } catch (e) {
            throw e
        }
    }
    function ParseDoc(doc) {
        return new Promise(function (result) {
            let err;
            for (let index in doc) {
                let key = doc[index];
                if (!key) {
                    err = "No Key For Index "+index; break;
                }
                vals.push(new Promise(function (pushed) {
                    DistinctFor(key)
                        .then(pushed)
                        .catch(function (err) {
                            return pushed(Promise.resolve());
                        })
                }))
            }
            return result(err ? Promise.reject(err) : Promise.resolve());
        })
    }

    async function DistinctFor(key) {
        if (!key) throw "Key Is Undefined";
        try {
            final[key] = await collection.distinct(key);
        } catch (e) {
            final[key] = 'failed';
            throw e;
        }
    }
}

So querying a collection with the basic _id index, would return the following (test collection only has one document at the time of the test):

Mongo.MongoClient.connect(url, function (err, client) {
    assert.equal(null, err);

    let collection = client.db('my db').collection('the targeted collection');

    GetFor(collection, '_id')
        .then(function () {
            //returns
            // { _id: [ 5ae901e77e322342de1fb701 ] }
        })
        .catch(function (err) {
            //manage your error..
        })
});

Mind you, this uses methods native to the NodeJS Driver. As some other answers have suggested, there are other approaches, such as the aggregate framework. I personally find this approach more flexible, as you can easily create and fine-tune how to return the results. Obviously, this only addresses top-level attributes, not nested ones. Also, to guarantee that all documents are represented should there be secondary indexes (other than the main _id one), those indexes should be set as required.

0

We can achieve this by Using mongo js file. Add below code in your getCollectionName.js file and run js file in the console of Linux as given below :

mongo --host 192.168.1.135 getCollectionName.js

db_set = connect("192.168.1.135:27017/database_set_name"); // for Local testing
// db_set.auth("username_of_db", "password_of_db"); // if required

db_set.getMongo().setSlaveOk();

var collectionArray = db_set.getCollectionNames();

collectionArray.forEach(function(collectionName){

    if ( collectionName == 'system.indexes' || collectionName == 'system.profile' || collectionName == 'system.users' ) {
        return;
    }

    print("\nCollection Name = "+collectionName);
    print("All Fields :\n");

    var arrayOfFieldNames = []; 
    var items = db_set[collectionName].find();
    // var items = db_set[collectionName].find().sort({'_id':-1}).limit(100); // if you want fast & scan only last 100 records of each collection
    while(items.hasNext()) {
        var item = items.next(); 
        for(var index in item) {
            arrayOfFieldNames[index] = index;
        }
    }
    for (var index in arrayOfFieldNames) {
        print(index);
    }

});

quit();

Thanks @ackuser

0

Following the thread from @James Cropcho's answer, I landed on the following which I found to be super easy to use. It is a binary tool, which is exactly what I was looking for: mongoeye.

Using this tool it took about 2 minutes to get my schema exported from command line.

0

I know this question is 10 years old but there is no C# solution and this took me hours to figure out. I'm using the .NET driver and System.Linq to return a list of the keys.

var map = new BsonJavaScript("function() { for (var key in this) { emit(key, null); } }");
var reduce = new BsonJavaScript("function(key, stuff) { return null; }");
var options = new MapReduceOptions<BsonDocument, BsonDocument>();
var result = await collection.MapReduceAsync(map, reduce, options);
var list = result.ToEnumerable().Select(item => item["_id"].ToString());
-1

I extended Carlos LM's solution a bit so it's more detailed.

Example of a schema:

var schema = {
    _id: 123,
    id: 12,
    t: 'title',
    p: 4.5,
    ls: [{
            l: 'lemma',
            p: {
                pp: 8.9
            }
        },
         {
            l: 'lemma2',
            p: {
               pp: 8.3
           }
        }
    ]
};

Type into the console:

var schemafy = function(schema, i, limit) {
    var i = (typeof i !== 'undefined') ? i : 1;
    var limit = (typeof limit !== 'undefined') ? limit : false;
    var type = '';
    var array = false;

    for (key in schema) {
        type = typeof schema[key];
        array = (schema[key] instanceof Array) ? true : false;

        if (type === 'object') {
            print(Array(i).join('    ') + key+' <'+((array) ? 'array' : type)+'>:');
            schemafy(schema[key], i+1, array);
        } else {
            print(Array(i).join('    ') + key+' <'+type+'>');
        }

        if (limit) {
            break;
        }
    }
}

Run:

schemafy(db.collection.findOne());

Output

_id <number>
id <number>
t <string>
p <number>
ls <object>:
    0 <object>:
    l <string>
    p <object>:
        pp <number> 
1
  • 3
    his answer is wrong and you built on top of it. the whole point is to output all the fields of all the documents, not the first document which may have different fields than each next one. Mar 31, 2014 at 23:43
-1

I was trying to write in nodejs and finally came up with this:

db.collection('collectionName').mapReduce(
function() {
    for (var key in this) {
        emit(key, null);
    }
},
function(key, stuff) {
    return null;
}, {
    "out": "allFieldNames"
},
function(err, results) {
    var fields = db.collection('allFieldNames').distinct('_id');
    fields
        .then(function(data) {
            var finalData = {
                "status": "success",
                "fields": data
            };
            res.send(finalData);
            delteCollection(db, 'allFieldNames');
        })
        .catch(function(err) {
            res.send(err);
            delteCollection(db, 'allFieldNames');
        });
 });

After reading the newly created collection "allFieldNames", delete it.

db.collection("allFieldNames").remove({}, function (err,result) {
     db.close();
     return; 
});
-3

I have 1 simpler work around...

What you can do is while inserting data/document into your main collection "things" you must insert the attributes in 1 separate collection lets say "things_attributes".

so every time you insert in "things", you do get from "things_attributes" compare values of that document with your new document keys if any new key present append it in that document and again re-insert it.

So things_attributes will have only 1 document of unique keys which you can easily get when ever you require by using findOne()

1
  • For databases with many entries where queries for all keys are frequent and inserts are infrequent, caching the result of the "get all keys" query would make sense. This is one way to do that.
    – Him
    Apr 2, 2019 at 15:51

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