4

My understanding was that concurrent.futures relied on pickling arguments to get them running in different processes (or threads). Shouldn't pickling create a copy of the argument? On Linux it does not seem to be doing so, i.e., I have to explicitly pass a copy.

I'm trying to make sense of the following results:

<0> rands before submission: [17, 72, 97, 8, 32, 15, 63, 97, 57, 60]
<1> rands before submission: [97, 15, 97, 32, 60, 17, 57, 72, 8, 63]
<2> rands before submission: [15, 57, 63, 17, 97, 97, 8, 32, 60, 72]
<3> rands before submission: [32, 97, 63, 72, 17, 57, 97, 8, 15, 60]
in function 0 [97, 15, 97, 32, 60, 17, 57, 72, 8, 63]
in function 1 [97, 32, 17, 15, 57, 97, 63, 72, 60, 8]
in function 2 [97, 32, 17, 15, 57, 97, 63, 72, 60, 8]
in function 3 [97, 32, 17, 15, 57, 97, 63, 72, 60, 8]

Here's the code:

from __future__ import print_function
import time
import random
try:
    from concurrent import futures
except ImportError:
    import futures


def work_with_rands(i, rands):
    print('in function', i, rands)


def main():
    random.seed(1)
    rands = [random.randrange(100) for _ in range(10)]

    # sequence 1 and sequence 2 should give the same results but they don't
    # only difference is that one uses a copy of rands (i.e., rands.copy())
    # sequence 1
    with futures.ProcessPoolExecutor() as ex:
        for i in range(4):
            print("<{}> rands before submission: {}".format(i, rands))
            ex.submit(work_with_rands, i, rands)
            random.shuffle(rands)

    print('-' * 30)
    random.seed(1)
    rands = [random.randrange(100) for _ in range(10)]
    # sequence 2
    print("initial sequence: ", rands)
    with futures.ProcessPoolExecutor() as ex:
        for i in range(4):
            print("<{}> rands before submission: {}".format(i, rands))
            ex.submit(work_with_rands, i, rands[:])
            random.shuffle(rands)

if __name__ == "__main__":
    main()

Where on earth is [97, 32, 17, 15, 57, 97, 63, 72, 60, 8] coming from? That's not even one of the sequences passed to submit.

The results differ slightly under Python 2.

1
+100

Basically, ProcessPoolExecutor.submit() method put function and its arguments to some "Work Items" dict (without any pickling), that is shared with another thread (_queue_management_worker), and that thread passes WorkItems from that dict to queue that is read by actual worker process.

There is a comment in source code, describing the concurrent module architecture: http://hg.python.org/cpython/file/16207b8495bf/Lib/concurrent/futures/process.py#l6

It turns out, that there is not enough time for _queue_management_worker to get notified about new items between submit calls.

So, that thread waits here all the time: (http://hg.python.org/cpython/file/16207b8495bf/Lib/concurrent/futures/process.py#l226) and only wakes on ProcessPoolExecutor.shutdown (on exit from ProcessPoolExecutor context).

If you put some delay in your first sequence, like that:

with futures.ProcessPoolExecutor() as ex:
    for i in range(4):
        print("<{}> rands before submission: {}".format(i, rands))
        ex.submit(work_with_rands, i, rands)
        random.shuffle(rands)
        time.sleep(0.01)

you will see, that _queue_management_worker will wake up and pass calls to worker processes, and work_with_rands will print different values.

1

you share the same list on all threads and its mutated. its hard to debug because when you add a print it will behave differently. but this [97, 32, 17, 15, 57, 97, 63, 72, 60, 8] must be a state inside shuffle. shuffle holds the list (the same list that exists in all threads) and changes it more than once. at the time the threads are called the state is [97, 32, 17, 15, 57, 97, 63, 72, 60, 8]. The values don't get copied immanently, they are copied in another thread so you can't guarantee when they will be copied.

An example of what shuffle produces before the shuffle is done:

[31, 64, 88, 7, 68, 85, 69, 3, 15, 47] # initial value (rands)
# ex.submit() is called here
# shuffle() is called here
# shuffle starts changing rand to:
[31, 64, 88, 47, 68, 85, 69, 3, 15, 7]
[31, 64, 15, 47, 68, 85, 69, 3, 88, 7]
[31, 64, 15, 47, 68, 85, 69, 3, 88, 7]
[31, 64, 69, 47, 68, 85, 15, 3, 88, 7]
[31, 64, 85, 47, 68, 69, 15, 3, 88, 7] # threads may be called here
[31, 64, 85, 47, 68, 69, 15, 3, 88, 7] # or here
[31, 64, 85, 47, 68, 69, 15, 3, 88, 7] # or here
[31, 85, 64, 47, 68, 69, 15, 3, 88, 7]
[85, 31, 64, 47, 68, 69, 15, 3, 88, 7] # value when the shuffle has finished

shuffle source code:

def shuffle(self, x, random=None):
    if random is None:
        randbelow = self._randbelow
        for i in reversed(range(1, len(x))):
            # pick an element in x[:i+1] with which to exchange x[i]
            j = randbelow(i+1)
            x[i], x[j] = x[j], x[i]
            # added this print here. that's what prints the output above
            # your threads are probably being called when this is still pending
            print(x) 
     ... other staff here

so if your input is [17, 72, 97, 8, 32, 15, 63, 97, 57, 60] and your output is [97, 15, 97, 32, 60, 17, 57, 72, 8, 63] the shuffle has "steps in the middle between that". your threads get called in the "steps in the middle"

An example without mutation, in general try to avoid sharing data between threads because its really hard to get it right:

def work_with_rands(i, rands):
    print('in function', i, rands)


def foo(a):
    random.seed(random.randrange(999912)/9)
    x = [None]*len(a)
    for i in a:
        _rand = random.randrange(len(a))

        while x[_rand] is not None:
            _rand = random.randrange(len(a))

        x[_rand] = i
    return x

def main():
    rands = [random.randrange(100) for _ in range(10)]
    with futures.ProcessPoolExecutor() as ex:
        for i in range(4):
            new_rands = foo(rands)
            print("<{}> rands before submission: {}".format(i, new_rands ))
            ex.submit(work_with_rands, i, new_rands )


<0> rands before submission: [84, 12, 93, 47, 40, 53, 74, 38, 52, 62]
<1> rands before submission: [74, 53, 93, 12, 38, 47, 52, 40, 84, 62]
<2> rands before submission: [84, 12, 93, 38, 62, 52, 53, 74, 47, 40]
<3> rands before submission: [53, 62, 52, 12, 84, 47, 93, 40, 74, 38]
in function 0 [84, 12, 93, 47, 40, 53, 74, 38, 52, 62]
in function 1 [74, 53, 93, 12, 38, 47, 52, 40, 84, 62]
in function 2 [84, 12, 93, 38, 62, 52, 53, 74, 47, 40]
in function 3 [53, 62, 52, 12, 84, 47, 93, 40, 74, 38]
  • I have a solution (the explicit copy). I'm just perplexed about the result I'm getting (1) why it doesn't make a copy when it pickles, if it is pickling and (2) where is [97, 32, 17, 15, 57, 97, 63, 72, 60, 8] coming from. – ariddell Apr 10 '14 at 23:00
  • it comes from shuffle, shuffle mutates the list multiple times until the shuffle is actually done, i updated the answer to explain it might have been confusing – Foo Bar User Apr 10 '14 at 23:19
  • My reading of the docs is that there is no shared data, i.e., that each argument is pickled and sent separately. That's the source of my confusion and what prompted the question. – ariddell Apr 11 '14 at 0:08
  • it think it works like this: ex.submit() creates a worker and adds it in a queue. a thread is maintaining the queue (start process / remove process). when the thread "decides" its time to call the process it does. and it looks like that point is when the shuffling is pending. but i am not 100% sure – Foo Bar User Apr 11 '14 at 22:22
  • That makes sense! If you put this in an answer I'll mark it as correct faute de mieux. – ariddell Apr 11 '14 at 22:34

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