105

Is there a more syntactically concise way of writing the following?

gen = (i for i in xrange(10))
index = 5
for i, v in enumerate(gen):
    if i is index:
        return v

It seems almost natural that a generator should have a gen[index] expression, that acts as a list, but is functionally identical to the above code.

6
  • 16
    You don't want is in this situation (or many situations at all). is is for comparing identity, not equality. You want ==. This will probably work in this instance, but only by coincidence and implementation detail. Commented Feb 20, 2010 at 6:15
  • 1
    Since I'm using integers, how could it not work? Is it even good practice to expect the index object to implement __eq__ in cases such as this? (This is getting off topic...) Commented Feb 20, 2010 at 8:34
  • 2
    Try 1000 is 500 + 500, it will (probably) be False. See, for example, stackoverflow.com/questions/306313/… Commented Feb 20, 2010 at 8:49
  • 2
    +1 for this question. It does seem strange that there's not a less verbose way to say "the nth result of gen".
    – LarsH
    Commented Oct 18, 2013 at 1:39
  • Another possibility is zippers --- they handle arbitrary trees, but a list is a tree too. See this implementation github.com/trivio/zipper/blob/master/tests/test_zipper.py
    – Reb.Cabin
    Commented Jul 6, 2017 at 20:52

10 Answers 10

107

one method would be to use itertools.islice

>>> gen = (x for x in range(10))
>>> index = 5
>>> next(itertools.islice(gen, index, None))
5
0
21

I think the best way is :

next(x for i,x in enumerate(it) if i==n)

(where it is your iterator and n is the index)

It doesn't require you to add an import (like the solutions using itertools) nor to load all the elements of the iterator in memory at once (like the solutions using list).

Note 1: this version throws a StopIteration error if your iterator has less than n items. If you want to get None instead, you can use :

next((x for i,x in enumerate(it) if i==n), None)

Note 2: There are no brackets inside the call to next. This is not a list comprehension, but a generator comprehension, that does not consume the original iterator further than its nth element.

0
17

You could do this, using count as an example generator:

from itertools import islice, count
next(islice(count(), n, n+1))
4
  • What version of Python is this? The above code gives me the error AttributeError: 'itertools.islice' object has no attribute 'next' in 3.3.
    – LarsH
    Commented Oct 18, 2013 at 1:37
  • In Python 3x, change next to __next__(), i.e., islice(count, n, n=1).__next__()
    – Mohammed
    Commented Dec 18, 2015 at 0:44
  • 2
    So it's better to use next(islice(count(), n, n+1)). Commented Jan 7, 2016 at 6:25
  • 1
    I think you can get rid of the upper bound, i.e. next(islice(count(), n, None)).
    – user76284
    Commented Jul 2, 2020 at 20:40
12

I'd argue against the temptation to treat generators like lists. The simple but naive approach is the simple one-liner:

gen = (i for i in range(10))
list(gen)[3]

But remember, generators aren't like lists. They don't store their intermediate results anywhere, so you can't go backwards. I'll demonstrate the problem with a simple example in the python repl:

>>> gen = (i for i in range(10))
>>> list(gen)[3]
3
>>> list(gen)[3]
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
IndexError: list index out of range

Once you start going through a generator to get the nth value in the sequence, the generator is now in a different state, and attempting to get the nth value again will return you a different result, which is likely to result in a bug in your code.

Let's take a look at another example, based on the code from the question.

One would initially expect the following to print 4 twice.

gen = (i for i in range(10))
index = 4
for i, v in enumerate(gen):
    if i == index:
        answer = v
        break
print(answer)
for i, v in enumerate(gen):
    if i == index:
        answer = v
        break
print(answer)

but type this into the repl and you get:

>>> gen = (i for i in range(10))
>>> index = 4
>>> for i, v in enumerate(gen):
...     if i == index:
...             answer = v
...             break
... 
>>> print(answer)
4
>>> for i, v in enumerate(gen):
...     if i == index:
...             answer = v
...             break
... 
>>> print(answer)
9

Good luck tracing that bug down.


As pointed out, if the generator is infinitely long, you can't even convert it to a list. The expression list(gen) will never finish.

There is a way you could put a lazily evaluated caching wrapper around an infinite generator to make it look like an infinitely long list you could index into at will, but that deserves its own question and answer, and would have major performance implications.

2
  • 8
    What if the generator is infinite?
    – enedil
    Commented May 15, 2018 at 16:10
  • 2
    This should be higher up, as doing this comes at a significant cost in terms of time. Thank you for pointing this out.
    – ZdWhite
    Commented Jun 21, 2019 at 17:59
4

If n is known at authoring-time, you can use destructuring. e.g. to get the 3rd item:

>>> _, _, third, *rest = range(10)
>>> third
2
>>> rest
[3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
2

My solution would be:

[_ for _ in range(n-1) if next(gen) and False ]
return next(gen) 

As next(gen) and False is always false, the list comprehension does nothing but executing next(gen) n-1 times.

In my testing, it is as fast as using itertools.islice

4
  • 1
    I like it a lot, this doesn't import itertools or pretends to create a "slice", instead simply "jumps" through the iterator and returns the next() value. Commented Aug 19, 2022 at 12:16
  • Check out my take on this, with some criticisms =) Commented Aug 20, 2022 at 10:00
  • 1
    @KlasŠ. you misread my solution. As "next(gen) and False" is always false, it never adds anything to the list. It only creates an empty list, make some kind of empty loop then discard the still empty list. It means to be memory efficient.
    – Madlozoz
    Commented Aug 21, 2022 at 18:12
  • Right you are, totally missed that, my bad =) Commented Aug 22, 2022 at 10:44
0

The first thing that came to my mind was:

gen = (i for i in xrange(10))
index = 5

for i, v in zip(range(index), gen): pass

return v
0

Building up on @Madlozoz answer, but with mighty walrus operator:

>>> gen = (x ** 2 for x in itertools.count())
>>> [v := next(gen) for _ in range(10)]
[0, 1, 4, 9, 16, 25, 36, 49, 64, 81]
>>> v
81

The thing I don't like about this (unlike Madlozoz') solution is that potentially huge list is constructed just to be discarded immediately.


A simple for loop is another way:

# `gen` continues from the previous snippet
>>> for _ in range(3):
...     v = next(gen)
...
>>> print(v)
144

At a cost of extra line we can save some process ticks on assignments as well and spend them on wrapper class:

class IterIndexer:

    def __init__(self, iter_):
        self.iter = iter_

    def __getitem__(self, i):
        for _ in range(i - 1):
            next(self.iter)
        return next(self.iter)


gen = (x ** 2 for x in itertools.count())
gen = IterIndexer(gen)
print(gen[14])
169

It'd be even cooler to wrap it properly, so that you can use wrapper instance for everything instead of original generator or iterator, but that's another question =)

-2

Perhaps you should elaborate more on a actual use case.

>>> gen = xrange(10)
>>> ind=5 
>>> gen[ind]
5
2
  • 4
    I editted xrange(10) to (i for i in xrange(10)). Turns out this syntax works for xrange since it's not really a generator... Commented Feb 20, 2010 at 2:21
  • 5
    xrange predates generators, and returns an xrange object, which actually implements the full sequence protocol. Commented Feb 20, 2010 at 6:16
-2

Best to use is : example :

a = gen values ('a','c','d','e')

so the answer will be :

a = list(a) -> this will convert the generator to a list (it will store in memory)

then when you want to go specific index you will :

a[INDEX] -> and you will able to get the value its holds 

if you want to know only the count or to do operations that not required store in memory best practice will be : a = sum(1 in i in a) -> this will count the number of objects you have

hope i made it more simple.

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