How can I convert a floating point integer to a string in C/C++ without the library function sprintf?

I'm looking for a function, e.g. char *ftoa(float num) that converts num to a string and returns it.

ftoa(3.1415) should return "3.1415".

up vote 9 down vote accepted

When you're dealing with fp numbers, it can get very compex but the algorithm is simplistic and similar to edgar holleis's answer; kudos! Its complex because when you're dealing with floating point numbers, the calculations will be a little off depending on the precision you've chosen. That's why its not good programming practice to compare a float to a zero.

But there is an answer and this is my attempt at implementing it. Here I've used a tolerance value so you don't end up calculating too many decimal places resulting in an infinite loop. I'm sure there might be better solutions out there but this should help give you a good understanding of how to do it.

char fstr[80];
float num = 2.55f;
int m = log10(num);
int digit;
float tolerance = .0001f;

while (num > 0 + precision)
{
    float weight = pow(10.0f, m);
    digit = floor(num / weight);
    num -= (digit*weight);
    *(fstr++)= '0' + digit;
    if (m == 0)
        *(fstr++) = '.';
    m--;
}
*(fstr) = '\0';
  • @Pal, Good answer. thanks – SIVA Feb 21 '10 at 16:38
  • 3
    "tolerance" is unused. – Janus Troelsen Nov 10 '11 at 14:58
  • There's a problem with this. If num is smaller than 1 you will calculate the string wrong. You need to change the 3rd line to be floor(log10(num)) – Andi Jay Jul 3 '12 at 21:17
  • Another issue is if you try to convert a number that has a 0 in the ones place. For example 230.0. You will only get 23 in this case the way it is written now. You have to change the condition in the while loop to ((num > 0 + precision)||(m >= 0)) – Andi Jay Jul 5 '12 at 21:18
  • Just to note that this implementation, and androider's improvement, is good. Hpwever, with a high precision (eg: 9 dp) the repeated pow() can make this rather slow. Not great if this is part of other actions providing user feedback I've found. – Toby Jul 23 '14 at 9:14

Based on Sophy Pal's answer, this is a slightly more complete solution that takes into account the number zero, NaN, infinite, negative numbers, and scientific notation. Albeit sprintf still provides a more accurate string representation.

/* 
   Double to ASCII Conversion without sprintf.
   Roughly equivalent to: sprintf(s, "%.14g", n);
*/

#include <math.h>
#include <string.h>
// For printf
#include <stdio.h>

static double PRECISION = 0.00000000000001;
static int MAX_NUMBER_STRING_SIZE = 32;

/**
 * Double to ASCII
 */
char * dtoa(char *s, double n) {
    // handle special cases
    if (isnan(n)) {
        strcpy(s, "nan");
    } else if (isinf(n)) {
        strcpy(s, "inf");
    } else if (n == 0.0) {
        strcpy(s, "0");
    } else {
        int digit, m, m1;
        char *c = s;
        int neg = (n < 0);
        if (neg)
            n = -n;
        // calculate magnitude
        m = log10(n);
        int useExp = (m >= 14 || (neg && m >= 9) || m <= -9);
        if (neg)
            *(c++) = '-';
        // set up for scientific notation
        if (useExp) {
            if (m < 0)
               m -= 1.0;
            n = n / pow(10.0, m);
            m1 = m;
            m = 0;
        }
        if (m < 1.0) {
            m = 0;
        }
        // convert the number
        while (n > PRECISION || m >= 0) {
            double weight = pow(10.0, m);
            if (weight > 0 && !isinf(weight)) {
                digit = floor(n / weight);
                n -= (digit * weight);
                *(c++) = '0' + digit;
            }
            if (m == 0 && n > 0)
                *(c++) = '.';
            m--;
        }
        if (useExp) {
            // convert the exponent
            int i, j;
            *(c++) = 'e';
            if (m1 > 0) {
                *(c++) = '+';
            } else {
                *(c++) = '-';
                m1 = -m1;
            }
            m = 0;
            while (m1 > 0) {
                *(c++) = '0' + m1 % 10;
                m1 /= 10;
                m++;
            }
            c -= m;
            for (i = 0, j = m-1; i<j; i++, j--) {
                // swap without temporary
                c[i] ^= c[j];
                c[j] ^= c[i];
                c[i] ^= c[j];
            }
            c += m;
        }
        *(c) = '\0';
    }
    return s;
}

int main(int argc, char** argv) {

    int i;
    char s[MAX_NUMBER_STRING_SIZE];
    double d[] = {
        0.0,
        42.0,
        1234567.89012345,
        0.000000000000018,
        555555.55555555555555555,
        -888888888888888.8888888,
        111111111111111111111111.2222222222
    };
    for (i = 0; i < 7; i++) {
        printf("%d: printf: %.14g, dtoa: %s\n", i+1, d[i], dtoa(s, d[i]));
    }
}

Outputs:

  1. printf: 0, dtoa: 0
  2. printf: 42, dtoa: 42
  3. printf: 1234567.8901234, dtoa: 1234567.89012344996444
  4. printf: 1.8e-14, dtoa: 1.79999999999999e-14
  5. printf: 555555.55555556, dtoa: 555555.55555555550381
  6. printf: -8.8888888888889e+14, dtoa: -8.88888888888888e+14
  7. printf: 1.1111111111111e+23, dtoa: 1.11111111111111e+23
  • I snagged this one for my (open source) library. Commenting everything and making it slightly more efficient. Once I'm done, would you rather I A) edit your answer with the tweaked code, or B) posted it separately and credited you with the original? I'm good either way. (If I don't hear, I'll assume B). – CodeMouse92 Sep 24 '15 at 22:09
  • 1
    Negative infinity prints inf right? Shouldn't it check the sign bit and return -inf if negative? – doug65536 Nov 11 '16 at 15:54
  1. Use the log-function to find out the magnitude m of your number. If the magnitude is negative print "0." and an appropriate amount of zeros.
  2. Consecutively divide by 10^m and cast the result to int to get the decimal digits. m-- for the next digit.
  3. If you came accross m==0, don't forget to print the decimal point ".".
  4. Break off after a couple of digits. If m>0 when you break of, don't forget to print "E" and itoa(m).

Instead of the log-function you can also directly extract the exponent by bitshifting and correcting for the exponent's offset (see IEEE 754). Java has a double-to-bits function to get at the binary representation.

 /*
  * Program to convert float number to string without using sprintf
  */

#include "iostream"    
#include "string"    
#include "math.h"

# define PRECISION 5

using namespace std;

char*  floatToString(float num)
{
   int whole_part = num;
   int digit = 0, reminder =0;
   int log_value = log10(num), index = log_value;
   long wt =0;

   // String containg result
   char* str = new char[20];

   //Initilise stirng to zero
   memset(str, 0 ,20);

   //Extract the whole part from float num
   for(int  i = 1 ; i < log_value + 2 ; i++)
   {
       wt  =  pow(10.0,i);
       reminder = whole_part  %  wt;
       digit = (reminder - digit) / (wt/10);

       //Store digit in string
       str[index--] = digit + 48;              // ASCII value of digit  = digit + 48
       if (index == -1)
          break;    
   }

    index = log_value + 1;
    str[index] = '.';

   float fraction_part  = num - whole_part;
   float tmp1 = fraction_part,  tmp =0;

   //Extract the fraction part from  num
   for( int i= 1; i < PRECISION; i++)
   {
      wt =10; 
      tmp  = tmp1 * wt;
      digit = tmp;

      //Store digit in string
      str[++index] = digit +48;           // ASCII value of digit  = digit + 48
      tmp1 = tmp - digit;
   }    

   return str;
}


//Main program
void main()
{
    int i;
    float f = 123456.789;
    char* str =  floatToString(f);
    cout  << endl <<  str;
    cin >> i;
    delete [] str;
}
  • worked like a charm for me. – dmSherazi Jun 30 '14 at 7:29

Just found realy good implementation at https://code.google.com/p/stringencoders/

size_t modp_dtoa(double value, char* str, int prec)
{
    /* Hacky test for NaN
     * under -fast-math this won't work, but then you also won't
     * have correct nan values anyways.  The alternative is
     * to link with libmath (bad) or hack IEEE double bits (bad)
     */
    if (! (value == value)) {
        str[0] = 'n'; str[1] = 'a'; str[2] = 'n'; str[3] = '\0';
        return (size_t)3;
    }
    /* if input is larger than thres_max, revert to exponential */
    const double thres_max = (double)(0x7FFFFFFF);

    double diff = 0.0;
    char* wstr = str;

    if (prec < 0) {
        prec = 0;
    } else if (prec > 9) {
        /* precision of >= 10 can lead to overflow errors */
        prec = 9;
    }


    /* we'll work in positive values and deal with the
       negative sign issue later */
    int neg = 0;
    if (value < 0) {
        neg = 1;
        value = -value;
    }


    int whole = (int) value;
    double tmp = (value - whole) * powers_of_10[prec];
    uint32_t frac = (uint32_t)(tmp);
    diff = tmp - frac;

    if (diff > 0.5) {
        ++frac;
        /* handle rollover, e.g.  case 0.99 with prec 1 is 1.0  */
        if (frac >= powers_of_10[prec]) {
            frac = 0;
            ++whole;
        }
    } else if (diff == 0.5 && ((frac == 0) || (frac & 1))) {
        /* if halfway, round up if odd, OR
           if last digit is 0.  That last part is strange */
        ++frac;
    }

    /* for very large numbers switch back to native sprintf for exponentials.
       anyone want to write code to replace this? */
    /*
      normal printf behavior is to print EVERY whole number digit
      which can be 100s of characters overflowing your buffers == bad
    */
    if (value > thres_max) {
        sprintf(str, "%e", neg ? -value : value);
        return strlen(str);
    }

    if (prec == 0) {
        diff = value - whole;
        if (diff > 0.5) {
            /* greater than 0.5, round up, e.g. 1.6 -> 2 */
            ++whole;
        } else if (diff == 0.5 && (whole & 1)) {
            /* exactly 0.5 and ODD, then round up */
            /* 1.5 -> 2, but 2.5 -> 2 */
            ++whole;
        }
    } else {
        int count = prec;
        // now do fractional part, as an unsigned number
        do {
            --count;
            *wstr++ = (char)(48 + (frac % 10));
        } while (frac /= 10);
        // add extra 0s
        while (count-- > 0) *wstr++ = '0';
        // add decimal
        *wstr++ = '.';
    }

    // do whole part
    // Take care of sign
    // Conversion. Number is reversed.
    do *wstr++ = (char)(48 + (whole % 10)); while (whole /= 10);
    if (neg) {
        *wstr++ = '-';
    }
    *wstr='\0';
    strreverse(str, wstr-1);
    return (size_t)(wstr - str);
}
  • Hmm, if you're already using string.h functions, might as well do strcpy(str,"nan"); instead of individually changing characters. Also, if you don't mind using math.h (and compile with -lm), you can do isnan(value) instead of the hacky test. – MD XF Oct 11 '17 at 2:43

You have two major problems:

  1. Converting the bit representation into a string of characters
  2. Allocating enough memory to store the characters.

The simplest way to solve the second part is to allocate a big enough chunk for every possible answer. Start with that. Later you'll want to be more clever, but don't bother until you've solved the numeric part of the problem.

You have two sets of tools available for dealing with the numeric part of the problem: direct bit manipulation (masking, shifting, etc) and arithmetic operation (*,+,/, plus possibly math functions link log()).

In principle you could tackle the bitwise representation directly, but that would not be portable in the event that floating point representation formats change in the future. The method suggested by edgar.holleis should be portable.

Here's what I came up with; it's very efficient and very simple. It assumes your system has itoa.

#include <math.h>
#include <string.h>

/* return decimal part of val */
int dec(float val)
{
    int mult = floor(val);

    while (floor(val) != ceil(val)) {
        mult *= 10;
        val *= 10;
    }

    return floor(val) - mult;
}

/* convert a double to a string */
char *ftoa(float val, char *str)
{
    if (isnan(n)) {
        strcpy(str, "NaN");
        return str;
    } else if (isinf(n)) {
        strcpy(str, "inf");
        return str;
    }

    char leading_integer[31]  = {0};  // 63 instead of 31 for 64-bit systems
    char trailing_decimal[31] = {0};  // 63 instead of 31 for 64-bit systems

    /* fill string with leading integer */
    itoa(floor(val), leading_integer, 10);

    /* fill string with the decimal part */
    itoa(dec(val), trailing_decimal, 10);

    /* set given string to full decimal */
    strcpy(str, leading_integer);
    strcat(str, ".");
    strcat(str, trailing_decimal);

    return str;
}

Try it online!

This gist might help : https://gist.github.com/psych0der/6319244 Basic idea is split the whole part and decimal part and then concatenate both of them with decimal in between.

  • Link-only answers are not generally accepted on this site. – MD XF Oct 11 '17 at 2:42

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