9

In my actual project It happened accidentally here is my modified small program.

I can't figure out why it is giving output 10?

public class Int
{
    public static void main(String args[])
    {
        int j=012;//accidentaly i put zero 
        System.out.println(j);// prints 10??
    }
}

After that, I put two zeros still giving output 10.

Then I change 012 to 0123 and now it is giving output 83?

Can anyone explain why?

  • 3
    1 is decimal, 01 is octal, 0x1 is hexadecimal, 0b1 is binary (in Java SE 7) Edit: '1' is char, "1" is string. – Grijesh Chauhan Apr 13 '14 at 9:45
  • Additionally, you may like to know that 08 is compilation error – Grijesh Chauhan Apr 13 '14 at 9:51
  • @GrijeshChauhan ThankYou for your reply.I would rather accrepted your comment as an answer. :) your explanation is perfect and +1 for link. – CoderCroc Apr 13 '14 at 10:13
  • Because there's no decimal literal (base-10) prefix in Java, you can't start a decimal value with a leading zero. – buchWyrm May 8 at 20:56
21

Than I change 012 to 0123 and now it is giving output 83?

Because, it's taken as octal base (8), since that numeral have 0 in leading. So, it's corresponding decimal value is 10

012 :

(2 * 8 ^ 0) + (1 * 8 ^ 1) = 10

0123 :

(3 * 8 ^ 0) + (2 * 8 ^ 1) + (1 * 8 ^ 2) = 83
  • thanks for this, how would I determine whether it's taken as octal base or some other base? – Bhavesh Agarwal Oct 1 '14 at 14:09
  • @BhaveshAgarwal : It's clearly explained, since that numeral have 0 in leading, it's considerder as octal base. – Abimaran Kugathasan Oct 2 '14 at 4:22
  • thanks Abimaran. Sorry for not being clear on my query. I intend to ask how would we "in general" determine whether a number is in which base. Like numbers starting from 0 will be octal, with "x" will be decimal, with "y" will be blah blah... Just wanted to understand the basics identifying the bases, for all important/famous bases. – Bhavesh Agarwal Oct 3 '14 at 4:43
  • Just to make it clear for some people trying to calculate the operation above, there should be: 3 * 8 ^ 0 + 2 * 8 ^ 1 + 1 * 8 ^ 2 – intersum Oct 27 '14 at 13:28
  • @BhaveshAgarwal if I understand you correctly you asking literal prefixes for numbers. Java supports octal, hexadecimal, decimal and binary. We can represent an Octal number by adding the 0 prefix to it. Hexadecimal number by adding the 0x prefix to it. we don’t add any prefix, the number is treated as a decimal number. And with Java 7 we have a new literal prefix to represent binary base, which is the 0b prefix. Read: rodrigosasaki.com/2013/06/10/number-literals-in-java – Rasika Perera Jun 3 '15 at 5:01
6

The leading zero means the number is being interpreted as octal rather than decimal.

  • 1
    And what is 0 ? Octal or Decimal? – Grijesh Chauhan Apr 13 '14 at 9:47
  • 2
    @GrijeshChauhan Doesn't matter. 0 means nothing in both bases. – The6P4C Apr 13 '14 at 10:18
  • 2
    @The6P4C I have quite a lot interest in formal theory. So it does matter to me :) Anyways, 0 in Java is a Decimal, In octal 00 is zero, likewise in Hex 0x0 is Zero. (further if you knows C++ 0 is interpreted as octal) – Grijesh Chauhan Apr 13 '14 at 10:26
  • @GrijeshChauhan However, they are both equivalent, so the resulting number is the same. – The6P4C Apr 13 '14 at 23:45
  • @The6P4C yes, you are correct, magnitude wise both are equivalent but semantically different. – Grijesh Chauhan Apr 14 '14 at 5:33
2

You are assigning a constant to a variable using an octal representation of an type int constant. So the compiler gets the integer value out of the octal representation 010 by converting it to the decimal representation using this algorithm 0*8^0 + 1+8^1 = 10 and then assign j to 10. Remember when you see a constant starting with 0 it's an integer in octal representation. i.e. 0111 is not 1 hundred and 11 but it's 1*8^0 + 1*8^1 + 1*8^2.

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