1

I was reading about JavaScript Number object on Mozilla Developer Network. I am new to this. Below is my script:

var number = 16;
console.log( Number.prototype.toExponential(number) );
console.log( Number.prototype.toFixed(number) );
console.log( Number.prototype.toPrecision(number) );
// DON'T UNDERSTAND WHAT THIS DOES
// console.log( Number.prototype.toSource(number) );
console.log( Number.prototype.valueOf(number) );  

and the output:

0.0000000000000000e+0 
0.0000000000000000 
0.000000000000000 
0   

I am wondering why I am getting all zeros despite number = 16. Please help me in understanding this. :)

3

You have to have:

var number = 16;
console.log(number.toExponential());
console.log(number.toFixed());
console.log(number.toPrecision());

With prototype you can define you own methods and properties of objects

With prototype basically extending objects

Here is a simple example of prototype:

Number.prototype.isPrime = function() {
    if ( this === 0 || this === 1 ) {
        return false;
    }
    for ( var i = 2; i < this; i++ ) {
        if ( this % i === 0 ) {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
};

var arr = [2,4,5,13,15,121];

for ( var i = 0; i < arr.length; i++ ) {
    console.log(arr[i].isPrime());
}

In this example this keyword refers to number object (so you don't have to pass any argument in function for manipulation)

JSFIDDLE

Take a look on prototype

|improve this answer|||||
  • 1
    But please never change Host objects in real life. – phylax Apr 13 '14 at 17:25
  • 1
    @phylax What does that mean ? :) – Little Child Apr 13 '14 at 17:25
  • 1
    Host objects are Number, Array, String ... changing their behaviour is considered bad practice. Read more here: stackoverflow.com/questions/6223449/… – phylax Apr 13 '14 at 17:28
  • 2
    @phylax: Those aren't Host objects, and in real life it can be useful to extend their prototypes. Different people have different opinions on the matter, but there's nothing inherently wrong with it. It's more situational. – cookie monster Apr 13 '14 at 17:30
  • 1
    @phylax Like cookie monster said I don't see any problem in this, anyways I just showed an example how prototype works – nanobash Apr 13 '14 at 17:32
2

Number.prototype functions live on actual numbers (the prototype is the definition for a specific type. String variables have functions that live on String.prototype, arrays have functions defined on Array.prototype, etc. http://javascript.crockford.com/prototypal.html is a good starting place to learn about prototype inheritance), so just call number.toFixed(), number.toFixed() etc. You can even do (16).toString() etc.

You're calling the function "on nothing" by calling the prototype function, instead of "on 16".

|improve this answer|||||
  • Please explain the .prototype concept to me :) I have never seen it before :) – Little Child Apr 13 '14 at 17:18
  • 2
    it's the entire underpinning of object oriented javascript... =) Objects have types that are defined by a prototype, and instances share all prototype functions. You definitely want to read up on it with something like "JavaScript: the good parts" to familiarise yourself with the very core of how JavaScript works =) – Mike 'Pomax' Kamermans Apr 13 '14 at 17:20
  • So far what I have learned has been how to use JavaScript rather than the workings. Like I said, I am new to this. Any good book you recommend ? :) – Little Child Apr 13 '14 at 17:21
  • I updated the answer with a useful link for you, the rest of Crockford's writing on JavaScript is generally worth reading, too, if you're learning JavaScript – Mike 'Pomax' Kamermans Apr 13 '14 at 17:22
  • @LittleChild Take a look at my example – nanobash Apr 13 '14 at 17:24
2

You will have better luck if you do the following:

var number = new Number(16);
console.log(number.toExponential());
console.log(number.toFixed());
console.log(number.toPrecision());
console.log(number.valueOf());

Note* It's preferable not to use numbers in javascript this way unless you have a specific need to avoid primitives.

The reason you are getting 0 is because the Number prototype defaults to zero if it is not instantiated.

Number is a prototype which is designed semantically to be used to spawn new objects which inherit these methods. These methods are not designed to be called directly from the Number prototype, but instead from the numbers themselves. Try the following:

(16).toExponential();

You have to wrap the number in parenthesis so the interpreter knows you're accessing methods and not defining a floating point.

The important thing here to understand is that the Number prototype provides all the methods that all numbers will inherit in javascript.

To explain further why you are getting a 0, the methods on the Number prototype are intended to be "bound" to a number object. They will use the bound object for input and will ignore any arguments. Since they are bound to the default Number object, the default number is 0, and therefore all methods will return their version of 0.

There is a way in javascript to rebind methods to an object using the "call" method (there's also bind and apply):

Number.prototype.toExponential.call(16);
|improve this answer|||||
  • 1
    You should not advocate the use of new Number. Some less experience dev might pick that up and run into all sorts of problems later on. I like the rest of the answer though :) – Felix Kling Apr 13 '14 at 17:38
  • I'm merely using it to demonstrate how the Number prototype is instantiated. Of course, I also provide the "primitive" way of accessing the associated methods. – James M. Lay Apr 13 '14 at 17:39
  • However, if I may ask, why is the use of new Number frowned upon? – James M. Lay Apr 13 '14 at 17:40
  • 1
    Mainly because it makes comparison inconsistent. E.g. new Number(16) === new Number(16) is false. new Number(0) < new Number(16) is true. Sideeffects of working with an object instead of a primitive value. – Felix Kling Apr 13 '14 at 17:41
1

try this:

var number = 16;
console.log( Number.prototype.toExponential.call(number) );

Notice the call() which calles the method toExponential of the Number object on an instance.

|improve this answer|||||

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.