253

Summary: I would like to call an asynchronous method in a constructor. Is this possible?

Details: I have a method called getwritings() that parses JSON data. Everything works fine if I just call getwritings() in an async method and put await to left of it. However , when I create a LongListView in my page and try to populate it I'm finding that getWritings() is surprisingly returning null and the LongListView is empty.

To address this problem, I tried changing the return type of getWritings() to Task<List<Writing>> and then retrieving the result in the constructor via getWritings().Result. However, doing that ends up blocking the UI thread.

public partial class Page2 : PhoneApplicationPage
{
    List<Writing> writings;

    public Page2()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        getWritings();
    }

    private async void getWritings()
    {
        string jsonData = await JsonDataManager.GetJsonAsync("1");
        JObject obj = JObject.Parse(jsonData);
        JArray array = (JArray)obj["posts"];

        for (int i = 0; i < array.Count; i++)
        {
            Writing writing = new Writing();
            writing.content = JsonDataManager.JsonParse(array, i, "content");
            writing.date = JsonDataManager.JsonParse(array, i, "date");
            writing.image = JsonDataManager.JsonParse(array, i, "url");
            writing.summary = JsonDataManager.JsonParse(array, i, "excerpt");
            writing.title = JsonDataManager.JsonParse(array, i, "title");

            writings.Add(writing);
        }

        myLongList.ItemsSource = writings;
    }
}
9
  • 1
    Why do you want to do it in the Constructor? Apr 13, 2014 at 20:51
  • 6
    i have to call in somewhere otherwise how can i put my data in it any suggestion ? Apr 13, 2014 at 20:54
  • 3
    i would do in the override async void OnNavigatedTo(System.Windows.Navigation.NavigationEventArgs e) { //here } Apr 13, 2014 at 20:55
  • 1
    Why do you need to access the result? Just call getWRitings() or whatever async method and don't await it. It won't be done when the constructor ends, but that's ok. Don't use its value there, instead - use its value in another method and call that. Apr 13, 2014 at 21:16
  • thank you this is exactly what i am doing right now and its done :) Apr 13, 2014 at 21:21

15 Answers 15

155

The best solution is to acknowledge the asynchronous nature of the download and design for it.

In other words, decide what your application should look like while the data is downloading. Have the page constructor set up that view, and start the download. When the download completes update the page to display the data.

I have a blog post on asynchronous constructors that you may find useful. Also, some MSDN articles; one on asynchronous data-binding (if you're using MVVM) and another on asynchronous best practices (i.e., you should avoid async void).

6
  • 14
    Too bad this answer applies specifically for UI code. I'm writing a Windows service that needs the constructor to load some things into memory, with the data coming from some async methods elsewhere.
    – Ellesedil
    Nov 26, 2014 at 15:45
  • 7
    @Ellesedil: This answer refers to MVVM specifically because this question was asking about MVVM specifically. My blog post is applicable to Win32 services, and you could ask your own question if you wish. Nov 26, 2014 at 15:48
  • @Ellesedil I have the same problem as yours, I convert the async to sync and load it to memory... How do you solve this problem?
    – Bargitta
    Apr 20, 2016 at 3:11
  • 1
    @Matus: First, explore redesigning the type so that it doesn't need asynchronous data at construction time. If that is untenable, then you can inject an asynchronous factory. Nov 2, 2018 at 17:25
  • 1
    @BVernon: It's an older one I didn't mention because it's not good. :) ContinueWith is a dangerous, low-level method (link to my blog). Modern code should use await instead. Side note: in JS, then should be replaced with await, too. Oct 19, 2021 at 13:51
117

You can also do just like this:

Task.Run(() => this.FunctionAsync()).Wait();

Note: Be careful about thread blocking!

12
  • 27
    how is that different from FunctionAsync().Wait() May 21, 2015 at 20:03
  • 12
    You should be really careful, because it's not only blocking the thread, but can cause a deadlock (see here e.g.: stackoverflow.com/questions/15021304/…). Especially easy to get a deadlock in winforms Oct 29, 2015 at 9:55
  • 8
    @IlyaChernomordik While it is blocking the thread where the constructor is run, the this.FunctionAsync() call is executed in a different thread and upon completion the constructor is resumed. This pattern should actually work, while a direct this.FunctionAsync().Wait() would indeed deadlock. The gotcha: do not depend on specific thread affinity inside FunctionAsync, because its executing thread can be anything.
    – grek40
    Dec 4, 2015 at 7:05
  • 3
    Great for test setup
    – NeedHack
    Nov 23, 2016 at 11:27
  • 2
    I don't know how to thank you , i have very bad problem and i solved it by your solution that was great Oct 31, 2017 at 9:42
85

I'd like to share a pattern that I've been using to solve these kinds of problems. It works rather well I think. Of course, it only works if you have control over what calls the constructor. Example below

public class MyClass
{
    public static async Task<MyClass> Create()
    {
        var myClass = new MyClass();
        await myClass.Initialize();
        return myClass;
    }

    private MyClass()
    {

    }

    private async Task Initialize()
    {
        await Task.Delay(1000); // Do whatever asynchronous work you need to do
    }
}

Basicly what we do is we make the constructor private and make our own public static async method that is responsible for creating an instance of MyClass. By making the constructor private and keeping the static method within the same class we have made sure that noone could "accidently" create an instance of this class without calling the proper initialization methods. All the logic around the creation of the object is still contained within the class (just within a static method).

var myClass1 = new MyClass() // Cannot be done, the constructor is private
var myClass2 = MyClass.Create() // Returns a Task that promises an instance of MyClass once it's finished
var myClass3 = await MyClass.Create() // asynchronously creates and initializes an instance of MyClass

Implemented on the current scenario it would look something like:

public partial class Page2 : PhoneApplicationPage
{
    public static async Task<Page2> Create()
    {
        var page = new Page2();
        await page.getWritings();
        return page;
    }

    List<Writing> writings;

    private Page2()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    private async Task getWritings()
    {
        string jsonData = await JsonDataManager.GetJsonAsync("1");
        JObject obj = JObject.Parse(jsonData);
        JArray array = (JArray)obj["posts"];

        for (int i = 0; i < array.Count; i++)
        {
            Writing writing = new Writing();
            writing.content = JsonDataManager.JsonParse(array, i, "content");
            writing.date = JsonDataManager.JsonParse(array, i, "date");
            writing.image = JsonDataManager.JsonParse(array, i, "url");
            writing.summary = JsonDataManager.JsonParse(array, i, "excerpt");
            writing.title = JsonDataManager.JsonParse(array, i, "title");

            writings.Add(writing);
        }

        myLongList.ItemsSource = writings;
    }
}

And instead of doing

var page = new Page2();

You would be doing

var page = await Page2.Create();
6
  • 2
    This approach uses a factory pattern. See another well-received similar answer here.
    – DavidRR
    May 26, 2016 at 12:52
  • 3
    How can I use this with dependency injection (constructor injection)? Jun 26, 2017 at 22:06
  • 2
    Pass the dependencies through the static create
    – Void
    May 5, 2018 at 11:31
  • Yes, but I need the use this async Create() in the Load() method of my Ninject ApplicationModule. This is because this object is consumed by another object during the injection. There is no way to make an async call in the Application Module. May 5, 2019 at 23:02
  • 2
    It doesn't. It provides an alternate solution to the problem
    – Shazi
    Oct 13, 2020 at 11:16
13

A quick way to execute some time-consuming operation in any constructor is by creating an action and run them asynchronously.

new Action( async() => await InitializeThingsAsync())();

Running this piece of code will neither block your UI nor leave you with any loose threads. And if you need to update any UI (considering you are not using MVVM approach), you can use the Dispatcher to do so as many have suggested.

A Note: This option only provides you a way to start an execution of a method from the constructor if you don't have any init or onload or navigated overrides. Most likely this will keep on running even after the construction has been completed. Hence the result of this method call may NOT be available in the constructor itself.

2
  • thanks for your answer can you describe what is different between above solution and Using Task.Run(async () => await InitializeThingsAsync()); Jul 20, 2021 at 7:08
  • 1
    Only difference I can see is you can await the statement Task.Run(async () => await InitializeThingsAsync()); in an async method. However new Action( async() => await InitializeThingsAsync())(); is a synchronous call. Jul 20, 2021 at 20:17
6

Try to replace this:

myLongList.ItemsSource = writings;

with this

Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(() => myLongList.ItemsSource = writings);
2
  • can you undo your answer cause Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(() => myLongList.ItemsSource = writings); works finally :) thank you i solve the problem i am gonna select your answer as best Apr 13, 2014 at 21:16
  • @KBB check the rollback Apr 13, 2014 at 21:24
6

My preferred approach:

// caution: fire and forget
Task.Run(async () => await someAsyncFunc());
5
  • This does not ensure that the data will be available when you'll want to use them, because the Task that creates them is fired-and-forgotten. And in case of an exception the data will never become available. Oct 30, 2019 at 5:33
  • @TheodorZoulias - Correct, however the question reads as follows: "I would like to call an asynchronous method in a constructor. Is this possible?" It's possible to perform, but also make sense to know of the pitfalls. Regardless I don't see this exact implementation in any of the other examples on this thread. Also fire-and-forget may be a valid approach depending on scenario, and I'd argue that "data will never become available" could be resolved with exception handling. I've mostly seen this pattern used with MVVM and Desktop/Mobile where you can use two-way data binding to refresh.
    – mdlars
    Oct 30, 2019 at 6:16
  • 2
    You have a point. Nevertheless, you should at least make it more prominent that you are initiating a fire-and-forget task. Nowadays it seems that the preferred way to do it is to assign it to a discard: _ = Task.Run(async... Oct 30, 2019 at 6:22
  • 1
    @Theodor Zoulias - Thanks for this comment. My compiler was suggesting I refactor to this discard operator earlier today on something and I had no idea what it was talking about. Working on something else right now where this helped and all the sudden clicked. Thanks.
    – Sam
    Sep 16, 2020 at 21:37
  • you can wait it to be done in this way: var taskVar = Task.Run(async () => await someAsyncFunc()); taskVar.Wait(); it works for me (.net core 3.1) May 12 at 12:18
4

To put it simply, referring to Stephen Cleary https://stackoverflow.com/a/23051370/267000

your page on creation should create tasks in constructor and you should declare those tasks as class members or put it in your task pool.

Your data are fetched during these tasks, but these tasks should awaited in the code i.e. on some UI manipulations, i.e. Ok Click etc.

I developped such apps in WP, we had a whole bunch of tasks created on start.

1

You could try AsyncMVVM.

Page2.xaml:

<PhoneApplicationPage x:Class="Page2"
                      xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation">
    <ListView ItemsSource="{Binding Writings}" />
</PhoneApplicationPage>

Page2.xaml.cs:

public partial class Page2
{
    InitializeComponent();
    DataContext = new ViewModel2();
}

ViewModel2.cs:

public class ViewModel2: AsyncBindableBase
{
    public IEnumerable<Writing> Writings
    {
        get { return Property.Get(GetWritingsAsync); }
    }

    private async Task<IEnumerable<Writing>> GetWritingsAsync()
    {
        string jsonData = await JsonDataManager.GetJsonAsync("1");
        JObject obj = JObject.Parse(jsonData);
        JArray array = (JArray)obj["posts"];

        for (int i = 0; i < array.Count; i++)
        {
            Writing writing = new Writing();
            writing.content = JsonDataManager.JsonParse(array, i, "content");
            writing.date = JsonDataManager.JsonParse(array, i, "date");
            writing.image = JsonDataManager.JsonParse(array, i, "url");
            writing.summary = JsonDataManager.JsonParse(array, i, "excerpt");
            writing.title = JsonDataManager.JsonParse(array, i, "title");
            yield return writing;
        }
    }
}
1

Don't ever call .Wait() or .Result as this is going to lock your app. Don't spin up a new Task either, just call the ContinueWith

public class myClass
{
  public myClass
  {
    GetMessageAsync.ContinueWith(GetResultAsync);
  }

  async Task<string> GetMessageAsync()
  {
    return await Service.GetMessageFromAPI(); 
  }
private async Task GetResultAsync(Task<string> resultTask)
{
    if (resultTask.IsFaulted)
{
      Log(resultTask.Exception); 
}
eles
{
 //do what ever you need from the result
}
}
}

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/standard/asynchronous-programming-patterns/consuming-the-task-based-asynchronous-pattern

0

A little late to the party, but I think many are struggling with this...

I've been searching for this as well. And to get your method/action running async without waiting or blocking the thread, you'll need to queue it via the SynchronizationContext, so I came up with this solution:

I've made a helper-class for it.

public static class ASyncHelper
{

    public static void RunAsync(Func<Task> func)
    {
        var context = SynchronizationContext.Current;

        // you don't want to run it on a threadpool. So if it is null, 
        // you're not on a UI thread.
        if (context == null)
            throw new NotSupportedException(
                "The current thread doesn't have a SynchronizationContext");

        // post an Action as async and await the function in it.
        context.Post(new SendOrPostCallback(async state => await func()), null);
    }

    public static void RunAsync<T>(Func<T, Task> func, T argument)
    {
        var context = SynchronizationContext.Current;

        // you don't want to run it on a threadpool. So if it is null, 
        // you're not on a UI thread.
        if (context == null)
            throw new NotSupportedException(
                "The current thread doesn't have a SynchronizationContext");

        // post an Action as async and await the function in it.
        context.Post(new SendOrPostCallback(async state => await func((T)state)), argument);
    }
}

Usage/Example:

public partial class Form1 : Form
{

    private async Task Initialize()
    {
        // replace code here...
        await Task.Delay(1000);
    }

    private async Task Run(string myString)
    {

        // replace code here...
        await Task.Delay(1000);
    }

    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();

        // you don't have to await nothing.. (the thread must be running)
        ASyncHelper.RunAsync(Initialize);
        ASyncHelper.RunAsync(Run, "test");

        // In your case
        ASyncHelper.RunAsync(getWritings);
    }
}

This works for Windows.Forms and WPF

0
0

In order to use async within the constructor and ensure the data is available when you instantiate the class, you can use this simple pattern:

class FooClass : IFooAsync
{        
    FooClass 
    {
        this.FooAsync = InitFooTask();
    }

    public Task FooAsync { get; }

    private async Task InitFooTask()
    {
        await Task.Delay(5000);
    }
}

The interface:

public interface IFooAsync
{
    Task FooAsync { get; }
}

The usage:

FooClass foo = new FooClass();    
if (foo is IFooAsync)
    await foo.FooAsync;
0

Brian Lagunas has shown a solution that I really like. More info his youtube video

Solution:

Add a TaskExtensions method

  public static class TaskExtensions
{
    public static async void Await(this Task task, Action completedCallback = null ,Action<Exception> errorCallBack = null )
    {
        try
        {
            await task;
            completedCallback?.Invoke();
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            errorCallBack?.Invoke(e);
        }
    }
}

Usage:

  public class MyClass
{

    public MyClass()
    {
        DoSomething().Await();
       // DoSomething().Await(Completed, HandleError);
    }

    async Task DoSomething()
    {
        await Task.Delay(3000);
        //Some works here
        //throw new Exception("Thrown in task");
    }

    private void Completed()
    {
        //some thing;
    }

    private void HandleError(Exception ex)
    {
        //handle error
    }

}
4
  • async void methods are only allowed for EventHandlers. Await() with no parameters won't wait, but will do something called fire and forget, where you just start the async process and don't wait for it. At least await task.ConfigureAwait(false) should be called to have save calls in different SynchronisationContexts.
    – Redwolf
    Sep 12, 2020 at 11:59
  • Well, I thought this was the best hope for me. I'll just have to whimp out. I simply cannot make an async EF Add/Insert from my constuctor in a base controller class. To many hours and days and days and hours at this point. Have to bail and make it synchronous.
    – Sam
    Oct 13, 2020 at 2:59
  • Actually I am still getting my error but I am using this structure. I think it is helpful to see what is going on. The exception handler is catching my error.
    – Sam
    Oct 13, 2020 at 3:36
  • @Sam Make the constructor private. Then create a public static async Task<YourTypeHere> Create() method.
    – Redwolf
    Oct 26, 2020 at 15:24
-1

The answer is simple, If you are developing an UWP app, then add the async function to the Page_Loaded method of the page.

-1

if you want it to wait task to be done you can improve madlars codes like below. (I tried on .net core 3.1 it worked )

var taskVar = Task.Run(async () => await someAsyncFunc());

taskVar.Wait();

-3

You could put the async calls in a separate method and call that method in the constructor. Although, this may lead to a situation where some variable values not being available at the time you expect them.

 public NewTravelPageVM(){
   GetVenues();              
 }

 async void  GetVenues(){
   var locator = CrossGeolocator.Current;
   var position = await locator.GetPositionAsync();
   Venues = await Venue.GetVenues(position.Latitude, position.Longitude);
 }

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